Workplace Evaluations: Skills, Aptitude, Psychological and Lie Detector Tests

Ideally, every job applicant should be fully tested and evaluated before being hired for any position. However, state and federal laws impose certain restraints on the specific types of tests that can be given to job seekers. While skills tests are usually the most critical and widely accepted exams, care must be taken to administer them fairly and accurately.

Here’s a general overview of the types of job applicant rights you must respect while using any of the types of tests referenced above. As will be referenced below, all tests must be given in full compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

Skills and aptitude tests – evaluating clerical, computer software and other job skills

A general rule of thumb that can guide you about many tests is that they must be specific to the types of skills that a job requires on a regular basis. Therefore, it’s usually fine to find out how fast a potential clerical employee can type or how much someone knows about repairing and maintaining computer systems if you’re hiring a computer help desk employee.

While you can usually test most the job skills of the disabled, you may need to make some accommodations in how you administer such tests. Cornell University’s publication entitled, Pre-Employment Testing and the ADAis well worth reviewing to gain a better understanding of job testing requirements. Just keep in mind that certain timed tests may need to provide slightly longer completion times and accommodations may need to be extended to applicants who’ve made their special testing needs known to you, in advance.

Although general aptitude tests can still be given using multiple choice tests, great care must be taken to avoid formats that may mainly reward test-taking skills over a job candidate’s ability to properly handle future job tasks. Short-answer questions based on factual job topics may provide greater insights into a person’s capabilities.

Psychological testing of job applicants

Although some employers still place great value on these types of tests, they are no longer highly favored. Two of the chief reasons that employers are thinking twice about administering these types of tests is that they can sometimes illegally discriminate against certain job applicants or invade their privacy regarding their moral and religious beliefs.

Employers should only administer psychological profile tests that have been scientifically validated, indicating direct correlations with a worker’s job performance. Another potential problem with psychological testing is that the ADA does not allow medically oriented tests to be administered to applicants who are disabled — if it might help discern their disabilities.

In certain situations, the ADA may also require you to revise a psychological or other test if an applicant claims it tests skills related to his/her disability (such as hearing capacity) – that are not regularly required for the job.

Lie detector or “honesty” tests for job applicants and employees

In general, the federal Employee Polygraph Protection Act – with only limited exceptions – prevents employers from requiring job applicants or employees to undergo lie detector tests. While certain types of unique applicants or employees may have to take such tests – including those wanting to provide armored security services (or dispense pharmaceuticals) – restrictions must still be honored as to how such tests are administered and evaluated.

Most of the time, in the few instances when a larger employer might want to administer this type of test, it’s normally only used when there’s reasonable suspicion that an employee may have embezzled from the company or committed other workplace theft.

At present, experts on this topic indicate that it’s nearly always best to restrict the use of any type of “honesty” test to situations where an employee may need to handle cash.

Always remember that in order to protect your company or business from any possible future claims of discrimination, you must make sure that all job applicants take the required tests at the same basic time in the hiring process.

Every employer may want to create a copy of this EEOC document designed to help determine the best job candidates — while fully complying with all federal laws.

Please feel free to contact one of our Murray Lobb lawyers if you need legal advice about administering specific tests to any of your job applicants or employees. We also remain available to discuss any other legal concerns you may have – and can readily draft a wide range of contracts and other documents you may need while conducting daily transactions with your business customers and other parties.

Crafting Effective Job Descriptions and Ads

Creating the type of job ads that attract large pools of highly qualified candidates takes careful thought and planning, like every other important business task. Besides providing an accurate job title and listing the main duties of a position, you need to let job applicants know if a specific job will fit in with their current lifestyle and priorities.

Of course, you must also describe the minimum job qualifications and what you require in the way of prior experience and training. And all of this must be done in a manner that carefully avoids discriminating against anyone.

While drafting a proper job description may sound a bit intimidating, it can be done with relative ease if you’ll start by making a list of the key facts you need to communicate – while still making the job sound highly desirable. The job ad itself should be considerably shorter, in keeping with the online or print forum where you’ll be placing it.

Here’s a closer look at some of the broad topics and details you should always try to include.

After picking an appropriate job title — add a clear list of essential job duties

Since all jobs tend to change a bit over time, it’s a good idea to visit briefly with the person who recently supervised the worker in the vacant position. This will let you know if your old job description needs to be updated or expanded. Next, make a list of the most common tasks the person hired will need to handle on a regular basis. Always start by listing the most time-consuming job assignments.

Also, be sure to indicate if the open job is an entry-level, mid-level or senior-level job. And you’ll need to note whether the position involves training or supervising other employees —

and what percentage of the employee’s time may be devoted to such tasks.

What type of academic background – and prior job experience – are you seeking?

