Purchasing a Texas Franchise or Company Already in Business

Since only about twenty percent (20%) of new businesses survive past their first year, many savvy entrepreneurs prefer to buy a company or franchise that’s already up and running. That often proves wise – if the purchaser is willing to complete all the necessary research to make sure the current signs of financial success aren’t threatened by factors that no one is willing to disclose.

To make sure you handle all crucial due diligence inquiries properly, consider asking your experienced Houston business lawyers for the help and insights they can readily offer as you explore all the possible investment risks.

Once you’ve carefully answered the following questions — and analyzed the various concerns mentioned — you should be better prepared to decide whether to purchase a specific business or franchise.

Important business questions to answer – and key concerns to evaluate

  1. Is the product or service a good match for your interests and experience? People are often most successful when they feel passionate about the business they’re running. Should you be entering a field that’s unfamiliar to you, be prepared to hire different consultants as needed. Of course, if you’re buying into a franchise, the corporate headquarters will usually offer valuable training and products to help you;
  2. Why is the business for sale now? Is the current owner truly planning to retire or move closer to family across the country? Ask the current owner very direct questions. If you’re trying to buy a franchise, you’ll need to obtain a copy of the Franchise Disclosure Document. (This was formerly known as the Uniform Franchise Offering Circular or UFOC). It will fully inform you about a franchise’s financial, legal and personnel history;
  3. What business location is best for you? Be sure to ask the current owner to provide you with a breakdown of the business’ most regular customers. Are they residents of nearby neighborhoods — or simply commuters who work in the area? What types of seasonal downturns, if any, should you expect in business profits? Be ready to purchase zip code-based demographic reports that can provide you with information about your current customer base. There are also different types of geographic-information-system software programs that can help you evaluate consumer trends tied to local neighborhoods and the most recent census. (Always be sure your business location can offer adequate parking);
  4. Do you have adequate financial knowledge and good funding sources for your purchase? Be sure to have your Houston attorney review all the general business or franchise contracts tendered to you. Only work with a trustworthy financial consultant who can help you review each company’s current operating expenses. Also, obtain the help of a qualified lender you’ve dealt with in the past – or someone who comes highly recommended by business contacts you’ve known for years;
  5. Determine if you’re personally willing to take a “hands-on” approach to running the franchise or business. Be prepared to pay good wages to any managers you must hire. Good ones can “make or break” a successful franchise – or any other type of business. Be sure to tell any impressive managers and employees you meet that you may keep many current staff members on in the future – once you’ve reviewed all employee files;
  6. Be sure to personally observe the current quality of customer service. Ask about the specific training that helped produce the successful parts of it. Be prepared to provide an employee orientation and training program that honestly promises good wages and job benefits so employees will know how important they are to you;
  7. Network with similar local business owners and managers in the area. If necessary, consider taking one or more of them to lunch or dinner so you can pose insightful questions about their most difficult daily challenges doing business in the area;
  8. Find out what types of marketing plans are currently in place and if you can expect any corporate support in this regard. If you aren’t buying a franchise, contact the nearest small business administration (SBA) office to see what types of marketing and business planning programs they can offer to you;
  9. Plan on developing some type of regular community “presence” that can benefit everyone. This may take the form of financially sponsoring one or two local children’s sports teams. When you pay for the equipment and help secure uniforms – often emblazoned with your company name or logo — everyone will likely benefit;
  10. After you’ve completed all due diligence inquiries, visit pertinent local government offices. Check to see what types of new building permits have been issued – and find out if any new zoning changes will soon be enforced that could negatively affect the business you’re hoping to purchase.

Finally, read all you can about what has helped so many successful businesses and franchises remain profitable over recent decades. The more you learn about each of these companies, the more likely you’ll be to succeed in running your own franchise or new company.

At Murray Lobb, we’re always ready to help clients who may soon buy an operating business or franchise. We can guide you through all the detailed due diligence inquiries – and draft all the contracts and other documents you’ll need.

Key Traits New Business Partners Must Readily Offer

Although only 20% of new businesses fail during their first year, roughly half of them cease operations during their first five years. Frequently, the biggest problems develop because the founders failed to choose the best group of partners available to start the company.

Each potential business partner’s personality traits, ethical values, passion and proven skills must be carefully evaluated. Only then can everyone work hard together to define and establish high performance standards while carefully marketing the company’s goods and services to the public.

Here’s a general overview of the partner skills and traits that some business experts believe can provide a new company with a strong chance to succeed for many years to come.

