Key Ways to Protect Your Business Against Cybersecurity Threats

After the massive data breach involving Marriott’s Starwood hotel brands was reported in 2018, businesses of all sizes began wondering again if anyone can remain safe against hackers. About 500 million guests who stayed at Starwood properties (including Westin, Sheraton, W Hotels, and the St. Regis) had their names, phone numbers, email addresses, birth dates, encrypted credit card data and other information stolen.

What’s shocked people even more is that this breach covered a four-year time period extending from 2014 through September 2018. It’s hard to believe that any company’s computer networks could be so severely compromised over such a long period of time before being discovered.

Companies of all sizes who haven’t already done so must immediately take proactive steps to reduce their chances of having their customer data and other proprietary information suddenly stolen or compromised.

What one past study revealed about cybersecurity threats – that keep increasing annually

  • Close to half of the businesses surveyed consider themselves “very dependent” on the Internet for their daily business operations;
  • Over one-third of those interviewed said that it would be very damaging for their companies to be without Internet access for 48 hours in a row;
  • Small business employees rely on using the Internet for 75% to 100% of their daily work.

A much more recent study revealed that 58% of the victims of malware (cybersecurity) attacks are small businesses. Furthermore, cyber attacks wound up costing most targeted small companies about $2,235,000. Clearly, no one should avoid addressing this crucial issue.

Fortunately, various cybersecurity experts and business professionals are sharing their ideas about some of the best ways to prevent new attacks – as opposed to just responding to them.

You must determine your current level of risk to an attack before creating a protection plan

Even if you already have a highly qualified IT professional on your payroll, it’s often best to hire an outside cybersecurity consultant to come in and objectively assess your various levels of risk to a hacking attack. A “white-hat hacker” (someone on your side) can attempt to evaluate your code vulnerabilities and network and system weaknesses.

This expert can also evaluate how appropriately your employees are responding to suspicious emails that could easily introduce malware into your computer networks and databases. Give serious thought to having this type of outside expert audit your risk level at least once every two years – if not annually.

Keep in mind that it’s often useful to assign a risk level of low, medium or high to each system that might be compromised by a data breach. This can help you as you design a cybersecurity protection plan that prioritizes various risks.

Regularly review the FINRA cybersecurity checklist if you’re a smaller firm or business

This source is designed to help companies handle the following tasks.

  • Identify and evaluate all current cybersecurity threats to better protect all business assets against outside intrusions (or in-house security lapses);
  • Readily determine when your company software or databases have been hacked or compromised;
  • Decide (in advance) how to quickly counter attacks or threats as soon as they’re detected. It’s always wise to create several options based on the type of information or software that may be under attack;
  • Develop a plan with any in-house IT professionals and your outside cybersecurity consultant for readily recovering any company assets that are lost, stolen or otherwise compromised.

Create an employee training program that will help protect your systems and networks

Your employees must take the ongoing threat of a cyberattack very seriously. Staff members who fail to follow all in-house cybersecurity protocol often make it easier for outside hackers to gain entry. You might consider requiring a two-factor authentication password for those seeking to gain access to some of your company’s most valuable or vulnerable accounts.

Before providing this training, you must decide which parts of your computer network, systems and databases should remain off limits to various levels of employees.

It’s also important to let your employees know if you’ll be regularly monitoring their usage of all company computers. (It’s best to obtain written permission for this practice at the time you initially hire all employees). Inform everyone that each employee’s access to information will probably be restricted — based on their normal daily need to access certain information or to complete their assigned tasks.

Give very serious thought to limiting the outside Internet websites that employees can visit while at work and indicate what types of data downloads from outside sources are forbidden. Including these restrictions in your company’s formal training and cybersecurity protocol can help decrease the chances of anyone downloading threatening malware or viruses.

Always ask everyone to encrypt their attempts to access various company databases and accounts. You should also encrypt access to all email accounts. Finally, be sure all employees know the safest ways to file and store data, so it can be fully protected from hackers, while remaining easy to access again when needed.