To avoid potentially discriminatory language, it’s wise to indicate that you’re looking for someone with either a college degree “or equivalent experience.” Be sure to also specifically list any professional licenses or certificates that the person must have already earned. Likewise, you should clearly state whether it’s a job that may frequently require over-time, weekend shifts or travel.

When you fail to mention such factors, you’ll likely end up interviewing people who would never have applied had you provided that crucial information.

Make one list of all the required skills – and a separate list of all desired skills

If the work requires clerical skills, you might indicate a minimum typing speed and then list the specific types of software program skills required. If you need someone who is bilingual, make it very clear if you’ll expect complete fluency.

Should you believe the job requires the ability to work well under pressure while meeting strict deadlines, it’s always wise to include that information, too.

Provide a brief description of the job culture, if possible

If your company is in start-up mode, be sure to share that since there are people who know that they usually do their best work in more stable or established work environments. Likewise, if you’ll be expecting this person to always work in-house – or remotely on one or more days – try to indicate that as well since some workers either strongly prefer that lifestyle or know that they do their best work in an office setting where they can readily consult with others on a regular basis.

Consider indicating the desired new hire’s personality type and work traits

If the person you want to hire needs highly developed interpersonal skills – perhaps because it’s a receptionist or job training position — you may want to mention that as a desirable strength. Likewise, if the new employee will be conducting considerable research for your firm, it’s fine to say that you’re looking for someone with strong analytical skills and keen attention to detail.

Unique job demands or requirements

In order to avoid creating problems for yourself with the Americans with Disabilities Act and other legislation designed to protect specific job applicant and employee rights, it’s best to note unique requirements in your job ad so applicants will clearly know what’s required in advance.

Here are some job demands that should always be noted in your full job description provided to all selected applicants prior to job interviews.

  • Night shifts. Let applicants know if the new person may have to regularly tackle night shifts, in keeping with your company’s changing needs;
  • Ability to lift and/or carry small or large objects of a certain weight. People deserve to know in advance if they’ll need to lift heavy boxes or other objects on a regular basis. When possible, try to provide an accurate range of weights involved;
  • Use of personal vehicle. Be sure to note this and indicate that any job offer will be conditional, based on an applicant providing a recent copy of an acceptable driving record;
  • On-call work shifts. If this employee must be available on an on-call basis during certain days or weeks – on a regular schedule — be sure to note this since it lets those with unique family obligations (or physical limitations) know whether the job is still a desirable one for them.

If your company does federal contracting work – keep EEOC requirements in mind

When a business does this type of work, it must always note in any job ad that all applicants will receive full consideration, regardless of their color, race, sex, national origin or religion. Many companies simply note this at the end of their ads by indicating that they’re an EEO (Equal Employment Opportunity) Employer. 

Even some companies who aren’t required to include an EEOC statement include one so that their applicants will be fully aware that they’re encountered an employer dedicated to fair hiring from a fully diverse group of applicants.

Additional comments about legally risky, outdated jargon & online “keywords”

Remember to use gender-neutral labels like “salesperson” as opposed to salesman and “server” in place of waiter. Likewise, “general repair person” is better than “handyman.” It’s also preferable to indicate you’re seeking to fill a “part-time position” than to indicate that you’re looking for a college student.

Finally, give thought to obtaining direct advice – or even job-writing templates – from one of the major online job boards like Monster.com, Indeed.com or Careerbuilder.com. They can also help you with selecting the most useful “keywords” that you’ll want to include in your ad.

Please feel free to contact one of our Murray Lobb attorneys whenever you need any advice about how to properly attract and interact with job applicants – or if you need help with any employee management issues that may arise. Our firm can also supply you with any employee contracts and other general business documents.

Determining Fault After an Employee’s Accident in a Company Car

One of the most awkward moments for any worker is getting into a vehicle accident while driving a company car. Since every employee wants to be viewed as highly responsible, this type of event requires sincere humility while explaining the circumstances of the accident.

If the employee was clearly at fault and using the company car for personal reasons at the time the collision occurred – liability issues can quickly multiply – especially if a third party was injured.

Before noting some of the key factors that must be evaluated when this type of event occurs, here’s a quick review of some insurance policy definitions.

Insurance policies that may be involved when an employee has a vehicle accident

  • Commercial auto policy. The coverage or protection this type of policy offers to a company can be crucial following an accident. It’s designed to protect the business from having to cover all the personal injury expenses and property damage. Brokers often speak of this as a business auto or commercial auto policy;
  • A general liability policy. Most employers carry one of these because it offers protection against all kinds of third-party legal claims, including those that might be filed after a third party falls down and is injured on company property – or hurt during an auto accident caused by an employee driving a company car;
  • Worker’s compensation insurance. All employers of a certain size should carry this type of insurance that normally provides benefits to workers injured on the job – including those who were handling official business in a company car when a vehicle accident occurred;
  • A policy rider. An amendment to an insurance policy. Some employees who choose to use their personal cars for business add a special rider to their personal auto insurance policies to provide coverage if they get into an accident while handling company business. Depending on the employee’s relationship with the company, some employers will reimburse the employee for the added expense this type of rider adds to the employee’s basic auto insurance policy.

