Why Most Adults Under Age 35 Needs an Estate Plan

Many young adults assume they won’t need a simple or comprehensive estate plan until they’ve created or inherited a sizeable amount of wealth. However, all adults, especially those who are married or have children, need estate plans to protect their legal interests.

After all, none of us know when we may suddenly become the victim of a severe pedestrian or auto accident – or receive a devastating medical diagnosis. When you have a basic Will, it can greatly simplify matters for your loved ones if you become too incapacitated to manage your own finances or even pass away.

The following information helps explain why no one should want to continue being one of the approximately 60% of American adults who are without a Will or estate plan.

While it may be a bit uncomfortable requesting documents that directly address your own possible incapacitation or death – the peace of mind you and your loved ones will gain always makes the effort worth it.

Key reasons why all younger adults can benefit from a Will or comprehensive estate plan

  • They each allow you to specifically name the beneficiaries you want to receive your real property and investment accounts. When you fail to create a Will, the state of Texas will apply its laws of intestacy to decide who will inherit everything you own. Even if you’ve only had time to pay into a 401k or other investment account for a few years, chances are you also own a car and a few other valuable possessions. Creating an estate plan lets you decide who will receive your assets – although community property and other laws will also come into play if you’re married;
  • You can designate a guardian for any minor children. There may be good reasons why your child shouldn’t go live with certain relatives if you become critically ill (or too disabled) to care for the child. A Will lets you designate one or more people to shoulder this responsibility, along with one or two back-up guardians.
  • You can designate someone else to speak for you in a medical Advanced Directive. This type of estate planning document lets a person you trust choose the specific medical care you wish to receive if you become seriously ill and can’t make decisions for yourself;
  • Your Houston estate planning attorney can provide you with valuable legal advice on how to protect your wealth against excessive taxes as your estate begins to grow. Even if you hold a degree in asset or wealth management, you’ll always need to make sure you’re using tax-efficient wealth transfers to others that fully comply with all recent changes in IRS laws and regulations. You may also want to have a trust account created to help you annually transfer wealth to specific individuals or charitable organizations;
  • Creating an estate plan helps you develop meaningful savings goals as you begin to plan for your eventual retirement. If you begin funding your retirement in your early 20s and 30s, you’ll increase the chances of being able to choose the date when you’ll retire or reduce your workload. Should you marry, having an estate plan can help you and your spouse make more informed choices about assuming a new mortgage, having children, setting aside funds to help pay for your children’s education — and possibly even one day funding a charitable trust or family foundation.

Perhaps the best part of creating an estate plan when you’re very young is that you’ll be able to reflect on how your legal documents are helping you “grow your income.” And you’ll always be able to change and update your financial goals when new life circumstances develop.

While many younger people request an entire set of estate planning documents, others are more comfortable just requesting a Will that will cover all their current, limited possessions.

Please feel free to contact one of our Murray Lobb attorneys so we can provide you with the estate planning advice you currently need. We’ll always be available to answer any questions you have and update your legal paperwork as your life changes and moves forward.

Obtaining an SBA Loan for Your Company

Although the SBA (Small Business Administration) doesn’t directly lend money to owners of small companies, it does create loan guidelines for general lenders, community development organizations and micro-lending institutions that partner with it. The SBA helps reduce the risks for these lenders as they select the most qualified small businesses seeking help.

SBA-guaranteed loans are designed to offer competitive fees and rates and applicants are usually offered helpful counseling during the application process.

You’ll know when you’ve found the best loan offer since it will provide you with one or more of the following benefits.

  • The need for little or no collateral
  • Flexible overhead requirements
  • Lower down payments

Although the stated reasons for securing a loan can vary, many companies seek loans to help them secure long-term fixed assets and basic funds to run their businesses. However, under certain circumstances, the amount you can borrow may be restricted based on how your company intends to use the money.

SBA loan funds are often sought for the following types of working capital and fixed assets

  • Revolving credit
  • Seasonal financing
  • Export loans
  • The refinancing of current business debt
  • Machinery
  • Real estate
  • Construction
  • Equipment
  • Remodeling

What types of eligibility requirements must be met to obtain a loan?

Lenders often first inquire about the parties holding ownership interests in the company, how it generates income and where it conducts business. They also inquire about the basic size of your business – based on the company’s number of employees, average annual receipts and other factors.

Of course, your ability to repay the loan is of keen interest to lenders, along with having a very secure business purpose. While a strong credit rating is highly desirable for obtaining loans, if you’re running a new company, certain start-up funds may still be made available to you.

Keep in mind that all lenders are entitled to establish their own, supplemental eligibility requirements for making an SBA-guaranteed loan – and they’re also entitled to ask about the following information.

