Drafting Valid Texas Non-Compete Agreements

Although Texas courts will uphold valid non-compete agreements, they expect these documents to contain clear and reasonable terms. In addition, Texas employers can only execute these types of ancillary agreements when they’re directly related to a main document like a valid employment contract.

Companies that ask workers to sign these agreements must also make sure they’re offering proper “consideration” to each employee. Simply providing someone with continued employment will not be considered adequate. The employer must be offering such valid “consideration” as a definite plan to share highly valuable “trade secrets” or unique, proprietary information with each employee required to sign a non-compete agreement.

Basic terminology regarding these agreements

Covenants not to compete are also sometimes referred to as non-compete agreements or “non-solicit” agreements. That latter term refers to the departing employee’s promise not to solicit any of the former employer’s customers until after a set time period noted in the agreement has ended.

In some cases, the shared information might just be limited to the the names and addresses of the employer’s current customers. Of course, the validity of all terms set forth in a non-compete agreement may one day be subject to a court’s interpretation.

What follows is a closer look at the terms and definitions governing Texas non-compete agreements. They’re set forth in Section 15.50 (and following) of the Texas Business and Commerce Code. Stated succinctly, non-compete agreements must set forth reasonable time limitations, detail the scope of activities to be restrained – and describe the geographical area to be covered. This article concludes with a discussion of how you and your Houston employment law attorney should respond if you learn that a former employee has violated his/her covenant not to compete.

A reasonable limitation on the geographical area you seek to control

Stated simply, your agreement will probably be viewed as valid by a court if it only restricts the former employee from competing against you (or working for a competitor of yours) within the same basic geographical area where s/he worked while still employed by you. While a broader area might be considered legitimate, you might have to justify that to a court one day, based on unique aspects of your business industry or other similar issues.

Courts often frown upon these types of covenants when they’re overly broad. The law favors free trade and competition unless a greater employer right (or threat to employer interests) can be clearly established.

A reasonable time period is referenced for restricting the former employee’s activities

Although there don’t seem to be any legal experts willing to name a specific time period you should choose, the consensus appears to be that you shouldn’t make this part of the covenant unduly burdensome.

Speaking in very general terms, if you name a time period much longer than one or two years, (directly dependent on the nature of your company’s work), your lawyer may have to justify that longer time period in court. After all, people are entitled to move on with their lives, regardless of whether you fired them — or they simply wanted to do something new in their work lives.

The scope of the activities being restricted must be fair and reasonable

You normally cannot completely restrict a departing employee’s best options for finding new work. For example, assume an employee has worked exclusively in the computer field for all his or her life, up until leaving your firm. A court would probably consider it overly burdensome if your non-compete agreement forbids that person from accepting or soliciting all types of work in that very broad field.

However, if that employee provided you with highly specific work in a unique sub-field of computer science, you might be able place a restriction on that type of work for a relatively short period of time. Reasonableness is crucial.

What can you do if you discover a former employee is violating a non-compete agreement?

      A. When the questionable behavior does not raise an urgent concern

If that former employee signed what you believe is an enforceable covenant not to compete, you can ask your Houston employment law attorney to take one or more actions on your behalf. However, if the need to stop the past employee from further infringing your rights is not immediate, your lawyer can start by sending the former employee a letter, reminding him/her of the agreement and of your belief that s/he is likely violating it and must stop doing so.

Should you again learn that the former employee is still violating your agreement, you can also contact that individual’s employer and state your concerns, noting the earlier letter sent by your attorney.  If the infringing activity continues, you can file a lawsuit. (Employers are often tipped off about such questionable behavior by current, loyal customers who’ve been recently contacted by the former employee.)

     B. When the wrongful behavior could cause immediate damage to your company

If you believe that you’re about to suffer irreparable harm due to the former employee’s current use of your company’s “trade secrets” or contact with your customers, your lawyer can ask a court to issue an injunction. If granted, this should put an immediate stop to the alleged, illegal activities.

Should the judge decide that the current threat posed to your company is highly significant, s/he can even grant a temporary restraining order (TRO) that prohibits the former employee from doing anything further that could violate the agreement until a first hearing can be held. Anyone who ignores a TRO (or violates one) can be treated as being in contempt of court. That person can then be punished with a fine, some form of imprisonment – or even possibly both.

Conclusion

Always remember that Texas courts demand that all terms in your non-compete agreement be reasonable. Former employees do have a right to move on with their lives and find new opportunities to support themselves that do not directly interfere with your business or its current viability.

Our Murray Lobb attorneys welcome requests for legal advice about covenants not to compete and other employment law issues. We’re also fully equipped to address most corporate and business law matters, as well as your estate planning needs. Please feel free to contact us if you ever need us to draft any contracts or other documents required by your business.

Understanding the Purpose and Benefits of HB 4390

Texas and many other states have recently been passing new data breach protection laws to be sure that consumers receive timely notification after their most sensitive personal information has likely been breached or stolen. In June of 2019, HB 4390 was signed by Governor Greg Abbott. It became effective on January 1, 2020.