Develop a comprehensive plan for offboarding employees (those leaving your company)

Regardless of whether someone is being fired or has accepted a new job elsewhere, you need to have a systematic way of reclaiming company property when workers leave. You must also revoke their access to all business networks. Be sure all exiting employees return all company laptops, ID badges, company credit cards, mobile devices and other equipment.

Finally, delete the email addresses of exiting employees as soon as they leave. Someone should also change the company passwords they regularly used that were not encrypted. And always try to make sure every employee has signed an appropriate NDAs (non-disclosure agreements).

Although not intended to be comprehensive, we hope this list of suggestions will help your company gain greater protection against future cybersecurity attacks.

Please feel free to contact one of our Murray Lobb attorneys about how various Texas and federal cybersecurity laws and regulations may impact your company. We can also provide you with a non-disclosure agreement for exiting employees to sign and review the terms and legal limitations of any cybersecurity insurance policy that you may be looking at in hopes of limiting your business liability for future data breaches.

How Texas Estates Are Often Handled When Wills Cannot Be Found

Given how hard most people work to pay their bills and save up for their retirement years, you would think all of us would want to maintain strict control over who will inherit from us. Yet statistics reveal that only about forty percent (40%) of Americans have faced their mortality and asked their lawyers to help them create Wills.

When we make this error, we increase the chances that relatives we don’t know very well – or perhaps even like – may one day receive all our wealth. That’s regrettable since most of us have specific family members who would benefit the most from an inheritance. And great charities and faith-related beneficiaries can always use our funds to bless many others.

Hopefully, this article will help you see the advantages of meeting with your Houston estate planning attorney to create a first Will — and then later update it as your estate grows.

What are the five ways Texas wealth is often distributed when there is no Will?

  1. Under the state’s intestate succession laws. While these are useful, they do not let you determine who will inherit from you. Furthermore, if you own any of the following types of accounts or property, you must make sure that you’ve provided an updated list of beneficiaries to those who maintain these accounts (or other forms of wealth) on your behalf.
  1. Proceeds from a life insurance policy
  2. Retirement account funds that may include a 401k, IRA — or another, similar type of account
  3. Property that you and another person own together
  4. POD or payable-on-death account funds
  5. Property that’s already held in some type of living trust
  1. Through the filing of an Affidavit of Heirship. This approach can normally only be used when the assets requiring a title transfer are real estate. However, you can sometimes use this type of affidavit for non-property assets – depending on the rules of the institution that currently manages those items. Be prepared to discuss this topic in detail with your lawyer since there are certain limitations involved with using this type of affidavit.

For example, some title companies will not accept these types of affidavits when you’re trying to establish a legally valid chain of title for property. In addition, since no personal representative will be appointed, there won’t be anyone who can manage the estate’s assets and pay all required debts. Also, two witnesses must sign this type of affidavit and both are liable for any false statements that may be contained in it.

  1. By filing a Small Estate Affidavit. If your attorney takes this approach, he’ll first have to determine if the estate is solvent and if it’s worth $75,000 or less. In addition, the affidavit can only be used to transfer title to a homestead. Furthermore, there will be no appointed personal representative to collect all the assets, pay all required debts and deal with necessary third parties. Financially responsible witnesses must also sign this type of affidavit.
  1. Using a probate court proceeding called a determination of heirship. The advantages of this approach include having a hearing, the presentation of evidence and a court issuing a judgment accepting or rejecting all submitted affidavits of heirship. However, some relatives eager to settle an estate may find this approach less appealing since it can be rather costly – mainly due to the need to file various pleadings with the probate court. You must also coordinate everything with the court appointed attorney ad litem who will investigate whether there’s any possible fraud regarding the filed affidavits of heirship. However, obtaining a court ruling that specific parties are lawful heirs is very useful;
  1. Handling the matter as either an independent or dependent administration of the estate.

The difference between these two types of administrations is based on the degree to which the probate court must be involved in the proceedings. The term “independent administration” simply means that the court has minimal involvement.