Once liability for the accident is determined, one or more of the policies referenced above will have to be used to cover all the injury expenses and property damage repairs.

The legal doctrine of respondeat superior and employer liability

When an employee is driving a company car at the time of an accident (while actively handling assigned business tasks) – that s/he did not personally cause – the employer will normally be responsible for paying for all the damages.  However, since various jurisdictions apply aspects of the respondeat superior doctrine differently, it’s important to check with your Houston business lawyer to find out exactly how this doctrine is applied in Texas.

Stated in general terms, respondeat superior usually indicates that the principal (employer) is normally responsible for most activities handled by the employee (agent).

One or more of the employer’s insurance policies (in addition to worker’s compensation), will normally cover medical expenses and the costs incurred due to property damage. However, insurance companies often quarrel over whether the employee was clearly handling business tasks at the time of the accident — and if s/he had current authorization to use the company vehicle.

Liability can shift when an employee was totally or partially responsible for the accident

The circumstances surrounding each accident will normally determine the exact percentage of damages that an employee must pay under his/her own policy. Whether any type of indemnity is offered to the employee usually depends on whether the third party involved caused the accident.

In most cases, an employee who caused a collision will be held fully responsible for all damages under his/her own personal auto accident policy.

However, when a third party caused the accident, there are still specific circumstances that will allow an employer to deny all liability. Several of these exceptions are set forth below.

  • The “frolic or detour” exception. If the employee was running a personal errand at the time the accident in the company car occurred, she must normally cover all the damages under her own personal auto accident policy;
  • The employee was under the influence of alcohol or drugs at the time of the accident. Once this has been conclusively established, the employer may be able to deny all liability;
  • The accident did not take place during normal business hours. However, there can be exceptions – like when a salesperson is traveling to his/her next sales destination on behalf of the company;
  • The employee was an independent contractor using his/her own vehicle. Potential liability for all types of vehicle accidents should be clearly spelled out in each employee’s company paperwork – before that individual can handle company business in any vehicle.

It’s always wise for an employee who was just in a company vehicle accident to request a timely meeting with company officials as soon as that person’s health allows. Everyone may benefit if a

compromise regarding liability can be reached – unless the employee’s behavior was clearly unacceptable.

If you have any questions about how your business or insurance provider should handle a specific type of accident involving a company car, please feel free to call one of our Murray Lobb attorneys. We can provide you with our legal opinion and possibly suggest legal paperwork you might want to have every employee sign before ever issuing any of them a company car for their use.

Key Issues Targeted by EEOC in Recent Lawsuits Filed Against Employers

Periodically reviewing the most recent cases filed by the EEOC (Equal Employment Opportunity Commission) against various companies can help remind your office of the federal employment rights that must be regularly extended to all job applicants and current employees.

Far too often, employers fail to protect workers against hostile work environments and many different forms of harassment and discrimination.  Employees being sexually or racially harassed can never do their best work. This also holds true for people mistreated due to physical disabilities, religious beliefs – or their national origin. These types of illegal activities are constantly monitored by the EEOC so that equal employment rights can be guaranteed to everyone trying to get hired or hold down a job.

What follows is a brief review of some recent cases filed by the EEOC against companies they believe have violated federal employment laws. While some of these actions have been resolved, others are still awaiting a final ruling.

New EEOC cases reveal the broad spectrum of employment rights regularly enforced

  • A Dallas pregnancy discrimination case was decided against the employer. A receptionist working for Smiley Dental Walnut spoke to human resources to inform them that she was pregnant. After being ordered to tell her supervisor this news, the young woman complied. During the conversation with her supervisor – who noted that she did not wish to keep training the young woman since she might leave relatively soon — the pregnant employee was fired.

The U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Texas, Dallas Division, ruled against the employer. Attempts to settle prior to litigation failed. Injunctive relief (sought to make sure the company never repeated this same type of illegal behavior in the future) was sought and awarded – along with back pay and other damages. The company was ordered to pay $20,000 to the wronged employee;

  • Walmart was ordered to pay $5.2 million for intentional discrimination against a disabled employee. The mistreated worker had dutifully worked around his developmental disability, deafness, and visual difficulties for 16 years. However, a new store manager came in and demanded that new medical paperwork be submitted to document all the employee’s disabilities. The disabled employee was then suspended temporarily from his job.     