What HB 4390 is designed to accomplish – in general terms

Known as the Texas Privacy Protection Act, this legislation amends pertinent portions of the Texas Identity Theft Enforcement and Protection Act (“TITEPA”) set forth in the Texas Business & Commerce Code. In addition, the Texas Privacy Protection Act creates the Texas Privacy Protection Advisory Council that’s currently studying the data privacy laws of other states and countries.

HB 4390 requires this council to report its findings to the legislature by September 1, 2020 – so more comprehensive consumer privacy legislation can be considered during the next session of the Texas Legislature, beginning in January 2021.

New notification duties after suspected data breaches in the future

Now that the Texas Privacy Protection Act has gone into effect, the following new rules must be obeyed by all companies doing business in the state.

  • HB 4390 has added a new deadline. Consumers must be timely notified when there’s been a definite or suspected data breach (of sensitive personal information). This notification must be made within 60 days of the date when the apparent breach was discovered.
  • As amended by HB 4390, the TITEPA requires businesses to provide notice of certain types of data breaches to the Attorney General of Texas. More specifically, notice is mandatory when a breach has compromised the data of 250 or more Texas residents. This notice to the AG’s Office must also cover the following topics.
  1. The nature and circumstances of the breach must be described – and information must be provided about how the compromised data has been used (if known);
  2. There must be a statement about the number of Texas residents who were affected by the breach and when notifications were sent out;
  3. The reporting party must describe any measures taken to address the consequences of the breach;
  4. The AG’s Office must also be told whether any additional, corrective measures (regarding the suspected breach) are planned in the future; and
  5. There must be a statement about whether any law enforcement agency is currently involved in investigating the reported breach.

At present, at least 17 other states have established similar timeframes for reporting data breaches, usually between 30 to 90 days after the breach was discovered.

The Texas Privacy Protection Act also created the TX Privacy Protection Advisory Council

As was briefly noted above, this council will be meeting regularly until it tenders its required report to the Texas legislature by early September 2020. It’s hard to know if the group’s recommendations will be very comprehensive since some legal experts are concerned that Texas is rather hesitant to pass the full panoply of data breach protections that may be necessary. Far stronger measures were rejected – when HB 4390 and another bill were first proposed in Texas.

Better protection for victims of data breaches will likely be affected by the views of those currently sitting on this council. Here’s a look at the membership of this group.

  • Three of those who are on the council are members of the current Texas House of Representatives;
  • Three others are Texas senators;
  • Nine seats on the council were reserved for representatives of a wide number of industries including: consumer banking, technology, internet, medical profession, retail and electronic transactions, telecommunications, cloud data storage and social medial platforms;
  • Just two members of the Texas Privacy Protection Advisory Council are either members of a nonprofit organization that regularly evaluates data privacy issues from the viewpoint of consumers – or are professors at a Texas law school (or other higher educational institution) who have had important work published regarding data privacy.

Hopefully, most Texans will be pleased with the legislation that will eventually be passed based on this group’s recommendations.

Please feel free to contact one of our Murray Lobb attorneys if you have any additional questions about how this new legislation may affect your company either before or after you experience a data breach. We’re also available to address any of your other general business law needs — and we can readily draft the contracts and other legal documents you need to run your company each day.

Properly Handling Background Record Checks of Potential Employees

All companies must proceed cautiously while trying to create safe, productive and pleasant work environments. The best approach is to develop standard procedures for running background checks and investigations for all applicants who will be handling similar tasks — without regard to any discriminatory traits or characteristics.

First and foremost, you must obtain each job applicant’s written permission to run checks on their job and educational records, criminal background history and financial credit status. Should any of the information you obtain make you no longer wish to consider a specific job applicant, you must inform that person about each report’s negative findings – since all potential employees have the right to refute and correct such data.

Always be sure to also treat all applicants with equal respect and remind them that you’re simply trying to learn all you can about your top applicants. And be sure to state in writing that providing false information can cause individuals to be immediately dropped from further consideration – or be fired in the future when such misinformation is discovered.

Here’s additional information about the types of errors that can appear in background checks, how you might allow job candidates to respond to negative findings — and tips on exercising special caution when sensitive data appears on either sex offender registries or terror watch lists.

Types of negative information & errors that may be uncovered during background checks

Hopefully, most of your searches will just reveal that your applicants have provided their correct names, full address histories, all job information for recent years, accurate Social Security numbers and other basic data. However, chances are that at least some of your potential employees will need to explain about one or more of the following findings.

