Handling Your Adult Child’s Estate in Texas

Losing a child of any age remains one of life’s most difficult challenges. When that child is an adult, you may often need legal advice on how to manage any estate left behind, even if it’s rather limited. Now that so many Americans are living well into their 70s and 80s, the chances of losing an adult child are growing.

One study found that 11.5 percent of people age 50 or older have lost at least one adult child. That likelihood of loss is even higher for African Americans – 16.7 percent of them have lost an adult child. Furthermore, the older you get, the sense of loss can be even harder to cope with since adult children are often the closest caregivers of their aging parents.

Here’s a look at some of the legal questions you’ll need to address after losing an adult child.

Issues Surviving Parents May Need to Face After an Adult Child Passes Away:

  • Did your son or daughter live with and leave behind a spouse or partner? If so, calmly reach out to that person to find out if there’s a Will naming the personal representative of the estate. If your child didn’t have a Will or named someone else as the executor of their Will, you’ll need to interact very sensitively with that person. When you contact your Houston estate planning lawyer, be prepared to indicate your adult child’s marital status at the time of death;
  • Did your adult child have any children? It’s important to stay on good terms with your loved one’s surviving spouse or partner since visitation rights and overall family harmony may depend upon your relationship with that person. (Note: If the surviving spouse or partner has any major substance abuse problems, be sure to share that information with your lawyer. We can explain pertinent child custody and adoption laws, if necessary);
  • Did your son or daughter own considerable land or personal property? Your attorney can help you try to prevent anyone from giving away or disposing of such property before the estate can be probated – or passed on according to your adult child’s estate plan. If you’ve been named the personal representative, obtain a copy of the Will as soon as possible. If no one is living in your adult child’s former house or apartment, be sure someone visits soon to look for pets needing immediate care, valuables that must be secured and vehicles that must be locked and placed in a garage;
  • Contacting your adult child’s employer. If you were named as your adult child’s personal representative, you’ll soon need to contact that employer to find out what employee assets may still be held in a 401k or other account. Likewise, you’ll want to find out if any other benefits are still owing to your child – and if s/he held any type of insurance policy through the employer;
  • What should you do about burial, cremation and related issues? Always try to honor the instructions in your deceased child’s Will or other legal documents. If you can’t find a Will, then work with any surviving spouse/partner and other family members to handle this matter in keeping with your family’s faith practices or general traditions;
  • Do you know what to expect under Texas law if your adult child died intestate – without a Will or some other type of estate plan?  Your Houston estate planning attorney can explain how Texas courts address this type of situation. We can also inform you about how estates are handled by probate courts and how you should manage other tasks that are often required after losing an adult child.

Please know that since our firm has worked with many clients grieving over the loss of loved ones. We’ll provide our legal advice in the most caring manner possible. When you contact one of our Murray Lobb attorneys, we’ll be ready to provide you with simple steps to take so you can concentrate on obtaining comfort from family and friends.

What Types of Deceptive Trade Practices Are Forbidden in Texas?

Too many Texas consumers regularly lose money on purchases due to misleading advertising and fraudulent business practices. When those events occur – especially when large sums of money are involved – it’s often necessary to contact the Consumer Protection Division of the Texas Attorney General’s Office. That division is charged with enforcing the Texas Deceptive Trade Practices Act (DTPA) that’s set forth in the Texas Business and Commerce Code.

A Consumer Protective Division lawyer must then investigate the consumer complaint and decide if any legal remedy like an injunction must be pursued. The wronged consumer should also consider hiring a Houston business law attorney to file a lawsuit seeking Texas DTPA damages from the merchant or company that allegedly violated the DTPA.

Here’s a brief look at those who may want to file these types of complaints and lawsuits, followed by a review of some of the commonly alleged DTPA violations — and the basic types of civil damages available to plaintiffs who win these kinds of cases.

The general categories of plaintiffs under the Texas Deceptive Trade Practices Act

  • The average, individual consumer buying property or goods. When buying a home, a car, indoor furnishings or other personal property, a consumer has the right to complete such transactions without being fraudulently manipulated by false advertising or other schemes that cause the loss of hard-earned money;
  • Those seeking repairs (or other types of service) work. Consumers must be quoted fair and accurate rates. They must also be provided with correct information about the training and experience of those who will be performing the requested services;
  • Individuals or companies seeking to close expensive business transactions, within certain established financial limitations. For example, a person or company seeking to buy a business franchise worth three hundred thousand dollars will usually be covered. However, the Texas DTPA is not intended to cover any business consumer with assets worth more than $25 million or more – or a business entity with $25 million (or more) in assets that’s controlled or owned by another business or corporation that has assets valued at or above $25 million.