However, once the requested paperwork was produced, Walmart cut off further communications with the disabled man — basically resulting in his termination. The EEOC prevailed in this case in which $5 million of the award was for punitive damages;

  • Two female nurses filed an EEOC complaint about unequal pay. The women had job experience equal to that of a male nurse – yet the women were paid less. All three nurses complained about this issue. The EEOC won the case on behalf of the female nurses, noting the importance of closing the pay gap that often works against women in this country;
  • A case was filed involving discrimination based on national origin and religion. Three Pennsylvania employees from Puerto Rico were working for a caster and wheel company when they were subjected to workplace harassment based on their national origin and their religious (Pentecostal) beliefs. Oddly enough, it was the plant manager who was making the derogatory remarks when the harassed employees decided to report his illegal and upsetting behavior. The three employees were then subjected to retaliation (in the form of lesser work assignments) for complaining about the way they were being treated.

The EEOC stated in its pleadings that company managers should always act respectfully as role models—and never be the ones who harass their own employees;                                          

  • A sexual harassment lawsuit was filed on behalf of two female employees. The EEOC alleged in its lawsuit that the defendant hospitality companies created an abusive and hostile working environment for two of its female employees. The women complained about sexually rude comments and behavior directed toward them by their manager.

When the employees complained to their supervisors and others, nothing was done to improve their situation. In this case, a request was made for both compensatory and punitive damages – along with back pay for the two women. This suit is still pending;

  • A disability discrimination case was filed based on the way a hearing impaired job applicant was treated. When a problem arose during the hiring process related to the applicant’s hearing disability, the employer failed to accommodate her reasonable request to simply be interviewed in person and not over the phone. The company never responded to the job applicant’s email proposing this simple alternative.

Instead, four other applicants (who didn’t require any type of accommodation) were then interviewed and one of them was chosen for the job opening. The EEOC lawsuit requests lost wages, punitive and compensatory damages – and injunctive relief to prevent the employer from repeating this type of discrimination against other job applicants (or employees) who have disabilities in the future;

  • A racial slurs and harassment case. A man hired as a deckhand by a New Orleans transportation company was subjected to offensive racial epithets and conduct. When the man asked for help in stopping this behavior, the situation did not improve. Soon thereafter, a rope tied in the form of a noose was dropped near this harassed man on the deck where he was working.

The EEOC described these wrongful acts as “deeply offensive.” The government is seeking injunctive relief against the transportation company – along with compensatory and punitive damages — and any other relief the court decides is necessary.

Each of these new cases and decisions document how common intentional acts of workplace discrimination still are in this country. All employers should consider requiring annual training for every employee in hopes of seriously discouraging all forms of workplace discrimination and harassment.

Should you need help interpreting any of the federal (state or local) laws that are designed to protect employee rights, please contact one of our Murray Lobb attorneys. We’ll be glad to help you analyze any problems that you may have — or help you draft any new workplace contracts or employee handbook sections related to this (or any other employment law) topic.

Overview of Small Business Administration Online Courses

Ever since our government created the SBA (Small Business Administration) back in 1953, it’s been working hard to promote, assist and protect America’s small business interests. Chief among its goals is to help entrepreneurs as they try to create and “grow” new companies.

During recent years, the SBA has been offering online courses that can help people focus in on creating viable business plans – while also securing adequate funding for their initial marketing and other needs. Whether your business is still in the planning stages – or already gaining traction – you can benefit by taking several of these courses.

SBA classes can greatly help many business owners

  • The All Small Mentor-Protégé Program. Like most of the courses offered, this one allows you to glance at a course transcript or outline before starting the class. This 30-minute program is designed to help entrepreneurs decide if they’re businesses are ready to sell goods or services to the federal government. If you believe your business is ready, you can take this course and use the certification of completion while applying for acceptance into this mentor-protégé program;
  • Business opportunities. This 30-minute class (offered on a self-paced basis), helps entrepreneurs learn how federal contract procedures work and what they must first do before trying to sell goods to the federal government;
  • A course on gaining a competitive advantage for your company. This SBA class teaches students how to accurately evaluate their competition, create a brand, seek out potential customers and decide how best to set prices for their goods and services;
  • Financing your business. There are many ways to come up with the money you’ll need besides funding it yourself or obtaining a bank loan. This class explains the basics facts about venture capital, crowdfunding, angel investors, grants and other sources. You’ll also gain a better idea how to figure out your exact start-up costs and other expenses;
  • Legal requirements for a small business. This course explains many basic aspects of employment law that must be understood before trying to start a company. One key topic looks at how you must responsibly hire and fire employees. Be sure to speak with your Houston business law attorney during the earliest stages of starting your company to make sure you’re complying with all applicable state, local and federal laws;
  • Social media marketing. Every small business owner must learn how to properly market goods and service to the public using social media platforms like Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, LinkedIn, YouTube, Tumblr and others. This course also teaches students how to reach their prime or target audiences based on such factors as age and location;
  • Growing an established company.  At some point, most companies find themselves facing unexpected competition or a change in market forces that makes them need to retool their approach to winning new customers. This class will help you determine if your company is ready to expand and how to carry out that goal. It also teaches important growth strategies;
  • A course on buying a company already in business. Terms like due diligence are explained so that students will understand the critical need to learn all they can about any business before buying it,
  • The special cybersecurity needs of small businesses. This course helps acquaint owners with some of the ways they can try to protect themselves against major cyber threats that can take down websites and otherwise disrupt normal business transactions. There’s also a related class that describes useful ways to prevent general crimes from being committed against your company.