Top skills and traits your partners must have and be willing to share with each other

  1. Trustworthiness, discretion and moral integrity. In addition to partners whose references say they’re definitely trustworthy– you also need people who have an innate need to treat others fairly and want to act as good role models for ethical business behavior;
  2. Keen intelligence and a proven track record of success. Ask all potential partners about their past business successes and failures. Find out if they have truly learned from all past experiences. The crucible of the workplace often provides the best measure of a potential partner’s ability to succeed in a new business venture. Look for highly intelligent partners who can readily respect other people’s creativity — while still bringing their own fresh, original ideas to the table;
  3. Able to maintain a consistently positive, “can do” attitude. Nothing can bring a business to its knees quicker than one or two partners who keep forecasting doom. Be sure each person will remain actively involved in all key company decisions and “go the extra mile” without being asked to do so on many occasions;
  4. Able to display strong, supportive communication skills. All companies need strong communicators who can create proper standards for respectfully interacting with others. These standards must apply to all in-person meetings, phone conversations, the exchange of emails and the use of social media. Each partner must also clearly communicate his or her support for others within the company;
  5. Can offer unique skills that help balance out those offered by the other partners. In addition to someone who can handle complex accounting matters, you’ll also need partners who are strong planners, innovative geniuses, marketing wizards and product (and service) development experts. You’ll also need at least one partner who maintains strong connections to industry experts who can provide your company with timely advice, crucial consultants and other contacts over the years;
  6. Can remain open-minded and is willing to constructively resolve conflicts with others. Always learn all you can about each potential new partner’s openness to the ideas of others and ability to compromise on matters. Also try to evaluate the person’s mature ability to acknowledge personal mistakes – and learn from them. You don’t need any partners who constantly try and prove themselves “right” about everything;
  7. Has the ability to handle different levels of risk and uncertainty. This may be the hardest trait of all to discern – but it’s well worth finding out if someone can remain fully productive – even when unexpected business challenges arise. Always ask about past business difficulties and how the partner candidate personally responded to them. Resilience in the face of change is a key trait of all successful business partners.

Once you’ve selected all your partners, you’ll need to meet with your Houston business lawyer to draw up a partnership agreement that clearly addresses such matters as each person’s roles and responsibilities, how (and when) everyone will be compensated – and how the company must respond when anyone chooses to leave the partnership.

Please contact our Murray Lobb office so we can provide you with the guidance you’ll need when forming any new business. Our firm’s lengthy experience working with professionals in numerous fields allows us to provide you with the help you’ll need.

Administering the Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA)

Prior to the passage of the FMLA in 1993, American workers had few options when they needed extra time off from work due to their own serious medical conditions and accidents – or those of immediate family members. In fact, workers often had to use up all their vacation and sick leave benefits, if entitled to any, and then worry about their job security if they needed more time off. (However, eligible women could seek the special help offered by the 1978 Pregnancy Discrimination Act). 

Fortunately, the Family Medical Leave Act is still helping many 21st century workers address critical family caregiving duties and remains one of the signature pieces of legislation from the Clinton era.

Here’s a brief overview of specific provisions of the act that can help your qualified workers.

What basic opportunities does the FMLA offer qualified employees?

If a worker meets the minimum qualifications referenced below, it’s possible to take up to twelve (12) weeks of unpaid leave during a calendar year to take care of seriously ill family members, new children or the individual’s own major medical condition.

In 2008, the Family Medical Leave Act was updated so that qualified workers could also take time off work to take care of immediate family members who became very ill (or were seriously injured) while serving in the military.

The FMLA guarantees that qualified workers can take the extended time off work without having to worry about losing their jobs, their seniority or their employer-provided health care insurance.

Which types of employees are qualified to use the FMLA?

  • Those who have employers with 50 or more workers on the payroll for at least 20 workweeks during the preceding or current calendar year. A worker may still qualify even if all the 50 workers aren’t working at the same site – if they work within a 75-mile radius of one another;
  • Those who have worked for their employer for a minimum of 12 months, for a total of at least 1,250 hours. This means that many part-time workers may not qualify for FMLA leave. However, there are special rules that may apply to workers who are teachers, are highly paid – or are flight crew members of airlines;
  • Employees taking time off from jobs to handle their own “serious health conditions” – or those of covered family members. This time may also be used to take care of a new child or a servicemember in the immediate family who has been wounded.

Note:  Now that same-sex marriage is legal in all 50 states, LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender) individuals can also qualify like other workers to take care of their family members.

General questions often raised about the FMLA by employers and employees

Question 1:   Can the leave time requested be intermittent during a calendar year?

Answer 1:     Yes, if all the time that’s taken is counted toward the maximum amount of time off

                     allowed (12 weeks).

Question 2:  What government agency oversees and administers the FMLA for all federal

                     employees – as well as all state and local government workers and private

                     employees?

Answer 2:   The U. S. Department of Labor’s Wage and Hour Division. This is noted in Fact

                   Sheet #77B entitled, “Protection for Individuals Under the FMLA.”

