General Steps to Take While Preparing to Sell Your Business

Selling your company at the proper time can provide you with greater freedom and added income as you pursue other business or personal goals. Whether you’re a sole proprietor who can move forward alone — or someone who must confer with business partners or a corporate board of directors, there are basic steps you can follow that can help streamline the process.

As you further contemplate this move, give serious thought to timing and be ready to explain why you’re making specific choices to prospective buyers; They’re sure to ask why you’re selling your company now. Also think about whether you should hire a professional business broker, especially if you don’t want to manage the sale on your own and are concerned about locating the best potential buyers.

Each of these key topics are discussed further below.

Are you prepared to tell qualified buyers why you want to sell your business now?

If sales are dropping or you’re currently losing a sizable portion of your customer base, you may want to postpone the sale for six months or a year. During that time, you may be able to rebuild the company and make it more viable.

Of course, business owners often want to sell their companies for many other reasons, including the following ones.

  • They’re eager to retire and simplify their lives – letting go of business activities.
  • They have current disputes with partners, co-owners or corporate board members, so they would just like to move on. Obviously, you’ll need to reference these issues in a very tactful yet honest manner if you have no other reasons for selling.
  • The sole owner (or another party) is facing a serious illness or impending death.
  • You want to keep working — but in a less stressful capacity. Be ready to share this in as upbeat a manner as possible – while being open and honest about the pressures of running the business.
  • You’ve developed a keen interest in a different business field and are eager to get your new venture up and running.

These are just a few of the reasons why people often choose to sell a business. Whatever you decide to tell prospective buyers – be as honest as possible since a failure to disclose current problems is unethical and could damage your reputation in the community.

If your business is losing value, be prepared to tell potential buyers (after carefully qualifying them) how they might reverse that trend. You can also explain why they may still want to simply purchase all your valuable vehicles and equipment.

Decide whether you should sell the business yourself – or hire other professionals

  • Legal advice can prove crucial. You’ll also need help drafting the various legal contracts and documents required to support a sale.
  • You’ll want to work closely with your accountant. All your business and tax records must be fully updated.
  • A business appraiser can prove very helpful. This individual can help you determine a fair asking price for your company.
  • Even a brief consultation with a business broker can benefit you. This person knows how to locate a healthy pool of potential buyers. This process can prove extra challenging if you do not want to run any public advertisements.

Be prepared to locate or create various documents while trying to complete a viable sale

You must be prepared to share all your basic financial statements and records for the past three or four years. It’s also crucial to create a comprehensive list of all your company equipment and fixed assets tied to your business accounts. (Be prepared to spend the necessary fees to repair all valuable vehicles, equipment and other goods involved with the final sale).

It’s also important to create a detailed list of your ongoing sales transactions and the names of the companies that currently provide all your company’s most critical supplies. Copies of all current contracts and leases should also be made available so qualified buyers can review them.

Be prepared to carefully decide which buyers may be the most dependable ones

Many business owners prefer to sell their companies to close family members, trustworthy employees, friends or current customers. You’ll need to choose wisely, especially since this type of sale often takes from six months to two years. 

Of course, never disclose private information about your business to potential buyers until after they’ve each agreed to sign non-disclosure agreements and qualified for financing plans that meet your requirements.  Be prepared to negotiate carefully – or ask your attorney to handle the negotiations on your behalf.

If you’re ready to sell a business – or just want to learn more about all the various legal and practical steps referenced above, please contact one of our Murray Lobb attorneys. We look forward to answering all your questions.

Small Businesses Often Make Crucial Legal Mistakes

Even highly competent employees sometimes make serious legal errors while handling human resource, management, accounting and other business tasks. Since federal, state and local laws are constantly being updated, you must regularly speak with numerous employees to be sure they’re making timely and lawful decisions.

Should the feedback you receive concern you, it’s always best to consult with your Houston business law attorney to be sure you know how to promptly correct any possible errors. Lawsuits are often filed over very basic legal mistakes.

What are some of the most common legal errors that businesses keep making?

Most mistakes are made when employers try to be flexible with their rules. While compassion can go a long way toward helping you get along better with your employees, clarity and consistency are crucial. Always exercise caution when addressing the following issues.