  • If your company is properly registered and currently eligible to do business;
  • Whether your business is currently operating in the United States or one or more of its territories;
  • If you can easily document the time and money each business partner has already invested in the company;
  • If you can provide evidence of any recent, unsuccessful efforts to secure a non-SBA loan.

Can small companies operating as exporters of goods obtain loans from the SBA?

The SBA does try to help such companies. However, you’ll need to usually start your search for a possible lender by first contacting an SBA International Trade Specialist or the group’s Office of International Trade. Exporters often need help securing additional funds to cover their daily operating expenses, placing advance orders with suppliers and debt refinancing.

How should my company go about looking for a specific SBA-affiliated lender?

You’ll first need to spend five to ten minutes answering questions on the SBA website concerning your company’s present needs. You should then receive an email matching you to one or more interested lenders. It is then up to you to contact each potential lender to discuss possible rates, fees and other factors involved with structuring a loan. You’ll then need to submit applications and wait to receive responses.

If you do not receive any offers that you believe are favorable or viable, you can ask to speak to an SBA counselor again to see if there’s a better way for your company to try and secure the type of loan you need.

Please feel free to contact one of our Murray Lobb attorneys so we can provide you with further advice about obtaining business loans through SBA programs, private banks — or other reputable sources.

Brief Overview of Texas and Federal Whistleblower Laws

All employers must respectfully interact with employees who report alleged wrongdoings in the workplace. Often referred to as “whistleblowers,” these individuals are trying to correct illegal practices or behaviors they believe are harmful to many. Although some whistleblowers may have improper motives, you always ignore them at your own peril – especially since there are Texas and federal laws designed to protect them under certain circumstances.

The following information about whistleblower laws and related activities can help you better understand why an employer must obtain timely legal advice from a Houston business law attorney once any employee threatens to file this type of complaint.

The Texas Whistleblower Act

This statute is found in Sections 554.001 (and following) of the Texas Government Code. It only provides protection against employer retaliation for public employees – not private ones. The law expressly forbids public employers from suspending, terminating or otherwise imposing adverse personnel actions employees who report alleged legal violations by the employer or co-workers.

However, the complaining party – who must report the alleged wrongdoings to the appropriate law enforcement authority – must undergo (exhaust) all employer grievance or appeals processes before being allowed to sue the employer. Under the Texas statute, all whistleblower lawsuits must be filed within 90 days of the reported wrongdoing.

Damages may include obtaining a legal injunction against the employer – as well as receipt of all back pay owed if the employee was terminated (or demoted) in a retaliatory move. Successful whistleblowers (who meet all statutory requirements), are also entitled to receive full reinstatement, all fringe benefits owed, full seniority rights, actual damages, reasonable attorney fees, court costs and a set maximum of possible other compensatory damages.

Furthermore, a supervisor found to have violated the complaining employee’s rights under this Texas statute (Section 554.008) can be forced to pay up to a $15,000 civil fine.

While the burden of proof is on the whistleblower, the possible penalties can be formidable.

Federal laws often relied upon by various whistleblowers

  • The Sarbanes-Oxley Act (passed shortly after all the illegal Enron activities). It mainly addresses the penalties available in the wake of fraudulent accounting practices.
  • The Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act.
  • OSHA violations. Many construction workers and other employees file “whistleblower” complaints based on these Occupational Safety and Health Administration statutes and regulations.
  • Various Department of Energy laws and statutes.
  • Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) laws and regulations.
  • Federal airline regulations.
  • The False Claims Act (as recently updated).
  • The Fraud Enforcement and Recovery Act of 2009.
  • Hazardous waste regulations.
  • The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act — and other government statutes related to the provision and receipt of proper medical care.

While this list isn’t intended to be comprehensive, it provides a general overview of the types of statutes and regulations often referenced in many whistleblower complaints.

The following information reviews the most common types of illegal retaliation some employers take upon learning that a whistleblower complaint has been filed.

Forbidden, retaliatory actions taken by some employers

  • Job termination. Far too many employers look for “clever” ways to fire complaining employees once they learn a whistleblower complaint may be filed.
  • Demotion. An aggrieved employee may be called in and told that there have been long-standing complaints about his/her performance – requiring demotion to a lower position with considerably lower pay.
  • Thinly disguised harassment on the job.
  • Retaliatory discipline. This may include the placement of highly negative performance reviews in an employee’s file – making it much harder for the workers to receive any future promotions or favorable recommendations upon leaving the job.
  • Blacklisting. Some employers will “discreetly” contact their peers throughout the same industry, purposefully designating the specific, complaining employee in hopes of preventing that person from every landing another job in that same field.

Two high-profile whistleblower events help explain how such actions often unfold

One of the best ways to gain a stronger understanding of whistleblower activities is to read all you can about how former Enron employee Sherron Watkins reported her concerns about her employer. You may also want to learn more about all the late FBI agent W. Mark Felt (“Deep Throat”) did to expose President Richard Nixon’s illegal activities tied to the Watergate scandal.