Question 3: Are all workers qualified to take time off from their jobs under the FMLA entitled

                     to receive pay while away from work?

Answer 3:    No. The FMLA doesn’t require employers to pay qualified employees while they’re

                    taking this type of leave. However, it’s up to your employer to let you make a claim

                    for regular vacation time, sick leave or annual time off.

Question 4: Can a qualified worker ever be granted more than 12 weeks of paid or unpaid

                     FMLA leave in one year?

Answer 4:   An exception only exists for qualified family caregivers of wounded

                    servicemembers. They’re allowed to take up to 26 weeks off from their jobs in a

                    given calendar year.

Question 5: Can a qualified worker request more than 12 weeks off under the FMLA to take care

                    of a newborn – or a newly adopted child?

Answer 5:   In general, the answer is “No.” However, individual states can pass their own

                   versions of the FMLA and provide somewhat different benefits. To date, the Texas

                   Workforce Commission says that Texas has not passed such legislation.

Although the Family Medical Leave Act is a straightforward piece of legislation, it’s been updated with new rules and regulations and interpreted by the courts. Therefore, it’s usually wise for employers to ask their Houston employment lawyer for help if they have any specific questions about properly handling FMLA issues.

Please feel free to contact Murray Lobb so we can help explain any specific aspects of the FMLA to you as you provide its benefits to your employees. We’re always available to research any questions you may have.

Most Common Hiring Discrimination Complaints

In a work world where the average tenure with any given employer is declining, many companies must routinely advertise and fill both new and established jobs. Yet as common as this process has become, every employer must periodically stop and re-evaluate how all job applications are being reviewed, skills tests are being administered and interviews are being granted and conducted.

After all, implicit bias (discriminatory hiring) remains a constant threat to maintaining an even playing field for all job applicants. And though most Texas employees are hired on an “at-will” basis, (allowing them to leave when they choose – and be fired without notice or cause), certain federal, state and local laws forbidding hiring discrimination must still be obeyed.

The most critical laws protecting employees against discrimination are set forth below, followed by examples of the types of hiring questions employers should avoid. Finally, the roles played by the TWC (Texas Workforce Commission) and the EEOC (Equal Employment Opportunity Commission) regarding employee complaints are also briefly noted.

Federal, state and local laws provide many anti-discrimination protections to Texas workers

Both federal laws and Texas statutes have been passed providing job applicants and employees with protections against discrimination on the following grounds.

  • Race
  • National origin
  • Color
  • Religion
  • Sex (including various medical conditions directly related to pregnancy)
  • Age (40 and older)
  • Genetic testing information
  • Disability

Federal law also provides specific employment discrimination protection to applicants who may not be actual U. S. citizens.

Federal laws and related regulations designed to protect workers against discrimination

  • Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Title VII). This law was later amended to include The Pregnancy Discrimination Act
  • The Equal Pay Act of 1963 (EPA)
  • The Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967
  • Title I of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA)
  • Sections 102 and 103 of the Civil Rights Act of 1991
  • Sections 501 and 505 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973
  • GINA – The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008

Many of the legal rights guaranteed to Texas workers under the federal laws referenced above are also protected (and set forth) in Chapter 21 of the Texas Labor Code. Various Texas cities, including both Houston and Austin, have passed additional anti-discrimination laws to protect their residents with unique sexual orientation and gender identity issues. (Additional information about protecting employee rights is set forth on our Texas Governor’s website.)

Here’s some additional, pragmatic information for handling the job application process.

Company interviewers must carefully avoid asking job applicants these types of questions

While the following list is not intended to be comprehensive, it should heighten your awareness of how careful you must be when trying to learn more about applicants who may have certain special needs or limitations that are not directly related to legitimate job requirements.

  • Do you have any disability? (However, if the applicant has a visually obvious disability — or has voluntarily disclosed one – you can normally ask if any special job accommodations are necessary or required);
  • Are you currently taking any medications that might impair your ability to perform the assigned tasks as described?
  • Have you needed to file any workers compensation claims in the past?
  • Are you pregnant – or planning to have a child during the coming year?
  • Have you obtained the results from any genetic tests during the past 10 years that indicate your likelihood of developing cancer (or another debilitating condition)?
  • Have you ever suffered a heart attack or stroke? Do you have any close blood relatives who have suffered from either of these medical problems?
  • Do you currently suffer from depression, bipolar disorder or schizophrenia – or do any immediate family members have these medical conditions?

Under some circumstances, once you’ve hired a new employee, you may be able to inquire about certain disability-related medical conditions. However, you should discuss all the specific conditions that must exist before asking these questions with your employment law attorneys to avoid violating any of the employee’s legal rights.