  • Past arrests or conviction records. Always pay close attention to the types of behavior or crimes involved, when the events occurred and how (if true) that history might affect your work environment. If you still wish to hire a person with some type of negative arrest or conviction, remember that you have a legal duty to create a safe work environment for all your employees. Also, bear in mind that future claims of negligent hiring could prove very costly to your company.
  • Fraudulent or grossly misleading information about the applicant’s academic background or work history. As noted above, make sure that all your application forms clearly indicate that providing false information on such forms (or on a resume) can be immediate grounds for dismissing an applicant from further consideration. Should you believe that any applicant may have simply made a typographical or innocent error on the forms, always allow the person to provide corrected information. Just be sure to respond to the discovery of such false information in the same manner for every applicant;
  • Misleading or inaccurate driving record information. If you’re hiring someone to deliver packages or goods for you – or drive others around on your company’s behalf, you better make sure they have an excellent driving record.
  • A very poor credit score, a bankruptcy or other signs of major financial problems. Always be sensitive and careful when asking applicants to explain this type of information;
  • The person’s name turns up on a sex offender registry or a terrorist watch list. Given the number of people who are burdened with very common names, always reveal what you’ve learned to the individual in a calm manner, preferably with at least one other human resources staff member present. If you still want to hire a person whose name was on one of these lists, always first speak with your Houston employment law attorney.

Your lawyer can tell you how you should go about carefully determining a person’s correct identity and if it’s too risky to hire someone. It may even be necessary to contact the Department of Homeland Security if the person is listed on a terrorist watch list. (Do keep in mind that even the government knows that it can be very time-consuming to remove a name wrongfully added to a terrorist watch list);

It’s crucial to maintain a standard of fairness that applies to all applicants

Be sure your company’s hiring policies provide specific time limits on when applicants must provide you with corrected information after background checks turn up negative or disturbing information. Always apply that same standard to all applicants. If someone needs more time, you should only allow a one-time extension that applies equally to others.

How long must you keep all job application forms and background check information?

The EEOC (Equal Opportunity Commission), the Department of Labor and the FTC (Federal Trade Commission) each provide slightly different guidelines on how long certain records should be kept. Overall, it’s a good idea to keep a copy of all application materials and background information for about two years. Of course, if any job applicant or employee files a lawsuit against your company, that person’s records should be kept until all legal proceedings and appeals have come to an end.

Make sure all employee records are stored in a restricted area where only one or two senior human resource officials have access to them. Once it’s time to destroy the records, it’s wise to carefully shred, burn or pulverize the data so that the material can no longer be read.

Of course, some employers keep all resumes and job application forms in case they later have problems with an employee — or come across information that indicates that the background check failed to disclose fraudulent claims were contained in those documents. Some firms just scan all such data into secure databases.

Since credit background checks are governed by the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA), be sure you understand the terms of that legislation and how it impacts your specific workplace. Also, always keep in mind that the State of Texas also has laws and regulations that can impact how your company handles background checks and employee records. It’s always wise to periodically touch base with your lawyer to find out if any of these laws have recently changed.

Please feel free to contact one of our Murray Lobb attorneys so we can provide you with the legal guidance you may need while hiring employees or simply running your business. We can also provide you with any contracts you may need — or review the contents of your current employee handbook.

Key Provisions of the FLSA Most Businesses Must Uphold

The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) is a federal law governing such employee issues as the minimum wage, overtime pay, child labor restrictions and record-keeping practices. It’s the duty of the Wage and Hour Division of the Department of Labor to administer this law.

The FLSA benefits exempt and nonexempt employees somewhat differently. For example, exempt employees do not have a federally guaranteed right to overtime pay — and minimum wage provisions usually don’t apply to them. Company executives and “outside sales” employees are among those who often hold exempt positions. Human resource personnel must fully understand the different rights that apply to these distinct classifications.

Here’s some additional information on jobs not usually covered by overtime pay, the wages owed to nonexempt employees, laws designed to safeguard children and basic ways that the DOL enforces violations of the Fair Labor Standards Act.

Workers or specific professions often exempt from overtime pay

  • Railroad and air carrier employees
  • Taxi drivers and some motor carrier workers
  • Those employed on American vessels at sea
  • Local delivery workers who are compensated under specific rate plans
  • News editors, announcers and chief engineers working for non-broadcasting stations
  • Farmworkers

Basic nonexempt employee wage rights

The current minimum wage in Texas is $7.25 an hour. However, waitstaff and other employees are governed by unique standards that are supposed to bring them up near (or equal to) the minimum wage. In addition to the wage rights set forth under the FLSA, state and municipal laws often provide somewhat higher minimum wages to nonexempt employees. Your Houston employment law attorney can update you on any recent changes in Texas law on this point.

Another important wage guarantee provided by the FLSA involves overtime pay. Nonexempt employees who work over 40 hours per week must be paid one and one-half times their regular pay rate for additional hours. Therefore, if a nonexempt employee normally earns $12 an hour – and is asked to work five extra hours one week – that employee must be paid $18 an hour for each of the additional five hours (in addition to the regular rate of pay for the 40 hours).

In some states, there are laws limiting how many hours a day a worker can be on duty. All employers must make sure they honor such provisions.