Types of complaints and claims often brought under the Texas DTPA

Since highly diverse claims are covered by this statute, the following list only provides a general sampling of the complaints often alleged by consumers.

  • Being sold goods or services that were not actually made by the company that claimed to have created or provided them. In other words, the seller tried to mislead the buyer as to the true maker or provider of what was being sold;
  • Buyers were intentionally misled as to where certain goods or services originated. It’s against the law to sell goods claiming they were grown or made in a specific country when the seller knew that wasn’t true. Likewise, you cannot advertise that certain services will be provided by employees or contractors from one city or region who will be coming from another location;
  • Advertising goods or services as having the approval or sponsorship of specific individuals or groups when that’s a fraudulent claim. For example, you cannot sell certain medical devices and claim they’re backed by the American Medical Association (or a local medical group) when that’s untrue. Likewise, there can be no attempt to claim that the seller had direct ties to another specific company or government entity when that’s a fraudulent misrepresentation;
  • Selling goods or services and saying that they meet certain objective standards (or are made of specific types of materials) when that’s an intentional misrepresentation. For example, a company cannot claim that a couch was made of leather when it knew it was made of Naugahyde. Likewise, a company cannot claim all service personnel have earned specific licensing credentials – or are bonded – when it knows that’s false information;
  • Making purposeful “bait-and switch” sales. It’s a deceptive trade practice to run a print ad (or an online or televised commercial) that states that a store is selling a specific brand of products – or providing a certain grade of service by specially trained personnel – when the seller knows those facts to be false. Likewise, a company cannot claim that highly experienced contractors with over 10 years of experience are being sent to someone’s home to repair a major roof leak – when the actual workers have very little experience handling such tasks;
  • Misleading the buying public as to why certain goods are being sold at a major discount. For example, a merchant cannot claim that an accidental, large shipment of goods came in and they must now be sold at a greatly reduced price – when that merchant is really trying to unload damaged goods on unsuspecting buyers;
  • Selling a car, truck or other vehicle after rolling back the odometer. When a seller has any reason to believe that someone has reset or rolled back an odometer – or has personally done so because that part stopped recording mileage – all such facts must be fully disclosed to each potential buyer;
  • Taking advantage of the buying public after a natural disaster has been formally declared by the state’s governor. The DTPA does not allow anyone to sell goods at excessive or unfair prices, especially after a natural disaster like a flood. Therefore, no store can charge inflated prices for necessities like water, food, fuel, flashlights, batteries or medicine.

While this list isn’t comprehensive, it should provide a clear idea of the types of fraud and misrepresentation that can cause lawyers with the Texas Attorney General’s Consumer Protection Division – and individual consumers — to pursue through DTPA litigation.

Penalties or damages that can be sought for Texas DTPA violations 

As your personal lawyer will tell you, the Texas Attorney General’s public remedies may include different types of injunctions, restraining orders and penalties. Should you file a private lawsuit, the penalties awarded to you can be influenced by whether the wrongful conduct was knowingly committed. When a violation of the DTPA was “knowingly” committed, penalties are sometimes awarded at the level of three times the sum awarded for the economic damages.

If you believe your consumer rights under the Texas DTPA have been violated, you should contact one of our Murray Lobb attorneys. We can provide you with the timely advice you’ll need while we help you decide whether to file a DTPA lawsuit on your behalf.

EEOC Guidelines: Training Employees About Workplace Discrimination

To create and maintain a professional work environment, employers must make sure everyone interacts in a respectful manner. The best way to promote respect is to provide proper employee training that carefully defines discriminatory behavior and clearly states what won’t be tolerated.

Newly hired employees should always be trained, even if this must be done individually. They must learn how to recognize forbidden forms of discrimination. Periodic retraining on sexual harassment and other common forms of discrimination should also be mandatory. If you don’t already have a hard copy or online employee handbook that clearly sets forth your workplace standards on discrimination, you can ask your Houston employment law attorney to help you draft one.

Here’s a review of the types of workplace discrimination and harassment that should be clearly forbidden in writing and during oral training sessions. After presenting information on these topics to all your employees, it’s best to also provide a bit more in-depth training to your supervisors and managers who will need to handle the discipline, complaints and investigations usually involved with reported acts of alleged discrimination.

What types of workplace discrimination are most common today?