The TWC and EEOC help current (and prospective) employees with discrimination concerns

When individuals believe that they’ve endured discrimination while applying for work with your company – or while employed by you, they usually contact the Texas Workforce Commission and the EEOC while deciding whether to file a formal complaint.

Should you learn that such a complaint has been filed, be sure to immediately contact our law firm so we can help you prepare a thorough response, detailing all that your company did to fully respect all employee (or job applicant) rights. We can also discuss with you various proactive steps your company can take to try and decrease the chances of having any further complaints filed against you.

The Key Stages of Buying a Home in Texas

Even if you’ve bought a home in the past, it’s always wise to hire an experienced lawyer and real estate agent to help you buy a house in Texas. Contract clauses often change and you’re likely to need special provisions added to your formal offer and purchase agreement to fully protect your interests.

After contacting your Houston real estate lawyer, you’ll need to select a qualified real estate agent. When searching for one, ask close friends for recommendations if they’ve recently bought a home in one of your target areas. You can also search for an agent by visiting the Texas Real Estate Commission website —  and Trulia.com and realtor.com.

What follows is a general overview of the key stages of finding and purchasing a home in Texas when you’ve hired qualified professionals to help you.

Determining if it’s the right time to buy – what your needs are — and what you can afford

Always take time to decide if it’s really the right moment for you to purchase a home. You must be able to afford a monthly mortgage, homeowner’s (and title) insurance and the other expenses that go with buying a home and making repairs. Once you’re sure you want to buy now and know what you can afford to pay, contact several highly recommended real estate agents (who have brokered properties in your preferred area) and interview them over the phone or in person.

After checking each candidate’s references and hiring the most knowledgeable and pleasant one, you’ll be ready to start conducting your search for the right home.

You’ll first need to discuss your preferred price range and the preferred parts of town where you would like to buy a home. Be sure to note the property features that are “must haves” or “deal breakers” for you. Of course, remaining flexible is important so you can avoid missing the chance to buy one of the best homes available.

Where will you and your agent find the listings that you’ll want to see?

In addition to visiting publicly advertised “open house” events in your target areas, you and your agent can also view many available properties online. Savvy sellers often offer online visual tours of their homes to help attract prospective buyers — who can then request showings.

You can also visit the Multiple Listing Service (MLS) online and then discuss the properties that you like most with your agent. If your agent is well established in the area, you may even become privy to some private listings before others learn about them. Websites like trulia.com and realtor.com should also provide lists of many homes still on the market.

What other initial tasks can a realtor help you handle?

After you’ve met with a mortgage broker and located several properties that meet your needs, your realtor can prepare a written offer for the seller. Prior to making an offer, be sure to ask your agent if the seller has any recent home inspection reports to share with you. If none are available and you still want to make an offer on a house, your agent can make obtaining an acceptable home inspection report one of the contingencies in the home purchase agreement that must be met before you’ll purchase the house.

You’re now ready to go over the legally required disclosures that Texas requires property owners to make to parties offering to buy a home. Repairs currently needed must be detailed – along with notes about all recently completed ones. If you haven’t already received a thorough (recent) home inspection report, you really should obtain one now — so you won’t be suddenly surprised by major plumbing or other serious home repairs in the future.

Should certain repairs be needed – and you’re still willing to buy the house – your real estate agent can negotiate these matters with the buyer on your behalf. Also, you must have a title search run on the house. You don’t want to buy property with any troubling liens, easements or other encumbrances that can greatly limit your ability to fully enjoy the use of your new home.

At this point (if not already done), you should purchase title insurance so that if any future claims are made against the property by third parties, you’ll be able to properly protect all your legal interests.

Once all these matters have been fully negotiated between your agent and the seller, you’re ready to move forward into escrow.

What basic, final tasks should be handled right before — or during — escrow?

Your lawyer will make sure that the home purchase agreement contains all the necessary clauses required to protect your interests before escrow closes. If it hasn’t already been done, you should also have the home appraised to make sure your offered purchase price is reasonable and fair.

Next, all new home inspection reports should be carefully analyzed, and all financial arrangements finalized. On closing day, you’ll go to the title agent’s office to sign all the documents and pick up the keys to your new home. As the buyer, you’re not responsible for paying your real estate agent’s fees – they are covered by the seller.

After closing day, your Houston real estate attorney can check to be sure that the title to your new home has been properly recorded in the correct local government offices – and then provide you with official copies of the newly recorded title deed for your records.

Please contact Murray Lobb so we can provide you with the clear advice you’ll need while buying your new home. Since we have the necessary experience to address any problems that may arise, we should be able to minimize any stress for you. Your lawyer will remain available to answer all your questions as you prepare to move into your new home.