Federal job protections designed to benefit children

In most workplace settings, children must be age 16 or older to hold down a job – although they must be at least 18 years old to drive a motor vehicle for an employer – or to work in mining. However, exceptions have been made so that the FLSA does not apply to child actors, kids delivering newspapers or those making simple crafts at home.

Unfortunately, few restrictions protect children who’ve been hired as farm labor. Once a waiver has been obtained from the Department of Labor (DOL), a child as young as 10 or 11 can be hired to help with hand harvest labor.

There is also a “youth minimum wage” that applies to children (age 20 and younger) that’s equal to $4.25 an hour; it can be paid for 90 consecutive days of work. This makes summer jobs for teenagers easier to come by – although the pay isn’t very high. However, employers cannot displace any older workers receiving the standard minimum wage to simply save money by hiring teenagers at that lower pay rate.

The DOL’s Wage and Hour Division is charged with enforcing the FLSA

A complaint can be filed against businesses that violate any FLSA employee rights. While willful violations can be prosecuted in a criminal court, less serious or unintentional mishandling of FLSA duties may only result in civil liability. For example, if your office hires employees below the age of 16, you might be required to pay a fine of up to $1,000 for each underage young person on your payroll. A civil court might also impose specific changes in the way you handle certain hiring and record-keeping practices to prevent similar mistakes in the future.

Should the Wage and Hour Division decide that your company has failed to fully pay all that’s owed to specific workers, it can file suit against you to recover the unpaid sums of money — or obtain an injunction that will forbid any further violations of the FLSA.

If you’re uncertain whether your office is in full compliance with all FLSA regulations and all relevant Texas employment law statutes — please feel free to contact one of our Murray Lobb attorneys. We can help you review all your current practices involving the payment of a minimum wage, proper classification of all workers, the handling of overtime assignments and any other duties covered by the FLSA. A periodic review of all these workplace standards can help your business avoid any fines or lawsuits.

Be Careful When Creating a Company Policy on Moonlighting

When addressing employee management issues like moonlighting, it’s often best to seek out a middle ground. If you’ll first establish clear work standards that fully protect your company’s intellectual property and ongoing research and development efforts, you should be able to accommodate those who can responsibly handle a second job outside their regular work hours.

Perhaps the best way to create a balanced moonlighting policy is to first review your main concerns about allowing employees to do any outside work. You should then try to objectively embrace your employees’ reasons for wanting to take on another job. Although you do have greater freedom to dictate when exempt workers put in their hours, that’s not always the case when interacting with at-will employees who are paid hourly.

Here’s a look at the competing interests involved when trying to design a moonlighting policy for your unique workplace. That information is followed by some general guidelines that you’ll want to review with your Houston employment law attorney. Employees do have certain privacy rights about how they conduct their lives outside of work and those must be respected.

Legitimate reasons why employers often want to limit moonlighting

  • To protect the company’s intellectual property. No employer wants to worry about employees knowingly (or accidentally) sharing confidential, proprietary information with another employer – or using such information while starting their own companies. Non-disclosure agreements are crucial to protecting these types of rights;
  • To maintain control over employee schedules for valid staffing purposes. Many companies require employee flexibility with work schedules in order to cover the ongoing, often unpredictable nature of their work volume. For example, customer “help” or call centers often experience times of peak calling. However, these fluctuations can change from week to week – or even day to day. People hired to work in these environments can be legitimately required to forfeit or greatly limit outside work – if those unique requirements were clearly stated in writing prior to their hiring;
  • A desire to have employees provide the company with their very best efforts. When employees take on “second” jobs – they’ll often be tempted to put in too many total work hours each week. It’s completely legitimate to want every worker to show up on time each day, fully rested and able to adequately focus on their assigned tasks;
  • Safety concerns. Moonlighting frequently causes many people to lose sleep. When they show up to your workplace greatly fatigued, they can pose a serious safety threat to their own health – and that of their coworkers;
  • Loyalty and commitment. While a moonlighting employee can provide you with these desirable attribues – you have every right to expect them to demonstrate respect for your company while interacting with others.

Although these aren’t the only reasons you may want to carefully limit employee moonlighting – they do touch upon common concerns. Keep in mind that it’s your right to carefully monitor the quality of work of your moonlighting employees to be sure it doesn’t start to decline.

Some of the valid reasons many workers want to do some moonlighting

  • Additional money to support themselves and other family members. Regardless of what you’re paying each worker, everyone periodically encounters unexpected medical bills and other crises that require extra income;
  • A desire to realize their own entrepreneurial dreams. Few people can afford to simply quit their “day jobs” while trying to launch new businesses. If employees pursue this type of goal while using their own resources outside of regular work hours, there may be few issues. However, if their companies will cause them to compete for clients with your business, restrictions are fully justified;
  • An interest in taking on paid union work to improve conditions for themselves and others in their industry. Employers must tread lightly when trying to restrict such activities. While company loyalty is a legitimate concern, this isn’t necessarily violated if the workers are openly addressing key safety and health issues that affect all employees.