As one Texas Monthly article puts it, the Enron scandal involved highly questionable financial practices that included the creation of financial entities to help Enron conceal the company’s growing debt from Wall Street, regulators and the general public. The book Power Failure provides an in-depth look at how all of Enron’s troubles began and how its illegal activities ruined the lives of so many.

Conclusion

Always make sure your company (or government office) provides all supervisory personnel with comprehensive training on the proper ways to respond once a whistleblower complaint has been filed (or is referenced by an employee). And remember that retaliatory acts must be avoided since they’re illegal and often very costly.

If you believe an employee is preparing to file a “whistleblower” complaint against you, please contact one of our Murray Lobb attorneys right away. We can explain your legal rights to you and help you take the proper steps to respond appropriately. Timely intervention can prevent critical misunderstandings and unnecessary litigation.

Many People Start New Businesses After Age 50

A large percentage of Americans launch new companies and careers after turning fifty. In fact, the term “encore entrepreneurs” has been coined to describe this steady trend. In her book, “Your Life Calling: Reimagining the Rest of Your Life,” Jane Pauley profiles some rather amazing people who’ve transformed their “retirement years.” Many of them are now realizing personal dreams that are helping others both locally and in distant parts of the world.

In a recent New York Times article addressing this topic, one man in his early sixties said that he’s so happy with his new company (which creates educational and training videos) that he may never retire. Fortunately, many larger cities often have “incubators” designed to help people get new companies off the ground — and venture capitalists who are eager to consider funding start-ups with a strong likelihood of success.

Texas remains a great state for new businesses

Every year, many media outlets rank multiple Texas cities as great places to design and build new companies. Be sure to review our Texas governor’s office publication entitled “Texas Business Incubators.”

Once you’ve got a great idea for starting a business, consider scheduling an appointment with your experienced Houston business law attorney to obtain the valuable legal advice you’ll need.

Here are some additional facts and figures that can provide useful insights into some of the best fields to enter (and others to avoid) as you move forward with getting your new company up and running.

Facts and statistics about older Americans starting new companies & becoming self-employed

  • Fifty-one percent (51%) of new start-up business owners are between the ages of 50 and 88. In fact, those aged 35-49 only start about 33% of new companies — and those age 35 or younger only form about 16% of them. Fortunately, you don’t often need a lot of money to get a new company off the ground. Many older entrepreneurs start their companies with $2,000 or less.
  • The Dallas Morning News reports that during each month in 2017, roughly 400 out of every 100,000 Texans became entrepreneurs. A large percentage of those individuals were seniors. Many of their businesses were formed in Austin, Dallas and Houston.
  • About 80% of new Texas business entrepreneurs start their businesses based upon immediately available opportunities – rather than the simple need to find work.
  • Between the year 2000 and 2016, the number of self-employed New Yorkers rose by 63.7 percent. While the country’s economic downturn back around 2008 certainly influenced that trend, it clearly isn’t the sole or main force behind it.
  • About 69% of Americans start their businesses at home.
  • Roughly 42% of all new businesses are formed as S-corporations and 23% are LLCs. Of course, a very large number of small businesses are simply run by solo entrepreneurs.

Which types of new businesses tend to succeed the most often?

  • Those offering insurance, real estate or financial services. After four years, about 58% of these are usually still viable.  Businesses in the financial realm often offer tax preparation, bookkeeping or payroll services.
  • Companies renting or leasing automotive equipment.
  • Legal service businesses.
  • Medical, dental and other healthcare services.
  • Religious organizations.
  • Specific types of administrative or company management services.

Types of new businesses that frequently fail sooner than others

  • Stores selling beer, wine and liquor
  • Auto dealerships
  • Oil and gas extraction service companies
  • Grocery stores
  • Beverage manufacturers
  • Furniture stores
  • Companies selling lawn and garden equipment

After going over your business plans with trusted family members or friends, consider reading more about the different types of business structures you can choose from and what’s normally involved with starting a new Texas company.

Hopefully, you’ll decide to join the many other Texans who’ve discovered that running a business when you’re older can be a very gratifying experience – one that can add even greater purpose to your life.

Our law firm invites adults of every age to contact one of our Murray Lobb attorneys for legal advice when either starting a new business – or simply needed help with one that’s already thriving.

Why It’s Often Wise to Moniter Employee Computer Usage

While all employees benefit from believing that their companies trust them, they must still accept the modern workplace reality that certain privacy interests must be carefully weighed against protecting valid business interests. Furthermore, employers have a need and a duty to make sure that all employees are putting in their fair share of time while completing assignments. No one should be allowed to waste valuable work time surfing the Internet or responding to personal emails while others are shouldering their proper tasks.

Do many employers regularly monitor computer and Internet usage?

