Key Issues Targeted by EEOC in Recent Lawsuits Filed Against Employers

Periodically reviewing the most recent cases filed by the EEOC (Equal Employment Opportunity Commission) against various companies can help remind your office of the federal employment rights that must be regularly extended to all job applicants and current employees.

Far too often, employers fail to protect workers against hostile work environments and many different forms of harassment and discrimination.  Employees being sexually or racially harassed can never do their best work. This also holds true for people mistreated due to physical disabilities, religious beliefs – or their national origin. These types of illegal activities are constantly monitored by the EEOC so that equal employment rights can be guaranteed to everyone trying to get hired or hold down a job.

What follows is a brief review of some recent cases filed by the EEOC against companies they believe have violated federal employment laws. While some of these actions have been resolved, others are still awaiting a final ruling.

New EEOC cases reveal the broad spectrum of employment rights regularly enforced

  • A Dallas pregnancy discrimination case was decided against the employer. A receptionist working for Smiley Dental Walnut spoke to human resources to inform them that she was pregnant. After being ordered to tell her supervisor this news, the young woman complied. During the conversation with her supervisor – who noted that she did not wish to keep training the young woman since she might leave relatively soon — the pregnant employee was fired.

The U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Texas, Dallas Division, ruled against the employer. Attempts to settle prior to litigation failed. Injunctive relief (sought to make sure the company never repeated this same type of illegal behavior in the future) was sought and awarded – along with back pay and other damages. The company was ordered to pay $20,000 to the wronged employee;

  • Walmart was ordered to pay $5.2 million for intentional discrimination against a disabled employee. The mistreated worker had dutifully worked around his developmental disability, deafness, and visual difficulties for 16 years. However, a new store manager came in and demanded that new medical paperwork be submitted to document all the employee’s disabilities. The disabled employee was then suspended temporarily from his job.     

However, once the requested paperwork was produced, Walmart cut off further communications with the disabled man — basically resulting in his termination. The EEOC prevailed in this case in which $5 million of the award was for punitive damages;

  • Two female nurses filed an EEOC complaint about unequal pay. The women had job experience equal to that of a male nurse – yet the women were paid less. All three nurses complained about this issue. The EEOC won the case on behalf of the female nurses, noting the importance of closing the pay gap that often works against women in this country;
  • A case was filed involving discrimination based on national origin and religion. Three Pennsylvania employees from Puerto Rico were working for a caster and wheel company when they were subjected to workplace harassment based on their national origin and their religious (Pentecostal) beliefs. Oddly enough, it was the plant manager who was making the derogatory remarks when the harassed employees decided to report his illegal and upsetting behavior. The three employees were then subjected to retaliation (in the form of lesser work assignments) for complaining about the way they were being treated.

The EEOC stated in its pleadings that company managers should always act respectfully as role models—and never be the ones who harass their own employees;                                          

  • A sexual harassment lawsuit was filed on behalf of two female employees. The EEOC alleged in its lawsuit that the defendant hospitality companies created an abusive and hostile working environment for two of its female employees. The women complained about sexually rude comments and behavior directed toward them by their manager.

When the employees complained to their supervisors and others, nothing was done to improve their situation. In this case, a request was made for both compensatory and punitive damages – along with back pay for the two women. This suit is still pending;

  • A disability discrimination case was filed based on the way a hearing impaired job applicant was treated. When a problem arose during the hiring process related to the applicant’s hearing disability, the employer failed to accommodate her reasonable request to simply be interviewed in person and not over the phone. The company never responded to the job applicant’s email proposing this simple alternative.

Instead, four other applicants (who didn’t require any type of accommodation) were then interviewed and one of them was chosen for the job opening. The EEOC lawsuit requests lost wages, punitive and compensatory damages – and injunctive relief to prevent the employer from repeating this type of discrimination against other job applicants (or employees) who have disabilities in the future;

  • A racial slurs and harassment case. A man hired as a deckhand by a New Orleans transportation company was subjected to offensive racial epithets and conduct. When the man asked for help in stopping this behavior, the situation did not improve. Soon thereafter, a rope tied in the form of a noose was dropped near this harassed man on the deck where he was working.

The EEOC described these wrongful acts as “deeply offensive.” The government is seeking injunctive relief against the transportation company – along with compensatory and punitive damages — and any other relief the court decides is necessary.

Each of these new cases and decisions document how common intentional acts of workplace discrimination still are in this country. All employers should consider requiring annual training for every employee in hopes of seriously discouraging all forms of workplace discrimination and harassment.

Should you need help interpreting any of the federal (state or local) laws that are designed to protect employee rights, please contact one of our Murray Lobb attorneys. We’ll be glad to help you analyze any problems that you may have — or help you draft any new workplace contracts or employee handbook sections related to this (or any other employment law) topic.

Overview of Small Business Administration Online Courses

Ever since our government created the SBA (Small Business Administration) back in 1953, it’s been working hard to promote, assist and protect America’s small business interests. Chief among its goals is to help entrepreneurs as they try to create and “grow” new companies.

During recent years, the SBA has been offering online courses that can help people focus in on creating viable business plans – while also securing adequate funding for their initial marketing and other needs. Whether your business is still in the planning stages – or already gaining traction – you can benefit by taking several of these courses.