  • Treating others differently due to their race, skin color, ethnic background or country of natural origin. No job applicant or employee should ever be treated unfairly due to any of these facts or traits. When investigating this type of claim, you may need to privately admonish and inform the wrongdoer that such behavior is legally forbidden and can lead to dismissal. (In egregious cases, immediate firing may be required.) Employers should keep detailed notes about all such complaints and formal reprimands. It’s wise to always have disciplined employees sign and date forms indicating that they’ve been warned that additional acts of discrimination may lead to dismissal. All employee files and complaints must be kept safely locked up and only accessed by a few managers;
  • Discrimination based upon a person’s sex including sexual harassment or current pregnancy status. All workers must learn to respect their coworkers, regardless of another employee’s sex. Stay open to questions and provide answers that are clearly supported by your company’s anti-discrimination policies;
  • Disability status. Regardless of whether someone was born with a physical disability or acquired one later in life, every effort must be made to help that person handle his/her job, unless doing so would place an undue burden on the employer. (Requests may often involve making facilities more accessible or changing an employee’s work schedule so it will interfere less with a medical disability);
  • Age. When workers are young, it’s hard for them to believe that age discrimination is real. However, as they grow older, they’ll start noticing how the most desirable promotions are often given to younger staff members – and not to older workers. And older workers often find themselves in the groups being laid off when a company claims it’s going through hard times. This type of discrimination is often self-defeating since older workers often: (1) have excellent problem-solving skills due to all their experience, (2) usually enjoy learning new skills and helping to train newcomers – and (3) often have the lowest rates of absenteeism due to their dedication to their employers;
  • Religion. Sadly, although most American adults know that one main reason this country was founded was to extend religious freedom to all citizens, too many people today treat coworkers with disrespect when they appear to follow faith practices different than their own;
  • Discrimination related to an employee’s genetic information (or family medical history). Both state and federal laws forbid this type of discrimination. One of the federal laws is named the Genetic Information Non-Discrimination Act (GINA). Title II of GINA specifically prohibits workplace discrimination based upon an employee’s genetic information. Employers must exercise great care when hiring the employees who must handle all company medical insurance and claim forms. These workers must understand that any knowledge they accidentally gain about an employee’s medical condition(s) or family history must be held in the strictest confidence.

Special training for company managers and supervisors

An additional, separate training should be periodically presented to these employees to be sure they fully understand how to handle every discrimination complaint they receive. After all, they will be playing a key role in investigating these complaints and making sure they handle their responsibilities in strict compliance with all state and federal laws.

Be sure that these higher-level employees have made the complaint process both easy and transparent for workers. It’s their job to remind employees that they will not be punished for coming forward with claims – or acting as witnesses for those who are filing claims.

In your special training program for these workers, be sure to also address the following topics.

  • Managers must understand that detailed, investigative notes must be kept. When an employee files a complaint based on alleged acts of discrimination or harassment, you need to obtain information about each time such acts were committed and get the names of all possible witnesses. Dates and times are crucial bits of information. If more than one person was involved in the illegal behavior, be sure to write down all names – and speak with each of these individuals separately;
  • All managers and supervisors need clear definitions of what can constitute a “reasonable accommodation” for a disabled employee. It’s a good idea to review the content of your training with your attorney prior to making this type of presentation;
  • Retaliation. Inform higher-level employees that all forms of retaliation for reporting alleged acts of discrimination or harassment are strictly forbidden – and can result in liability for those involved;
  • Acceptable religious attire, hairstyles and practices. Explain to your managers what type of religious clothing is fully acceptable in the workplace. You should also tell them which hair or beard styles should be allowed, based upon an employee’s stated religious beliefs. When possible, managers should try to accommodate time off from work to attend special worship services – if doing so won’t cause an undue burden on co-workers or the company;
  • Sexual harassment. Supervisors and managers must be fully acquainted with all the types of language and behavior that can constitute sexual harassment. Remind them that offensive cartoons or signs related to sex should never be posted or circulated at work;
  • Privacy is crucial to all investigations. Remind all of those involved with investigating any claims of discrimination or harassment that they must never share any information they gain with non-investigative employees – or anyone outside of the company – since confidentiality is critical for everyone.

Please feel free to contact one of our Murray Lobb attorneys if you have any questions about how you’ve drafted portions of your employee handbook, especially sections addressing discrimination and sexual harassment. We can provide you with useful advice and are always available to help should an employee file a claim with you or the EEOC alleging any form of workplace discrimination.