These are just a few of the many reasons why some workers are strongly motivated to take on moonlighting jobs.

General guidelines for drafting a moonlighting policy

  • Companies should rarely try to completely forbid moonlighting. However, as your Houston employment law attorney will tell you, it’s best to inform all “new hires” if their jobs may require sudden changes in their weekly schedules or limited overtime hours on short notice. Whenever possible, try to remain flexible with workers – or your best and brightest ones may leave so they can pursue moonlighting and other privileges elsewhere;
  • Decide if you need to specifically address this topic in your employee handbook. If you don’t wish to create a “moonlighting” policy, you can ask your attorney to provide you with hiring contracts (and/or) non-disclosure agreements. These will clearly explain to all employees that they’re legally forbidden to share any company trade secrets, research and development data – or other proprietary information – with outside parties without first obtaining express, written permission from your company. It’s also wise to have all employees sign non-compete contracts with your company before they start to work;
  • Consider requiring employees to obtain your permission before taking on “second” jobs.  Should you decide that you want to expressly forbid an employee from taking on a specific “moonlighting” job, always immediately speak with your attorney – to be sure you’re within your legal rights to do so. You’ll need to carefully document all your reasons to protect yourself from any future litigation;
  • Try to be accommodating when an employee indicates that s/he will not be competing with your company in any way. After all, it’s entirely possible that you may one day become a client of your employee’s fledgling new company. Of course, you should still periodically touch base with all moonlighting employees to be sure no conflicts of interest have developed since they started their second jobs;
  • Use periodic job evaluations to your advantage. During these, be sure supervisors ask questions that can help determine if the employee’s outside job is starting to compromise his/her ability to provide you with top-quality work.

Please feel free to schedule an appointment with one of our Murray Lobb attorneys so we can help you draft the various contracts you need to protect your company’s proprietary interests. We can also help guide you as you create (or update) your current employee handbook on this and other topics.

Key Ways to Protect Your Business Against Cybersecurity Threats

After the massive data breach involving Marriott’s Starwood hotel brands was reported in 2018, businesses of all sizes began wondering again if anyone can remain safe against hackers. About 500 million guests who stayed at Starwood properties (including Westin, Sheraton, W Hotels, and the St. Regis) had their names, phone numbers, email addresses, birth dates, encrypted credit card data and other information stolen.

What’s shocked people even more is that this breach covered a four-year time period extending from 2014 through September 2018. It’s hard to believe that any company’s computer networks could be so severely compromised over such a long period of time before being discovered.

Companies of all sizes who haven’t already done so must immediately take proactive steps to reduce their chances of having their customer data and other proprietary information suddenly stolen or compromised.

What one past study revealed about cybersecurity threats – that keep increasing annually

  • Close to half of the businesses surveyed consider themselves “very dependent” on the Internet for their daily business operations;
  • Over one-third of those interviewed said that it would be very damaging for their companies to be without Internet access for 48 hours in a row;
  • Small business employees rely on using the Internet for 75% to 100% of their daily work.

A much more recent study revealed that 58% of the victims of malware (cybersecurity) attacks are small businesses. Furthermore, cyber attacks wound up costing most targeted small companies about $2,235,000. Clearly, no one should avoid addressing this crucial issue.

Fortunately, various cybersecurity experts and business professionals are sharing their ideas about some of the best ways to prevent new attacks – as opposed to just responding to them.

You must determine your current level of risk to an attack before creating a protection plan

Even if you already have a highly qualified IT professional on your payroll, it’s often best to hire an outside cybersecurity consultant to come in and objectively assess your various levels of risk to a hacking attack. A “white-hat hacker” (someone on your side) can attempt to evaluate your code vulnerabilities and network and system weaknesses.

This expert can also evaluate how appropriately your employees are responding to suspicious emails that could easily introduce malware into your computer networks and databases. Give serious thought to having this type of outside expert audit your risk level at least once every two years – if not annually.

Keep in mind that it’s often useful to assign a risk level of low, medium or high to each system that might be compromised by a data breach. This can help you as you design a cybersecurity protection plan that prioritizes various risks.

Regularly review the FINRA cybersecurity checklist if you’re a smaller firm or business

This source is designed to help companies handle the following tasks.

  • Identify and evaluate all current cybersecurity threats to better protect all business assets against outside intrusions (or in-house security lapses);
  • Readily determine when your company software or databases have been hacked or compromised;
  • Decide (in advance) how to quickly counter attacks or threats as soon as they’re detected. It’s always wise to create several options based on the type of information or software that may be under attack;
  • Develop a plan with any in-house IT professionals and your outside cybersecurity consultant for readily recovering any company assets that are lost, stolen or otherwise compromised.