SBA classes can greatly help many business owners

  • The All Small Mentor-Protégé Program. Like most of the courses offered, this one allows you to glance at a course transcript or outline before starting the class. This 30-minute program is designed to help entrepreneurs decide if they’re businesses are ready to sell goods or services to the federal government. If you believe your business is ready, you can take this course and use the certification of completion while applying for acceptance into this mentor-protégé program;
  • Business opportunities. This 30-minute class (offered on a self-paced basis), helps entrepreneurs learn how federal contract procedures work and what they must first do before trying to sell goods to the federal government;
  • A course on gaining a competitive advantage for your company. This SBA class teaches students how to accurately evaluate their competition, create a brand, seek out potential customers and decide how best to set prices for their goods and services;
  • Financing your business. There are many ways to come up with the money you’ll need besides funding it yourself or obtaining a bank loan. This class explains the basics facts about venture capital, crowdfunding, angel investors, grants and other sources. You’ll also gain a better idea how to figure out your exact start-up costs and other expenses;
  • Legal requirements for a small business. This course explains many basic aspects of employment law that must be understood before trying to start a company. One key topic looks at how you must responsibly hire and fire employees. Be sure to speak with your Houston business law attorney during the earliest stages of starting your company to make sure you’re complying with all applicable state, local and federal laws;
  • Social media marketing. Every small business owner must learn how to properly market goods and service to the public using social media platforms like Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, LinkedIn, YouTube, Tumblr and others. This course also teaches students how to reach their prime or target audiences based on such factors as age and location;
  • Growing an established company.  At some point, most companies find themselves facing unexpected competition or a change in market forces that makes them need to retool their approach to winning new customers. This class will help you determine if your company is ready to expand and how to carry out that goal. It also teaches important growth strategies;
  • A course on buying a company already in business. Terms like due diligence are explained so that students will understand the critical need to learn all they can about any business before buying it,
  • The special cybersecurity needs of small businesses. This course helps acquaint owners with some of the ways they can try to protect themselves against major cyber threats that can take down websites and otherwise disrupt normal business transactions. There’s also a related class that describes useful ways to prevent general crimes from being committed against your company.

All the courses referenced above may prove useful to a large percentage of new businesses (or those needing to reinvent themselves). The following brief synopses are related to classes created for unique groups of entrepreneurs.

SBA classes designed for the needs of specific individuals and groups

  • Special contracting opportunities for veteran entrepreneurs. Nearly one in ten U. S. businesses are owned by military veterans. Since these men and women often face special burdens after serving our country, the government has created unique programs to help them find profitable ways to support themselves and provide jobs to others;
  • A course designed for Spanish-speaking young people. Titled Jovenes Emprendedores, this class provides key guidance for those who need business training materials taught and presented in Spanish). There is also a class designed for young entrepreneurs who are native English speakers;
  • Business development class for Native American businesses. Students in this class will learn more about the 8 (a) Business Development Program that’s been specially set up to help many small business owners facing economic disadvantages;
  • Entrepreneurship program for women over 50. Given the high number of seniors now needing to remain in the workforce past normal retirement age, this course is perfect for older women wanting to get new businesses off to a good start. Those who take this course may also want to review the materials designed for the more general WOSB (women-owned small business) Advantage class.

The courses referenced above are just a sampling of the roughly 63 free classes available to anyone who has 30 minutes (or more) to spend mastering these core topics. Should you decide to contact the SBA directly or online, they may be able to provide you with additional online and community resources that can help you get your business off to a promising start.

Please feel free to contact one of our Murray Lobb attorneys while trying to start up a new company – or purchasing one that’s already helping customers. We appreciate the opportunity to help all our clients succeed in all their new business endeavors.

Update: Department of Labor Issues New Rule on Overtime Pay

The Department of Labor issued a final rule in September of 2019 that could allow an additional 1.3 million more American workers to become eligible to receive overtime pay. This new rule becomes effective on January 1, 2020.

One key focus of the new rule is to update the earning thresholds that exempt certain professional, executive and administrative employees from the FLSA (Fair Labor Standards Act) minimum wage and overtime pay guidelines. The new rule is also designed to allow employers to count portions of some bonuses and commissions toward meeting the required salary level.

These adjustments are being made to recognize the increase in employee earnings that have occurred since these salary thresholds were last reviewed in 2004.

Earning levels and other specific issues addressed by the new DOL rule

  • Changes are being made to the “standard salary level.” At present, the enforced earning level is $455 per week – and that’s being raised to $684 per week (or $35,568 for an entire year);
  • There’s an increase in the total annual compensation requirements for workers categorized as “highly compensated employees.” The current enforced level of $100,000 a year is now being raised to $107,432 annually;
  • Employers can now count nondiscretionary incentive payments, bonuses and commissions paid at least once annually. These sums can now be added to help satisfy as much as 10% of what’s now known as the standard salary level – recognizing how pay practices are evolving;
  • Salary levels have now been revised for specific groups of workers. These include people who labor in U. S. territories – or individuals employed by the motion picture industry.

Some of the many earlier overtime pay guidelines that still apply

  • Unlimited overtime hours.  The FLSA (Fair Labor Standards Act) still allows exempt employees age 16 and older to work an unlimited number of overtime hours during any one workweek;
  • Timely payment of overtime. Employers must pay for all hours worked, including overtime, on each regular pay day;
  • When overtime pay is required. Once a non-exempt worker has put in at least 40 hours during any one calendar workweek (which can begin on any day of the week), the overtime pay rate applies.

If you have any questions about how the new DOL overtime pay rule may affect your workforce, please give one of our Murray Lobb attorneys a call. We’re also available to provide legal advice on many other important topics – and can draft any contracts or other documents you may need.