Legal Documents Often Needed by Caregivers

Careful planning is required once you agree to act as the legal caregiver of a family member or close friend. Always make sure the person making this request promptly provides you with copies of properly executed legal documents that will help you address their most critical needs on a timely basis.

Fortunately, your Houston estate planning attorney can help you decide which legal documents may be required by the person needing care. These documents can help you make such crucial decisions as where the person needing care may want to live — and choose the types of medical care they’re willing to receive from specific healthcare providers.

Depending on if you’re personally named in all the required documents, you may also need to handle burial needs – and make sure that all money and possessions are properly transferred to the correct beneficiaries once your loved one or ailing friend passes away.

Here’s a brief overview of the types of legal documents you’ll need the person you’ll be taking care of to obtain from a lawyer.

Key documents to consult while taking care of an ailing friend or family member

  • Power of Attorney. While many older or ailing adults can still often make sound decisions for themselves – they may want you to stand ready to step in and handle key business transactions for them with various companies should they become too ill to manage these matters on a temporary basis;
  • Durable Power of Attorney for Healthcare. This may also be called an Advance Directive for Healthcare and other similar terms. Its purpose is to clearly indicate the types of medical care the named party is open to receiving – and when certain types of life-extending treatments should be discontinued when the party named in the documents is suffering from a terminal or irreversible condition. The document also clearly provides authority for the person named as the Medical Power of Attorney to have full access to all medical records required while making decisions in coordination with doctors and other healthcare providers;
  • A Living Will. This document is different than an Advance Directive because it states how the person needing medical treatment wants their medical care to be handled – as opposed to the Advance Directive which states how another person (the agent) should handle the ill person’s medical treatment needs when that person is unable to do so. This type of Will also often addresses whether life support procedures should be provided under specific circumstances;
  • A Basic Will. This sets forth the name of the executor who’s been chosen to manage the ill person’s estate once they pass away — so the chosen beneficiaries will receive all the designated wealth and possessions. Hopefully, the person you’re helping will remember to ask their lawyer if they need to create one or more trust accounts so that all or part of the estate can be easily transferred without going through the probate process.

Be sure the person you’ll be taking care of informs their lawyer about any unusual or special circumstances that may need to be addressed in all the documents named above.

You may also want to obtain a document sometimes referred to as an Appointment of Agent to Control Disposition of Remains. This will allow the older or disabled person needing your care to state who will handle their remains once a funeral home has prepared them for burial (or placement in an urn). Many people today who’ve chosen to be cremated obtain this form, so they can state the location of a specific cemetery or columbarium where their remains will be interred.

Please feel free to have the person who’s asked you to act as caregiver to contact one of our Murray Lobb attorneys so we can help prepare all of these important legal documents. We are always available to respond to any questions you may have regarding any of these documents and the entire estate planning and probate process.

Creative Planning for Your Senior Years Should Begin Now

Creative Planning for Your Senior Years Should Begin Now

Just as most younger people make detailed plans before entering college or starting their careers, older Americans must also carefully plan how they want to live out the last decades of their lives. If you’ll start this process early, you’re much more likely to have many positive options and choices available.

Yet before older Americans or “seniors” start thinking about vacations and other pleasure pursuits – it’s crucial to first address such basic needs as finances, housing and medical care. A good way to start this process is by asking yourself each of the following questions.

  • What family, financial and legal resources do I currently have?
  • When – and in what order — should I begin drawing upon those resources in the most efficient manner?
  • If I’m short on all or most resources – how can I immediately begin creating a supportive community of friends, relatives and others to help me?

Your financial and legal resources require immediate planning and regular oversight

You’ll always need to know more than just how much money you have and how quickly you can liquidate it in case of an emergency. Although it’s important to be able to access large amounts of money should you or your spouse require immediate medical care that isn’t readily covered by insurance, there are other more critical issues you should address first.

Stated simply, everyone needs to secure Medical Power of Attorney documents, a Will and other supporting documents. You can easily acquire this paperwork by meeting with your Houston estate planning lawyer long before you reach your senior years. This will help you obtain the best medical care available – in keeping with your preferences.  You can also inquire about other documents that can grant trusted individuals the right to handle your finances (especially if you’re single without adult children) if you become temporarily incapacitated.

Given how many older Americans now live alone, these matters should never be postponed. As of 2010, about 12% of women between the ages of 80 and 84 were unmarried and childless. By 2018, some experts predict that about 16% of women in that age group will fit that description.

Of course, many men may also have similar needs since the average woman only outlives the average male by a few years.

Once you and your attorney have created all this legal paperwork, be sure to give copies to trusted relatives or friends so that they can make sure you obtain the care you need right when you need it the most.

If you’re age sixty and single (or even if married) – start proactively deciding where you’ll live Afraid to face the reality of eventual death, too many people refuse to move into proper housing before their health seriously deteriorates. When this happens, helpful family members or friends are often greatly inconvenienced by your avoidable tardiness.