All the courses referenced above may prove useful to a large percentage of new businesses (or those needing to reinvent themselves). The following brief synopses are related to classes created for unique groups of entrepreneurs.

SBA classes designed for the needs of specific individuals and groups

  • Special contracting opportunities for veteran entrepreneurs. Nearly one in ten U. S. businesses are owned by military veterans. Since these men and women often face special burdens after serving our country, the government has created unique programs to help them find profitable ways to support themselves and provide jobs to others;
  • A course designed for Spanish-speaking young people. Titled Jovenes Emprendedores, this class provides key guidance for those who need business training materials taught and presented in Spanish). There is also a class designed for young entrepreneurs who are native English speakers;
  • Business development class for Native American businesses. Students in this class will learn more about the 8 (a) Business Development Program that’s been specially set up to help many small business owners facing economic disadvantages;
  • Entrepreneurship program for women over 50. Given the high number of seniors now needing to remain in the workforce past normal retirement age, this course is perfect for older women wanting to get new businesses off to a good start. Those who take this course may also want to review the materials designed for the more general WOSB (women-owned small business) Advantage class.

The courses referenced above are just a sampling of the roughly 63 free classes available to anyone who has 30 minutes (or more) to spend mastering these core topics. Should you decide to contact the SBA directly or online, they may be able to provide you with additional online and community resources that can help you get your business off to a promising start.

Please feel free to contact one of our Murray Lobb attorneys while trying to start up a new company – or purchasing one that’s already helping customers. We appreciate the opportunity to help all our clients succeed in all their new business endeavors.

Update: Department of Labor Issues New Rule on Overtime Pay

The Department of Labor issued a final rule in September of 2019 that could allow an additional 1.3 million more American workers to become eligible to receive overtime pay. This new rule becomes effective on January 1, 2020.

One key focus of the new rule is to update the earning thresholds that exempt certain professional, executive and administrative employees from the FLSA (Fair Labor Standards Act) minimum wage and overtime pay guidelines. The new rule is also designed to allow employers to count portions of some bonuses and commissions toward meeting the required salary level.

These adjustments are being made to recognize the increase in employee earnings that have occurred since these salary thresholds were last reviewed in 2004.

Earning levels and other specific issues addressed by the new DOL rule

  • Changes are being made to the “standard salary level.” At present, the enforced earning level is $455 per week – and that’s being raised to $684 per week (or $35,568 for an entire year);
  • There’s an increase in the total annual compensation requirements for workers categorized as “highly compensated employees.” The current enforced level of $100,000 a year is now being raised to $107,432 annually;
  • Employers can now count nondiscretionary incentive payments, bonuses and commissions paid at least once annually. These sums can now be added to help satisfy as much as 10% of what’s now known as the standard salary level – recognizing how pay practices are evolving;
  • Salary levels have now been revised for specific groups of workers. These include people who labor in U. S. territories – or individuals employed by the motion picture industry.

Some of the many earlier overtime pay guidelines that still apply

  • Unlimited overtime hours.  The FLSA (Fair Labor Standards Act) still allows exempt employees age 16 and older to work an unlimited number of overtime hours during any one workweek;
  • Timely payment of overtime. Employers must pay for all hours worked, including overtime, on each regular pay day;
  • When overtime pay is required. Once a non-exempt worker has put in at least 40 hours during any one calendar workweek (which can begin on any day of the week), the overtime pay rate applies.

If you have any questions about how the new DOL overtime pay rule may affect your workforce, please give one of our Murray Lobb attorneys a call. We’re also available to provide legal advice on many other important topics – and can draft any contracts or other documents you may need.

Properly Handling Background Record Checks of Potential Employees

All companies must proceed cautiously while trying to create safe, productive and pleasant work environments. The best approach is to develop standard procedures for running background checks and investigations for all applicants who will be handling similar tasks — without regard to any discriminatory traits or characteristics.

First and foremost, you must obtain each job applicant’s written permission to run checks on their job and educational records, criminal background history and financial credit status. Should any of the information you obtain make you no longer wish to consider a specific job applicant, you must inform that person about each report’s negative findings – since all potential employees have the right to refute and correct such data.