Whichever approach is chosen, there will need to be an appointment of a personal representative who is qualified to receive letters of administration provided by the probate court. These “letters” allow the personal representative to collect all the assets and pay all the debts. The biggest drawback of this approach is that it’s often the most expensive way to handle the estate of someone who died without a Will.

Hopefully, this general information has helped you see that creating a Will is one of the best ways to move forward into a more stable financial future.

Please feel free to contact one of our Murray Lobb lawyers so we can answer any questions you may have about settling someone else’s estate — or drawing up a Will (or full estate plan) of your own. We appreciate the opportunity to help our clients handle these types of matters and look forward to hearing from you soon.

What Should Be Included in Your Employee Handbook?

Both large and small companies can benefit from providing their workers with employee handbooks. These texts help employers answer key questions and clearly document that the same standards and rules govern their interactions with everyone. After all, no one wants to work for an employer who grants special privileges or benefits to some workers and not to others.

Employee handbooks also let employers set forth all their behavioral standards and procedural rules in a manner that can help them limit future liabilities — should anyone ever try to sue them for wrongful termination or acting in a discriminatory manner.

Before reviewing some crucial sections that many businesses like to include in their employee manuals, here’s a quick look at some of the topics that most workers want to see addressed.

Employees often search for information about key standards and office procedures

  • Be sure to outline your behavioral standards, attendance rules, office attire and the level of respect required for all relationships. Most employees are eager to learn how you view tardiness and what you consider acceptable clothing. Likewise, new workers want to learn about your conduct standards — and if your office has a “zero tolerance” policy toward all forms of sexual harassment and discrimination;
  • Always provide clear information about pay grades, qualifications for receiving medical insurance, pay periods and all forms of employee benefits. Workers usually start to relax more once they’re told how often they’ll be paid and the exact size of their payroll deductions. Likewise, it’s important to tell employees when (and if) they may be considered qualified for healthcare insurance;
  • Always state how often employee evaluations are conducted and the best ways workers can try to position themselves for future raises and promotions;
  • Be sure to note any individual or family leave policy provisions that your company honors. Always have your Houston employment law attorney read over this information for you, to be sure it fully complies with all current federal, state and local laws; and
  • Describe your most crucial emergency and safety procedures. Always tell your workers how they should evacuate from the office during extreme weather events, fires and even possible shooting incidents. Each new worker should be shown the proper way to exit the building on their first day on the job – and be shown where fire extinguishers and first aid kits are kept.

While these are just a small sampling of the general topics most employees want to see covered, they should help remind you of many other important subjects that you should cover in your employee handbooks.

The following list is compromised of some of the most commonly used sections in employee handbooks.

Key headings or sections most employers include in their employee handbooks

  • A “Preface” section. You may want to provide a general history of the company here, along with information about the founding members of the business. You can also note who currently heads up various office branches. The company’s key values and goals for the future are also often stated here. If you like, you can also add a brief congratulations to each new employee for being hired;
  • Material explaining all basic pay arrangements, promotions and current employee benefits. You can describe any 401k or stock options in this section, as well as the various types of retirement benefits. Overtime pay policies should also be covered;
  • A section that describes “at-will” employment versus jobs offered under contract;
  • Standards for employee behavior. Be sure to address the need for regular attendance; rules governing personal cell phone use during the work day – and any restrictions on using work computers for private purposes. (Ask your attorney if you need to obtain written permission from all employees to monitor their computer usage);
  • Formal leave policies. In this section, you’ll need to list all paid office holidays, how employees should handle vacation and sick leave, personal days off, family medical leave and time off to honor current military service commitments;
  • Employee termination policies. Be sure to note that these can vary, depending on; if an employee is considered an “at-will” worker who can be dismissed rather informally or if the person was hired under a formal contract.
  • Confidentiality policies. Be sure to clearly state what information and trade secrets the company considers confidential and trade secret. Ideally, all employees would signed a confidentiality and non-disclosure agreement.

Should you wish to review a large number of sections that different employers have included in their employee handbooks, consider reading 53 Key Sections of an Employee Handbook (and Other Helpful Tips).”