Give serious thought to moving into a place now that offers different levels of care. Otherwise, if a sudden emergency develops, you might not wind up where you want to be. Try looking for unique living arrangements where seniors can blend in with others of all ages. Places like Hope Meadows are often a blessing to many.

Think positive if you have little money – consider part-time work – and keep socializing

Stay active pursuing activities that are meaningful, useful and fun. As you get to know others better, you may want to suggest becoming part of each other’s support network. Friendships with others of all ages can prove very beneficial to everyone involved.

If you currently have a tech-savvy friend or family member — and want to live at home as long as possible — be sure to check out the newest “apps” that can help keep you and your financial world safe.

Always be kind to yourself. If current media articles make you feel that you made poor choices in the past regarding marriage and children, keep in mind that married couples (and older singles) with children don’t always “have it made” regarding help while growing older. Many of these people have adult children who: (1) live far away, (2) are estranged from them, (3) are coping with serious addictions – or are (4) barely staying afloat in their own busy family and work lives.

Finally, since so many entrepreneurs are now rushing into the “longevity market,” you must make sure you’re interacting with reputable people and not scam artists. Just because someone is financially “bonded” to do their work, doesn’t mean they’ll do what’s best for you. Stay in touch with your lawyer and always have at least one trusted friend help you make critical decisions.

Please feel free to schedule an appointment with one of our Murray Lobb attorneys so we can help you prepare all the estate planning legal paperwork that you need. We can also review any contracts you’re being asked to sign regarding a continuing care retirement community (CCRC). We look forward to being of service to you.

Some Pros and Cons of Having an Adult Guardian Appointed

While most middle-aged and older adults recognize their need for a Will and a basic estate plan, far fewer understand when it may (or may not) be in their best interest to have a formal guardian appointed to help them manage all their personal and financial (estate) decisions. In general, if you’re still capable of making fully competent decisions regarding your finances, basic living arrangements, and medical care needs, you probably don’t need a guardian appointed for you.

However, if you’re currently suffering from some form of mental incapacity or dementia that impairs your ability to handle such matters, then you may need to have a guardian appointed to help you manage your affairs (either temporarily or permanently).

This article first reviews some of the dangers that can occur when the wrong person becomes your guardian and then lists the various legal documents that can help all adults provide for their general medical, financial, and everyday needs should they unexpectedly become very ill or need extensive medical treatment.

Can Courts Abruptly Take Away Elderly People’s Rights to Live as They Choose?

The New Yorker magazine recently published an article in October 2017 entitled, “How the Elderly Lose Their Rights.” It details the real-life experience of many seniors who suddenly found themselves under the control of a “questionable” court-appointed guardian in Clark County, Nevada. In some cases, these older Americans were in regular contact with family members – when a local court guardian decided that they could no longer live on their own and required her overbearing control of their lives.

In some instances, all it took was a hired home healthcare aide’s statement that the elderly person could no longer properly care for himself or his spouse, even though appropriate outside care had obviously been employed for such purposes. One court guardian (who’s been indicted for her actions), would simply arrive at an elderly person’s apartment or senior care facility and announce that she had just gotten herself appointed as that person’s (or couple’s) legal guardian. That same day, the individuals were then forced to leave where they had been living and go move in where this previously unknown woman directed.

Immediate attempts by family and other outsiders who tried to help proved futile. Instead of the court allowing the elderly to appear in court to respond to concerns about their mental competency, the court allowed a court-appointed, professional guardian to file emergency ex parte petitions indicating that immediate decisions had to be made regarding the seniors’ best interests. One couple’s daughter who tried to help her parents after they suddenly disappeared from their home had to endure various types of character assassination before she finally won their freedom. By that time, all her parent’s finances had been drained – supposedly spent in their best interests.

Sadly, the article also contains the chilling observation that this type of elder abuse has become far too common in many counties across this nation – especially in areas where seniors tend to congregate. Hopefully, more states will follow Nevada’s current plans to soon pass legislation that will expressly give seniors the right to be represented by attorneys during all guardianship competency hearings.

Conclusions

Since no adult ever wants to be suddenly “kidnapped”  or taken somewhere (at any age) by a court-appointed guardian or “professional” — it makes sense for all older adults to have their lawyers provide them with the following critical documents:  an Advance Directive for Medical Care, a Durable Power of Attorney and a Declaration of Guardian in the Event of Later Incapacity or Need of Guardian. By naming someone you know and trust in these documents, it should make it easier for your relatives and friends to help you in a manner that fully comports with your stated preferences should you one day become very ill or incapacitated.

Please contact our law firm if you need to ask any questions about creating an estate plan or having the types of documents referenced in this article prepared for you and other loved ones.