Always be sure to also treat all applicants with equal respect and remind them that you’re simply trying to learn all you can about your top applicants. And be sure to state in writing that providing false information can cause individuals to be immediately dropped from further consideration – or be fired in the future when such misinformation is discovered.

Here’s additional information about the types of errors that can appear in background checks, how you might allow job candidates to respond to negative findings — and tips on exercising special caution when sensitive data appears on either sex offender registries or terror watch lists.

Types of negative information & errors that may be uncovered during background checks

Hopefully, most of your searches will just reveal that your applicants have provided their correct names, full address histories, all job information for recent years, accurate Social Security numbers and other basic data. However, chances are that at least some of your potential employees will need to explain about one or more of the following findings.

  • Past arrests or conviction records. Always pay close attention to the types of behavior or crimes involved, when the events occurred and how (if true) that history might affect your work environment. If you still wish to hire a person with some type of negative arrest or conviction, remember that you have a legal duty to create a safe work environment for all your employees. Also, bear in mind that future claims of negligent hiring could prove very costly to your company.
  • Fraudulent or grossly misleading information about the applicant’s academic background or work history. As noted above, make sure that all your application forms clearly indicate that providing false information on such forms (or on a resume) can be immediate grounds for dismissing an applicant from further consideration. Should you believe that any applicant may have simply made a typographical or innocent error on the forms, always allow the person to provide corrected information. Just be sure to respond to the discovery of such false information in the same manner for every applicant;
  • Misleading or inaccurate driving record information. If you’re hiring someone to deliver packages or goods for you – or drive others around on your company’s behalf, you better make sure they have an excellent driving record.
  • A very poor credit score, a bankruptcy or other signs of major financial problems. Always be sensitive and careful when asking applicants to explain this type of information;
  • The person’s name turns up on a sex offender registry or a terrorist watch list. Given the number of people who are burdened with very common names, always reveal what you’ve learned to the individual in a calm manner, preferably with at least one other human resources staff member present. If you still want to hire a person whose name was on one of these lists, always first speak with your Houston employment law attorney.

Your lawyer can tell you how you should go about carefully determining a person’s correct identity and if it’s too risky to hire someone. It may even be necessary to contact the Department of Homeland Security if the person is listed on a terrorist watch list. (Do keep in mind that even the government knows that it can be very time-consuming to remove a name wrongfully added to a terrorist watch list);

It’s crucial to maintain a standard of fairness that applies to all applicants

Be sure your company’s hiring policies provide specific time limits on when applicants must provide you with corrected information after background checks turn up negative or disturbing information. Always apply that same standard to all applicants. If someone needs more time, you should only allow a one-time extension that applies equally to others.

How long must you keep all job application forms and background check information?

The EEOC (Equal Opportunity Commission), the Department of Labor and the FTC (Federal Trade Commission) each provide slightly different guidelines on how long certain records should be kept. Overall, it’s a good idea to keep a copy of all application materials and background information for about two years. Of course, if any job applicant or employee files a lawsuit against your company, that person’s records should be kept until all legal proceedings and appeals have come to an end.

Make sure all employee records are stored in a restricted area where only one or two senior human resource officials have access to them. Once it’s time to destroy the records, it’s wise to carefully shred, burn or pulverize the data so that the material can no longer be read.

Of course, some employers keep all resumes and job application forms in case they later have problems with an employee — or come across information that indicates that the background check failed to disclose fraudulent claims were contained in those documents. Some firms just scan all such data into secure databases.

Since credit background checks are governed by the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA), be sure you understand the terms of that legislation and how it impacts your specific workplace. Also, always keep in mind that the State of Texas also has laws and regulations that can impact how your company handles background checks and employee records. It’s always wise to periodically touch base with your lawyer to find out if any of these laws have recently changed.

Please feel free to contact one of our Murray Lobb attorneys so we can provide you with the legal guidance you may need while hiring employees or simply running your business. We can also provide you with any contracts you may need — or review the contents of your current employee handbook.

The SBA Suggests 10 Key Steps for Starting a New Business

Once you’ve decided to start a new business, it can be tempting to simply moved forward with various tasks as they come to mind. While this may work for a few entrepreneurs, it’s always best to create an organized plan of action so you won’t waste time and cause problems for yourself that could easily have been avoided.

Fortunately, the SBA (Small Business Administration) provides excellent online materials that can help you plan the most useful way to start a new company – or expand the current reach of an existing one. Here’s a brief review of the ten important tasks that should normally be addressed first as you launch a new business.