  1. Each employee must be properly classified. You need to look at each position separately, based on all pertinent state and federal laws. If you simply decide to treat everyone as an “exempt” employee, you might be sued if you fail to provide proper overtime pay or adequate rest periods.
  2. Lunch breaks must be provided when required by law. Some employees may be entitled to a meal break after completing a specific number of hours during a shift.
  3. Make sure you’re properly labeling workers as either employees or independent contractors. You may hear from the IRS if you make this type of mistake. Take the time to speak with your lawyer about how you should carefully interact and communicate with independent contractors. Once a worker has strong legal grounds for believing that “employee” status has been conferred, you can be sued for specific benefits.
  4. You must be sure all employees understand what constitutes “sexual harassment.” If you’re sued in this field, one of your strongest defenses will be that you promptly trained all new managers and employees to help create a healthy work atmosphere. You must also develop a secure way for employees to submit complaints before problems escalate.
  5. You cannot punish or fire an employee for simply taking a leave of absence under the Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA). To protect yourself, keep accurate records of all employee evaluations being conducted at routine intervals. If you’re particularly concerned about the behavior of someone taking FMLA leave, ask your attorney when you should sit down with that employee to discuss why you’re carefully monitoring their work performance – before letting them go.
  6. Be sure to issue final paychecks on a timely basis to all employees who are leaving. Find out if you’re required to provide this type of check even before an employee has returned all employer-provided equipment, vehicles or other materials.
  7. You must handle making loans to employees in a very careful manner. While this is often a kind gesture, you must set up a formal repayment schedule. Never simply deduct a portion of what’s owed from each future paycheck.
  8. Be sure to properly handle all employer obligations under the Americans with Disability Act (ADA). You may need to make appropriate work accommodations and should always treat such workers fairly. Most disabled workers take great pride in being highly dependable and productive workers.
  9. COBRA healthcare coverage must be offered and administered properly. Give serious thought to creating a comprehensive package of this medical insurance paperwork so that it’s immediately ready to be given to qualified employees when they leave. Timing is critical so potential coverage won’t lapse.
  10. The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) must be explained and handled appropriately. Employees have a right to privacy regarding their medical data and information – be sure you’re adequately protecting it while processing claims.
  11. Pension concerns must be addressed in a timely and proper manner. The Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA) is a complicated law that requires extreme attention to detail. Always request legal advice when uncertain how to administer it.
  12. You must carefully handle all responsibilities under the Consumer Credit Protection Act (CCPA). You may need expert help calculating all your employees’ paycheck deductions for lawful wage garnishments – including those for child support and student loans. Look for highly respected software that may help your most experienced workers.
  13. Equal Pay Act. This law must be carefully followed since too many businesses keep failing to pay men and women fairly when handling similar work.
  14. Title VII concerns. Your company must avoid discriminatory practices when hiring, laying off and firing employees. Many businesses are learning to use multiple interviewers with highly diverse backgrounds so that fairness can be readily achieved.
  15. OSHA laws. You must make sure to keep adequate records covering all workplace accidents and injuries for an appropriate number of years — if you employ ten or more workers.

Should you have any questions about these topics, please contact your Murray Lobb lawyer to discuss your concerns. We have extensive experience providing legal advice to our clients so they can can readily comply with all federal, state and local laws.

The Basic Steps for Forming a Texas Corporation

Although running a business can be very challenging, it’s often invigorating to reach a point when you may need to incorporate your company. This process is often begun by discussing what can be gained or loss by making this move with your business partners. You should also consider speaking with your Houston business lawyer so you’ll fully understand all the legal implications of making this decision.

The following material reviews the main reasons that many companies choose to incorporate their businesses. It then notes the most common steps that must be taken prior to filing a certificate of incorporation with the Texas Secretary of State’s Office.

Potential advantages that are often acquired by incorporating a business

  • Improved legal liability status. Creating a corporation can provide each individual business partner with added protection against personal liability for the actions of all other executives or employees. It can also offer greater protection for business assets;
  • Critical, everyday activities can be simplified. Upon incorporating, it can become easier to add new owners and investors while still maintaining the same level of control over your company;
  • The company can more easily transact business all around the world. It’s often easier to conduct business in a corporate form in many other countries;
  • It can help you one day take your company public. While your corporate executives and employees may always want to conduct business privately, a time may come when it may be to your financial advantage to take the company public and sell stock.

Those are just a few of the main reasons why many business executives decide to incorporate their current companies or partnerships.

