Is Notice to the Address of Record in the Loan Agreement always Sufficient? We'll See…

Many years of past precedent had established that a lenders notice to the debtor’s address of record in the Loan Agreement was almost always sufficient. However, one case from the Texas Supreme Court, and another in which Petition for Review has been filed may change established law.

In July 2015, in a landlord verses tenant case, (“Katy Venture v. Cremona Bistro”) the Texas Supreme Court ruled that because the landlord had used an outdated “registered” address even though it knew of a new “unofficial” mailing address, a fact issue was presented to defeat Landlord’s Motion for Summary Judgment in a bill of review proceeding after default judgment was entered against the Tenant.

Following the “Katy Venture” decision, the Fort Worth Court of Appeals, in a Lender verses Guarantor case, the Court held that the Guarantor raised a genuine issue of material fact to defeat a summary judgment. The Court held that because some summary judgment evidence exists that the Bank knew the Guarantor’s current address but nonetheless utilized an outdated “official” address in its certificate of last known address, a fact issue exists precluding summary judgment. This is true even assuming the Bank conclusively established the Guarantor’s negligence in failing to update his contractually-agreed-to address for notice.

Petition for review has been filed to the Texas Supreme Court. We’ll see in the coming year how the law of adequate notice evolves.

Practice point: Send notices to the borrowers and guarantors “official” address of record, but also send notice to ay other addresses which the bank knows, or with reasonable diligence and investigation should have known, where the borrowers and guarantors receive their mail or reside.