Create an employee training program that will help protect your systems and networks

Your employees must take the ongoing threat of a cyberattack very seriously. Staff members who fail to follow all in-house cybersecurity protocol often make it easier for outside hackers to gain entry. You might consider requiring a two-factor authentication password for those seeking to gain access to some of your company’s most valuable or vulnerable accounts.

Before providing this training, you must decide which parts of your computer network, systems and databases should remain off limits to various levels of employees.

It’s also important to let your employees know if you’ll be regularly monitoring their usage of all company computers. (It’s best to obtain written permission for this practice at the time you initially hire all employees). Inform everyone that each employee’s access to information will probably be restricted — based on their normal daily need to access certain information or to complete their assigned tasks.

Give very serious thought to limiting the outside Internet websites that employees can visit while at work and indicate what types of data downloads from outside sources are forbidden. Including these restrictions in your company’s formal training and cybersecurity protocol can help decrease the chances of anyone downloading threatening malware or viruses.

Always ask everyone to encrypt their attempts to access various company databases and accounts. You should also encrypt access to all email accounts. Finally, be sure all employees know the safest ways to file and store data, so it can be fully protected from hackers, while remaining easy to access again when needed.

Develop a comprehensive plan for offboarding employees (those leaving your company)

Regardless of whether someone is being fired or has accepted a new job elsewhere, you need to have a systematic way of reclaiming company property when workers leave. You must also revoke their access to all business networks. Be sure all exiting employees return all company laptops, ID badges, company credit cards, mobile devices and other equipment.

Finally, delete the email addresses of exiting employees as soon as they leave. Someone should also change the company passwords they regularly used that were not encrypted. And always try to make sure every employee has signed an appropriate NDAs (non-disclosure agreements).

Although not intended to be comprehensive, we hope this list of suggestions will help your company gain greater protection against future cybersecurity attacks.

Please feel free to contact one of our Murray Lobb attorneys about how various Texas and federal cybersecurity laws and regulations may impact your company. We can also provide you with a non-disclosure agreement for exiting employees to sign and review the terms and legal limitations of any cybersecurity insurance policy that you may be looking at in hopes of limiting your business liability for future data breaches.

Obtaining an SBA Loan for Your Company

Although the SBA (Small Business Administration) doesn’t directly lend money to owners of small companies, it does create loan guidelines for general lenders, community development organizations and micro-lending institutions that partner with it. The SBA helps reduce the risks for these lenders as they select the most qualified small businesses seeking help.

SBA-guaranteed loans are designed to offer competitive fees and rates and applicants are usually offered helpful counseling during the application process.

You’ll know when you’ve found the best loan offer since it will provide you with one or more of the following benefits.

  • The need for little or no collateral
  • Flexible overhead requirements
  • Lower down payments

Although the stated reasons for securing a loan can vary, many companies seek loans to help them secure long-term fixed assets and basic funds to run their businesses. However, under certain circumstances, the amount you can borrow may be restricted based on how your company intends to use the money.

SBA loan funds are often sought for the following types of working capital and fixed assets

  • Revolving credit
  • Seasonal financing
  • Export loans
  • The refinancing of current business debt
  • Machinery
  • Real estate
  • Construction
  • Equipment
  • Remodeling

What types of eligibility requirements must be met to obtain a loan?

Lenders often first inquire about the parties holding ownership interests in the company, how it generates income and where it conducts business. They also inquire about the basic size of your business – based on the company’s number of employees, average annual receipts and other factors.

Of course, your ability to repay the loan is of keen interest to lenders, along with having a very secure business purpose. While a strong credit rating is highly desirable for obtaining loans, if you’re running a new company, certain start-up funds may still be made available to you.

Keep in mind that all lenders are entitled to establish their own, supplemental eligibility requirements for making an SBA-guaranteed loan – and they’re also entitled to ask about the following information.

  • If your company is properly registered and currently eligible to do business;
  • Whether your business is currently operating in the United States or one or more of its territories;
  • If you can easily document the time and money each business partner has already invested in the company;
  • If you can provide evidence of any recent, unsuccessful efforts to secure a non-SBA loan.

Can small companies operating as exporters of goods obtain loans from the SBA?

The SBA does try to help such companies. However, you’ll need to usually start your search for a possible lender by first contacting an SBA International Trade Specialist or the group’s Office of International Trade. Exporters often need help securing additional funds to cover their daily operating expenses, placing advance orders with suppliers and debt refinancing.

How should my company go about looking for a specific SBA-affiliated lender?

You’ll first need to spend five to ten minutes answering questions on the SBA website concerning your company’s present needs. You should then receive an email matching you to one or more interested lenders. It is then up to you to contact each potential lender to discuss possible rates, fees and other factors involved with structuring a loan. You’ll then need to submit applications and wait to receive responses.

If you do not receive any offers that you believe are favorable or viable, you can ask to speak to an SBA counselor again to see if there’s a better way for your company to try and secure the type of loan you need.

Please feel free to contact one of our Murray Lobb attorneys so we can provide you with further advice about obtaining business loans through SBA programs, private banks — or other reputable sources.