Common steps you must take when you’re ready to incorporate your business

  1. Name the corporation. Try to choose a name that suits your business and helps raise your profile. You and your lawyer will need to conduct a formal search to see if any of the names you’d like to choose are currently available in Texas;
  2. Select a registered agent and office. Be prepared to designate a trustworthy party to serve as your registered agent and name the city where that person will keep his or her office;
  3. Choose which parties will be named as the corporation’s organizers or incorporators. The names and addresses of each of these individuals must be listed within the certificate of formation;
  4. Designate your corporate directors. After the certificate of formation has been filed, the directors take over running your business. These highly knowledgeable executives must also have strong management and interpersonal skills that will help them successfully negotiate all future decisions and transactions;
  5. Draft a brief statement, indicating the corporation’s official business purpose. While this may sound rather straightforward, it’s often wise to run this description by your lawyer to be sure you’ve fully covered all key aspects of your intended business transactions;
  6. Consider obtaining professional help with the completion of your official certificate of incorporation. Like other states, Texas has specific expectations for the precise information that must be included. Since these requirements can change periodically, it’s often wise to ask your lawyer to review the contents of your certificate of incorporation;
  7. Pay the required fees. These should normally be posted on the Texas Secretary of State’s online website. If you prefer, your lawyer can submit your fees and certificate of incorporation for you.

While this list of common steps isn’t intended to be fully comprehensive, it should clearly indicate the basic steps that you and your business partners should take if you decide that it’s time to incorporate your business.

Please feel free to contact the lawyers at Murray Lobb so we can answer any specific questions you may have about this process. We’ve helped many clients incorporate their businesses over the years – and we’re ready to put that experience to work for you.

Six Basic Types of Business Insurance You Might Need

Successful companies of all sizes readily address their insurance needs so they won’t later be caught off guard by either a baseless or valid legal claim. No matter how hard you try to provide flawless products and services to the public, there’s always a chance that a defective product or business transaction may render you liable for legal damages.

Although only certain types of companies must carry workers compensation, disability and unemployment insurance to meet federal guidelines, all businesses can benefit from protecting their company assets by purchasing basic and special types of business insurance.

Fortunately, there are only six basic types of business insurance that you and your business partners must carefully review while trying to protect your company against future legal challenges. All six are set forth below with additional information.

Six common types of business insurance

Before reviewing the following types of insurance, be sure to thoroughly discuss the precise nature of all your business transactions with your insurance agent.

  1. General liability insurance. This will provide you with legal defense support for a variety of alleged wrongs. For example, your company may be sued based on a personal injury claim or the alleged statements of one of your employees. For example, if one of your customers is seriously injured while visiting one of your offices or factories, this policy can help you compensate the injured party for all bodily injuries and medical expenses. In addition, this same type of policy could protect you if a court holds one of your employees liable for business libel or slander — for damages up to the maximum amount of coverage stated in your policy.
  2. Product liability insurance. Even some of the most reliable products on the market will occasionally malfunction and harm a consumer. For this reason, you must secure an ample amount of product liability insurance coverage for this type of claim.
  3. Professional liability insurance. If your company provides any types of services to customers, you must carry this type of policy – often referred to as “E and O” (errors and omissions) coverage. This policy will cover the costs of defending your company in a civil lawsuit that may be based on the alleged grounds of malpractice (often medical or legal). The insurance industry doesn’t view these types of claims as eligible for coverage under either general liability insurance or a homeowner’s insurance policy.
  4. Commercial property insurance. Industrial fires, floods, windy hail storms and other natural disasters can quickly destroy critical manufacturing plants, office buildings and valuable inventory. Always be sure to carry ample coverage under this type of policy — based on recent property value appraisals.
  5. Home-based business insurance. This type of policy is usually offered as a rider to a person’s homeowner’s insurance. It provides limited coverage for such problems as business equipment and inventory damages. This type of policy can also provide funds to cover liability claims brought by injured third parties.
  6. A business owner’s policy. This general type of coverage can let you bundle nearly all (or most) of your insurance needs into one policy. If you pursue this option alone – make sure it adequately protects you regarding all the most unique aspects of your company’s goods and services.

When discussing your insurance needs with your lawyer and insurance agent

Always talk about every reasonable type of harm that your business might suffer. Also, make sure you’ve chosen the best type of partnership or corporate structure to further protect your personal and business assets. Once you fully understand all the risks your company might face, find a highly respected business insurance broker. Always ask trusted business peers for their recommendations for this type of agent.

Finally, speak with your Houston business law attorney about all the specific types of insurance required by the state of Texas for a company like yours. And be sure to address all the federal government’s insurance requirements. Keep in touch with your insurance agent and lawyer throughout each year so they can each readily update you about new legal or policy requirements that may affect your current coverage during the upcoming year.

Please feel free to contact a Murray Lobb lawyer so we can talk with you about the legal aspects of obtaining adequate insurance coverage for all your business needs.