The key steps for creating a solid foundation for your new business

  1. Decide where to locate your company. Prior to starting any market research, you’ll need to look at several cities to decide upon the best location for your business. This decision must be partly based on if you’ll be selling goods and services to your customers from a brick-and-mortar storefront or office – or if you’ll just be contacting potential customers on the phone or over the Internet. Be sure to select a location where many well-qualified job applicants live – as well as a city and state with reasonable business taxes;
  1. Develop a reliable market research plan. Once you’re certain about the goods or services your new business will sell, you must conduct market research to verify that there’s a definite need for what you’ll be selling in a specific location. This activity also involves identifying your potential customers and all known competitors; 
  2. Create a viable business plan. Most people starting a new business choose between a traditional business plan or a lean one for a basic start-up company. If you need to borrow money to finance your company, you’ll almost certainly have to provide a lender with a traditional business plan.

The traditional plan is normally very comprehensive – it describes your specific goods and services, provides a mission statement about what you seek to accomplish in the long run and names the initial team of professionals who will be running the company. It also states where the business will be located and how many employees you’ll need to hire. A traditional business plan should also describe the business structure you’ll be using, who will be handling specific tasks – and it should review your market analysis. Initial financial projections or earnings for the company should also be included.

In contrast, a lean start-up business plan may simply describe your goods and services, provide a statement about who will be running the company and state who you believe will be your most likely customers. It should also contain information about how you’ll initially finance the company and where it will be located;

  1. Make sure you have enough initial funding for the company. You and your business partners or advisors must determine how much money you’ll need to start your business. If you cannot raise this money among your business partners, then may have to try and obtain funds from venture capitalists or request a small business loan from a bank or through SBA resources. Other options include raising capital through crowdfunding or other online resources;
  2. Select the best business structure for your company. While many people run sole proprietorships if they’ll be handling all of the major company tasks themselves, others choose between forming such structures as partnerships, limited liability companies (LLCs) — or some type of corporation or cooperative;
  3. Decide upon the best name for your company. It’s a good idea to brainstorm with your partners or investors since you want to try and choose a name that clearly reflects the nature or “brand” of your business – as well as its spirit. Be aware that one of your first tasks will be to make sure the name you select is original and that it’s not already being used by anyone else;
  1. Be sure to register and protect your business name. After you’ve chosen the best name for your company, you’ll need to take steps to protect that name by properly registering it. Keep in mind that you may also need to register any trademark you’ll be using. Since additional ways of protecting your company name may also be required, you should always discuss this topic with your Houston business law attorney;
  2. You must request state and federal tax IDs. You will need to obtain an EIN (employer identification number) for many reasons. For example, you must have an EIN to open a bank account for your company and to pay taxes (among other tasks). Depending on the different states where your company will be operating, you may also need to obtain one or more state tax IDs;
  3. Obtain all required licenses and permits. Your specific type of business activity and where you’ll be working will determine the types of permits and licenses you must obtain, if any;
  4. Be sure to open one or more business accounts for your company. These most often include checking and savings accounts, credit card accounts and a merchant services account. Depending on the nature of your business and its initial size, you may be able to simply start with a checking account and then open other accounts as the need arises.

Please feel free to contact one of our Murray Lobb attorneys for legal advice as you address any or all of the various steps named above while starting a new business. We’ve had the opportunity to help many clients establish a wide variety of successful businesses in the past and are prepared to provide you will all the guidance you may need.

Designating a Guardian for Your Children in a Will

If you’re a parent with children who haven’t yet reached the age of majority, you need to create a Will that designates a guardian to step in and look after them if you suddenly pass away. If you fail to provide for your kids in this manner, a court will usually appoint someone to serve in this role – especially if your former spouse is deceased or incapable of handling this responsibility.

A list of traits and abilities a responsible guardian should have are set forth below. If your children have entered their teens at the time when no parent remains alive to care for them, the courts will normally consider their preferences for a guardian at that time.

What are some key considerations when choosing a guardian for your children?