At present, about 80% of large companies carefully monitor how their employees use workplace computers. They also routinely review all company website and social media postings and randomly review email exchanges and software downloads. Internet usage is also closely monitored. These practices can often help businesses avoid future lawsuits and financial losses.

Once your company decides to begin monitoring practices, you really should talk with your Houston business law attorney about all the legal concerns that can develop.

Before addressing other key issues involved with monitoring your employees, it will be helpful to note how many companies provide notice to their workers that their computer usage and Internet activities will soon be regularly reviewed.

When and how do employers bring up computer and Internet monitoring to employees?

  • At the time of hiring. You can make this a condition of accepting employment;
  • When all periodic performance evaluations are conducted. At the end of these sessions, you can produce a carefully worded document, asking for the employee’s written consent for monitoring their computer usage and business communications. It may be helpful to note how this can help protect some of their own interests — and limit the harassment that some employees might otherwise engage in if no such monitoring existed;
  • Include several paragraphs on the topic in your employee handbook. Always be sure that you later ask each new employee if they have any questions about this policy;
  • Place a warning above the company’s computer network sign-in page. This warning might reference the employee handbook – or the written consent form you should have already obtained from each employee;
  • Include a very clear and obvious “Notice” paragraph at the bottom of each outgoing email. This is an attempt to provide notice to third parties (such as non-business contacts who may include workers’ friends and family members who write to them at work – that any or all such emails are subject to monitoring and review).

Your signed consent forms should remind employees (along with the company employee handbook) that certain types of improper communications and usage of the Internet can result in disciplinary actions – and even firing.

As the following information indicates, your careful review of how employees are using their computers can prevent many serious workplace conflicts.

Harmful activities pursued by some using company computers, email and the Internet

  • Harassing behaviors. Making illegal and damaging statements in emails may constitute sexual, racial – or other forms of harassment;
  • Likewise, some types of email (or typed letters) may contain defamatory comments or illegal threats against others. No employee has the right to make serious threats against other employees or outside email recipients. These negative communications may simply imply that a specific person may lose his or her job if certain improper demands aren’t met;
  • Critical company information (like trade secrets and intellectual property) may be stolen and then shared with others;
  • Employees may download and then share copyrighted material or software, allowing others to make additional copies. This can also include the illegal download of porn materials — that are then sent off to others – or stored on your business databases;
  • Workers may accidentally share harmful email and general computer viruses while using their computers in unauthorized ways;
  • Employees may spend lengthy time periods surfing the net — unrelated to legitimate work assignments. Many companies wind up paying significant amounts of money each year for time that employees spent playing online games or enjoying other unauthorized Internet activities;
  • Some workers may maliciously sabotage company files and data for no apparent purpose;
  • Other employees may use their work computers and printers to complete tasks for their separate, private business needs.

Do employers have broad rights to monitor all employee activities at work?

Federal, state and even global laws can limit these rights. Also, most employers do not have the right to invade employee privacy by placing intrusive cameras or audio devices in restrooms or lunchrooms. However, they do have some specific rights to monitor how employees use equipment provided to them. And under certain circumstances, companies can even monitor how employees use their own personal computers while logged on to company networks and databases.

In general, any efforts you make to monitor employee communications must agree with the provisions of the federal Electronic Communications Privacy Act (ECPA). Fortunately, it does allow certain types of monitoring that fall within an acceptable “business purpose exception.” In other words, your monitoring efforts must have a direct tie to protecting a “legitimate business purpose.”

As already noted above, it’s crucial to discuss all these matters with your attorney to be sure your approach to computer monitoring will not subject your company to any employee or third-party privacy lawsuits.

What global, federal and Texas laws address all these various legal topics?

Keep in mind that companies regularly interacting with international clients or companies must be prepared to observe all the following types of governing laws.

  • The European Union General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) – and the laws passed by many of its members’ individual states;
  • The Electronic Communications Privacy Act (ECPA)
  • The Stored Communications Act
  • Various federal wiretapping laws
  • Texas statutes and case law that your lawyer can review with you

Some general guidance is also available on the Texas Workforce Commission website.

Conclusion

Companies of every size must give all these issues considerable thought before buying any types of computer monitoring software. You’ll also need to decide which DLP (data loss prevention) solutions or strategies are most likely to meet your company’s unique needs. For example, do you want to prioritize software that helps with network traffic monitoring, keystroke logging, natural language processing – or other methods? You’ll also need to consider what types of data encryption practices may be useful to you.

Fortunately, there are many outside consultants who can help you carefully evaluate all the current computer monitoring software that’s available – so you can find the best products that fall within an affordable price range for your company.

Please feel free to contact one of our Murray Lobb attorneys so we can address your current questions about monitoring your employees’ business communications and usage of the Internet. We can also help you draft the types of privacy consent forms and other paperwork that can help you more proactively safeguard your company’s business interests.