Many People Start New Businesses After Age 50

A large percentage of Americans launch new companies and careers after turning fifty. In fact, the term “encore entrepreneurs” has been coined to describe this steady trend. In her book, “Your Life Calling: Reimagining the Rest of Your Life,” Jane Pauley profiles some rather amazing people who’ve transformed their “retirement years.” Many of them are now realizing personal dreams that are helping others both locally and in distant parts of the world.

In a recent New York Times article addressing this topic, one man in his early sixties said that he’s so happy with his new company (which creates educational and training videos) that he may never retire. Fortunately, many larger cities often have “incubators” designed to help people get new companies off the ground — and venture capitalists who are eager to consider funding start-ups with a strong likelihood of success.

Texas remains a great state for new businesses

Every year, many media outlets rank multiple Texas cities as great places to design and build new companies. Be sure to review our Texas governor’s office publication entitled “Texas Business Incubators.”

Once you’ve got a great idea for starting a business, consider scheduling an appointment with your experienced Houston business law attorney to obtain the valuable legal advice you’ll need.

Here are some additional facts and figures that can provide useful insights into some of the best fields to enter (and others to avoid) as you move forward with getting your new company up and running.

Facts and statistics about older Americans starting new companies & becoming self-employed

  • Fifty-one percent (51%) of new start-up business owners are between the ages of 50 and 88. In fact, those aged 35-49 only start about 33% of new companies — and those age 35 or younger only form about 16% of them. Fortunately, you don’t often need a lot of money to get a new company off the ground. Many older entrepreneurs start their companies with $2,000 or less.
  • The Dallas Morning News reports that during each month in 2017, roughly 400 out of every 100,000 Texans became entrepreneurs. A large percentage of those individuals were seniors. Many of their businesses were formed in Austin, Dallas and Houston.
  • About 80% of new Texas business entrepreneurs start their businesses based upon immediately available opportunities – rather than the simple need to find work.
  • Between the year 2000 and 2016, the number of self-employed New Yorkers rose by 63.7 percent. While the country’s economic downturn back around 2008 certainly influenced that trend, it clearly isn’t the sole or main force behind it.
  • About 69% of Americans start their businesses at home.
  • Roughly 42% of all new businesses are formed as S-corporations and 23% are LLCs. Of course, a very large number of small businesses are simply run by solo entrepreneurs.

Which types of new businesses tend to succeed the most often?

  • Those offering insurance, real estate or financial services. After four years, about 58% of these are usually still viable.  Businesses in the financial realm often offer tax preparation, bookkeeping or payroll services.
  • Companies renting or leasing automotive equipment.
  • Legal service businesses.
  • Medical, dental and other healthcare services.
  • Religious organizations.
  • Specific types of administrative or company management services.

Types of new businesses that frequently fail sooner than others

  • Stores selling beer, wine and liquor
  • Auto dealerships
  • Oil and gas extraction service companies
  • Grocery stores
  • Beverage manufacturers
  • Furniture stores
  • Companies selling lawn and garden equipment

After going over your business plans with trusted family members or friends, consider reading more about the different types of business structures you can choose from and what’s normally involved with starting a new Texas company.

Hopefully, you’ll decide to join the many other Texans who’ve discovered that running a business when you’re older can be a very gratifying experience – one that can add even greater purpose to your life.

Our law firm invites adults of every age to contact one of our Murray Lobb attorneys for legal advice when either starting a new business – or simply needed help with one that’s already thriving.

General Steps to Take While Preparing to Sell Your Business

Selling your company at the proper time can provide you with greater freedom and added income as you pursue other business or personal goals. Whether you’re a sole proprietor who can move forward alone — or someone who must confer with business partners or a corporate board of directors, there are basic steps you can follow that can help streamline the process.

As you further contemplate this move, give serious thought to timing and be ready to explain why you’re making specific choices to prospective buyers; They’re sure to ask why you’re selling your company now. Also think about whether you should hire a professional business broker, especially if you don’t want to manage the sale on your own and are concerned about locating the best potential buyers.

Each of these key topics are discussed further below.

Are you prepared to tell qualified buyers why you want to sell your business now?

If sales are dropping or you’re currently losing a sizable portion of your customer base, you may want to postpone the sale for six months or a year. During that time, you may be able to rebuild the company and make it more viable.

Of course, business owners often want to sell their companies for many other reasons, including the following ones.

  • They’re eager to retire and simplify their lives – letting go of business activities.
  • They have current disputes with partners, co-owners or corporate board members, so they would just like to move on. Obviously, you’ll need to reference these issues in a very tactful yet honest manner if you have no other reasons for selling.
  • The sole owner (or another party) is facing a serious illness or impending death.
  • You want to keep working — but in a less stressful capacity. Be ready to share this in as upbeat a manner as possible – while being open and honest about the pressures of running the business.
  • You’ve developed a keen interest in a different business field and are eager to get your new venture up and running.