The Texas Workforce Commission also has a number of policies and a form of Employee Handbook available for free at https://twc.texas.gov/news/efte/table_of_contents-az.html. However, choosing the right sections for any employee handbook often requires a keen understanding of employment law and many complex human resources issues.

Please feel free to contact one of our Murray Lobb attorneys for help in drafting your new or updated employee handbook. We can provide you with the proper legal terminology required to meet your company’s unique needs.

Why You Need to Create a Business Succession Plan NOW

Why You Need to Create a Business Succession Plan Now

Even when all owners of a company plan to work until the very end of their lives, there’s still a need for a viable business succession plan. After all, anyone can become totally or partially disabled as a result of a serious car accident or die of a deadly disease on almost any day.

When business owners hide from this reality, they often create havoc for all surviving partners or family members. Instead, it’s better to move forward at a calmer time to carefully address these types of possible future events.

Your Houston business law and estate planning attorney can help you decide on the best way to either pass your business on to others — or liquidate all the assets to meet your own needs and those of your survivors.

General questions you must answer yourself about any succession plan

  • What is the current market value of this business and all its assets?
  • Who is the best possible buyer? Do I prefer to sell the business to a co-owner, family member, employee or a third party?
  • Am I more likely to sell the business sooner rather than later? Am I interested in selling the company now due to health, retirement or other reasons?
  • Is this business tied to its current location? If not, would it be reasonably simple for the business to be moved elsewhere and successfully run by someone there?
  • What preferences do I have about how the sale should be financed? Am I willing to personally finance the loan? If so, what type of collateral should I require?
  • Which business advisors should I consult with while securing all the required contracts and other paperwork? Besides business and tax lawyers, do the specific assets of my company require me to consult with real estate agents, insurance and business brokers, bankers and financial advisors?

It’s often wise to start this process by locating and reviewing all your current business contracts and deeds. Next, give some thought to your company’s most productive and respected employees. Then, carefully determine the current market value of every business asset. Finally, schedule confidential, preliminary talks with any co-owners, family members who work for you, other key employees and perhaps one or two other potential buyers of your company.

Once these initial tasks have been handled – or while you’re completing them – it’s wise to meet with your Houston business law attorney.

Advantages and disadvantages of selling to different parties

Unless you’re the sole owner of the company and simply want to liquidate all the business assets and not sell (or transfer) the company to others, you must carefully evaluate each potential buyer and decide which one is best qualified to run the company in your absence.

  1. One or more family members. In most instances, it’s usually best to sell to only one family member, preferably one who is already involved in the business and respected by your employees. Ask your attorney about the best ways to prevent future challenges to any decision you make. One approach might involve drafting a buy-sell agreement that clearly states who is going to be running the company — and asks all others who currently work there (or own shares) — to sell their shares to the person you’ve named as your successor. This approach often helps minimize future family disagreements.

When selling a business to a family member, you may want to execute a self-canceling installment note (SCIN). Your attorney can explain why that may be useful;

  1. A key employee who is highly knowledgeable and well liked by other workers. The most common drawback to selling to a key employee is that the person may not be able to give you a large down payment in cash. Be prepared to execute a buy-sell agreement that clearly lists all the valuable collateral for any loan you may be willing to finance. You can also suggest that this employee try to obtain an SBA (Small Business Administration) or bank acquisition loan that will provide you with up to 70% or more of the purchase price upfront;
  2. You can sell your shares to your co-owners. Be sure to clearly indicate the sale’s price and all purchase terms;
  3. An outside third-party or competitor. Be very careful when selling to this type of buyer if you’re financially depending on the person to keep running the company. Due diligence is critical when evaluating every potential buyer.

Since this article only provides a broad overview of the types of issues involved when drafting a business succession plan, you’ll need to obtain competent legal help to handle this entire process. Should you already have some type of succession plan, we can help you decide if it’s time to update it.

All our Murray Lobb attorneys have the necessary experience to help you create a business succession plan that’s specifically tailored to your company’s unique needs. We look forward to helping you draft all the contracts and other documents you’ll need while selling your business.