  • It’s often best to choose someone already known to your kid(s) or who has a definite gift for caregiving. This might be one of your parents, a sibling or a very close and trusted friend. Always be sure to obtain this person’s advance permission to name him (or her) in your Will before doing so. If you prefer, you can also designate a married couple as co-guardians;
  • If possible, try to choose a person who already lives in the same city as you — or who is willing to relocate there in the future. It can be very comforting to children if they’re allowed to remain in their same school district. If you can’t find someone who lives nearby, be aware that it may prove a bit expensive for an out-of-state guardian to handle legal matters for the children in a different state. Choosing a local guardian can prevent this type of problem;
  • Give serious thought to choosing a guardian who will fully support your faith beliefs and core ethical values. It’s always best to appoint a person who’s eager to help your children grow up in the faith community you prefer – and who will daily enforce the moral teachings you treasure most;
  • Think about the financial responsibilities involved. Hopefully, you’ll have provided well for your children’s future with life insurance and other funds prior to your death. However, regardless of how much money you’ve put in an account for your kids, you’ll need a guardian who can responsibly handle money. If you do not know of anyone with strong financial skills, you can still choose a person to serve as the caregiving guardian – and designate a different individual to manage the children’s financial resources;
  • What should you do if you do not want your estranged spouse to become the guardian after you pass away? Your Houston estate planning attorney may advise you to write and sign a letter documenting your reasons – and to attach relevant police reports or court documents to the letter. You can then give that letter to your named guardian so that it can be presented to the court after you’ve passed away;
  • How should you proceed if you have children living with you from different marriages? It may be necessary to name more than one guardian for the children. Your main goal should be to keep as many of the kids together as possible. However, you must be realistic about how many children your named guardian can handle;
  • Give some thought to the age of the person you’d like to name. If your parent or another desired guardian is still in good health, you may decide to go ahead and name that person now and simply revisit your decision within the next five years (or when that guardian’s health suddenly declines.) If you are naming a much older person as guardian, be sure to also name a secondary guardian who is willing to step in if the first one cannot serve in this capacity after you pass away. In fact, it’s always a good idea to have a back-up guardian named in your Will;
  • Remember to name every child you want to be cared for by your guardian. It’s never wise to think that a court will assume that all your kids are covered if you only name one or two. Also, extended family members might step in and try to contest your choice if every child isn’t named individually.

Before finalizing any Will that designates one or more guardians, be sure to discuss your choices with your older children. Also, make sure each named guardian is truly interested in helping you by taking on such a demanding assignment.

Please feel free to contact one of our Murray Lobb attorneys so we can prepare a Will that designates a guardian for your children. We’ll be happy to answer any additional questions you may have about this critical task. Most parents gain a greater sense of peace once they’ve legally provided for these important caregiving needs for their children.

Handling Your Adult Child’s Estate in Texas

Losing a child of any age remains one of life’s most difficult challenges. When that child is an adult, you may often need legal advice on how to manage any estate left behind, even if it’s rather limited. Now that so many Americans are living well into their 70s and 80s, the chances of losing an adult child are growing.

One study found that 11.5 percent of people age 50 or older have lost at least one adult child. That likelihood of loss is even higher for African Americans – 16.7 percent of them have lost an adult child. Furthermore, the older you get, the sense of loss can be even harder to cope with since adult children are often the closest caregivers of their aging parents.

Here’s a look at some of the legal questions you’ll need to address after losing an adult child.

Issues Surviving Parents May Need to Face After an Adult Child Passes Away:

  • Did your son or daughter live with and leave behind a spouse or partner? If so, calmly reach out to that person to find out if there’s a Will naming the personal representative of the estate. If your child didn’t have a Will or named someone else as the executor of their Will, you’ll need to interact very sensitively with that person. When you contact your Houston estate planning lawyer, be prepared to indicate your adult child’s marital status at the time of death;
  • Did your adult child have any children? It’s important to stay on good terms with your loved one’s surviving spouse or partner since visitation rights and overall family harmony may depend upon your relationship with that person. (Note: If the surviving spouse or partner has any major substance abuse problems, be sure to share that information with your lawyer. We can explain pertinent child custody and adoption laws, if necessary);
  • Did your son or daughter own considerable land or personal property? Your attorney can help you try to prevent anyone from giving away or disposing of such property before the estate can be probated – or passed on according to your adult child’s estate plan. If you’ve been named the personal representative, obtain a copy of the Will as soon as possible. If no one is living in your adult child’s former house or apartment, be sure someone visits soon to look for pets needing immediate care, valuables that must be secured and vehicles that must be locked and placed in a garage;
  • Contacting your adult child’s employer. If you were named as your adult child’s personal representative, you’ll soon need to contact that employer to find out what employee assets may still be held in a 401k or other account. Likewise, you’ll want to find out if any other benefits are still owing to your child – and if s/he held any type of insurance policy through the employer;
  • What should you do about burial, cremation and related issues? Always try to honor the instructions in your deceased child’s Will or other legal documents. If you can’t find a Will, then work with any surviving spouse/partner and other family members to handle this matter in keeping with your family’s faith practices or general traditions;
  • Do you know what to expect under Texas law if your adult child died intestate – without a Will or some other type of estate plan?  Your Houston estate planning attorney can explain how Texas courts address this type of situation. We can also inform you about how estates are handled by probate courts and how you should manage other tasks that are often required after losing an adult child.

Please know that since our firm has worked with many clients grieving over the loss of loved ones. We’ll provide our legal advice in the most caring manner possible. When you contact one of our Murray Lobb attorneys, we’ll be ready to provide you with simple steps to take so you can concentrate on obtaining comfort from family and friends.