These are just a few of the reasons why people often choose to sell a business. Whatever you decide to tell prospective buyers – be as honest as possible since a failure to disclose current problems is unethical and could damage your reputation in the community.

If your business is losing value, be prepared to tell potential buyers (after carefully qualifying them) how they might reverse that trend. You can also explain why they may still want to simply purchase all your valuable vehicles and equipment.

Decide whether you should sell the business yourself – or hire other professionals

  • Legal advice can prove crucial. You’ll also need help drafting the various legal contracts and documents required to support a sale.
  • You’ll want to work closely with your accountant. All your business and tax records must be fully updated.
  • A business appraiser can prove very helpful. This individual can help you determine a fair asking price for your company.
  • Even a brief consultation with a business broker can benefit you. This person knows how to locate a healthy pool of potential buyers. This process can prove extra challenging if you do not want to run any public advertisements.

Be prepared to locate or create various documents while trying to complete a viable sale

You must be prepared to share all your basic financial statements and records for the past three or four years. It’s also crucial to create a comprehensive list of all your company equipment and fixed assets tied to your business accounts. (Be prepared to spend the necessary fees to repair all valuable vehicles, equipment and other goods involved with the final sale).

It’s also important to create a detailed list of your ongoing sales transactions and the names of the companies that currently provide all your company’s most critical supplies. Copies of all current contracts and leases should also be made available so qualified buyers can review them.

Be prepared to carefully decide which buyers may be the most dependable ones

Many business owners prefer to sell their companies to close family members, trustworthy employees, friends or current customers. You’ll need to choose wisely, especially since this type of sale often takes from six months to two years. 

Of course, never disclose private information about your business to potential buyers until after they’ve each agreed to sign non-disclosure agreements and qualified for financing plans that meet your requirements.  Be prepared to negotiate carefully – or ask your attorney to handle the negotiations on your behalf.

If you’re ready to sell a business – or just want to learn more about all the various legal and practical steps referenced above, please contact one of our Murray Lobb attorneys. We look forward to answering all your questions.

The Basic Steps for Forming a Texas Corporation

Although running a business can be very challenging, it’s often invigorating to reach a point when you may need to incorporate your company. This process is often begun by discussing what can be gained or loss by making this move with your business partners. You should also consider speaking with your Houston business lawyer so you’ll fully understand all the legal implications of making this decision.

The following material reviews the main reasons that many companies choose to incorporate their businesses. It then notes the most common steps that must be taken prior to filing a certificate of incorporation with the Texas Secretary of State’s Office.

Potential advantages that are often acquired by incorporating a business

  • Improved legal liability status. Creating a corporation can provide each individual business partner with added protection against personal liability for the actions of all other executives or employees. It can also offer greater protection for business assets;
  • Critical, everyday activities can be simplified. Upon incorporating, it can become easier to add new owners and investors while still maintaining the same level of control over your company;
  • The company can more easily transact business all around the world. It’s often easier to conduct business in a corporate form in many other countries;
  • It can help you one day take your company public. While your corporate executives and employees may always want to conduct business privately, a time may come when it may be to your financial advantage to take the company public and sell stock.

Those are just a few of the main reasons why many business executives decide to incorporate their current companies or partnerships.

Common steps you must take when you’re ready to incorporate your business

  1. Name the corporation. Try to choose a name that suits your business and helps raise your profile. You and your lawyer will need to conduct a formal search to see if any of the names you’d like to choose are currently available in Texas;
  2. Select a registered agent and office. Be prepared to designate a trustworthy party to serve as your registered agent and name the city where that person will keep his or her office;
  3. Choose which parties will be named as the corporation’s organizers or incorporators. The names and addresses of each of these individuals must be listed within the certificate of formation;
  4. Designate your corporate directors. After the certificate of formation has been filed, the directors take over running your business. These highly knowledgeable executives must also have strong management and interpersonal skills that will help them successfully negotiate all future decisions and transactions;
  5. Draft a brief statement, indicating the corporation’s official business purpose. While this may sound rather straightforward, it’s often wise to run this description by your lawyer to be sure you’ve fully covered all key aspects of your intended business transactions;
  6. Consider obtaining professional help with the completion of your official certificate of incorporation. Like other states, Texas has specific expectations for the precise information that must be included. Since these requirements can change periodically, it’s often wise to ask your lawyer to review the contents of your certificate of incorporation;
  7. Pay the required fees. These should normally be posted on the Texas Secretary of State’s online website. If you prefer, your lawyer can submit your fees and certificate of incorporation for you.

While this list of common steps isn’t intended to be fully comprehensive, it should clearly indicate the basic steps that you and your business partners should take if you decide that it’s time to incorporate your business.

Please feel free to contact the lawyers at Murray Lobb so we can answer any specific questions you may have about this process. We’ve helped many clients incorporate their businesses over the years – and we’re ready to put that experience to work for you.