Six Basic Types of Business Insurance You Might Need

Successful companies of all sizes readily address their insurance needs so they won’t later be caught off guard by either a baseless or valid legal claim. No matter how hard you try to provide flawless products and services to the public, there’s always a chance that a defective product or business transaction may render you liable for legal damages.

Although only certain types of companies must carry workers compensation, disability and unemployment insurance to meet federal guidelines, all businesses can benefit from protecting their company assets by purchasing basic and special types of business insurance.

Fortunately, there are only six basic types of business insurance that you and your business partners must carefully review while trying to protect your company against future legal challenges. All six are set forth below with additional information.

Six common types of business insurance

Before reviewing the following types of insurance, be sure to thoroughly discuss the precise nature of all your business transactions with your insurance agent.

  1. General liability insurance. This will provide you with legal defense support for a variety of alleged wrongs. For example, your company may be sued based on a personal injury claim or the alleged statements of one of your employees. For example, if one of your customers is seriously injured while visiting one of your offices or factories, this policy can help you compensate the injured party for all bodily injuries and medical expenses. In addition, this same type of policy could protect you if a court holds one of your employees liable for business libel or slander — for damages up to the maximum amount of coverage stated in your policy.
  2. Product liability insurance. Even some of the most reliable products on the market will occasionally malfunction and harm a consumer. For this reason, you must secure an ample amount of product liability insurance coverage for this type of claim.
  3. Professional liability insurance. If your company provides any types of services to customers, you must carry this type of policy – often referred to as “E and O” (errors and omissions) coverage. This policy will cover the costs of defending your company in a civil lawsuit that may be based on the alleged grounds of malpractice (often medical or legal). The insurance industry doesn’t view these types of claims as eligible for coverage under either general liability insurance or a homeowner’s insurance policy.
  4. Commercial property insurance. Industrial fires, floods, windy hail storms and other natural disasters can quickly destroy critical manufacturing plants, office buildings and valuable inventory. Always be sure to carry ample coverage under this type of policy — based on recent property value appraisals.
  5. Home-based business insurance. This type of policy is usually offered as a rider to a person’s homeowner’s insurance. It provides limited coverage for such problems as business equipment and inventory damages. This type of policy can also provide funds to cover liability claims brought by injured third parties.
  6. A business owner’s policy. This general type of coverage can let you bundle nearly all (or most) of your insurance needs into one policy. If you pursue this option alone – make sure it adequately protects you regarding all the most unique aspects of your company’s goods and services.

When discussing your insurance needs with your lawyer and insurance agent

Always talk about every reasonable type of harm that your business might suffer. Also, make sure you’ve chosen the best type of partnership or corporate structure to further protect your personal and business assets. Once you fully understand all the risks your company might face, find a highly respected business insurance broker. Always ask trusted business peers for their recommendations for this type of agent.

Finally, speak with your Houston business law attorney about all the specific types of insurance required by the state of Texas for a company like yours. And be sure to address all the federal government’s insurance requirements. Keep in touch with your insurance agent and lawyer throughout each year so they can each readily update you about new legal or policy requirements that may affect your current coverage during the upcoming year.

Please feel free to contact a Murray Lobb lawyer so we can talk with you about the legal aspects of obtaining adequate insurance coverage for all your business needs.

An Overview:  Winding Up Texas Corporate Activities

An Overview:  Winding Up Texas Corporate Activities

Corporate officers can choose to formally “wind-up” all business activities when many different factors change. For example, when smaller corporations are involved, key parties may simply want to retire or pursue new goals. In other situations, market trends may change so significantly that corporate officers may want to choose more advantageous business structures. Regardless of why any specific Texas corporation decides to go through the termination process, basic legal steps must be followed carefully.

Since this process can involve different statutes, including detailed sections of the state’s Business Organizations Code, it’s always best to confer with your Houston corporate law attorneys. They’ll readily understand the termination process that the Texas Secretary of State’s Office expects each corporation to complete. (Of course, in some instances, a corporation may be involuntarily terminated for various reasons – including the failure to file annual reports).

Here’s a look at some of the steps you must be ready to take based on our state’s governing laws and the specific realities involved with your business. Although other states may speak of “dissolving” corporations, Texas usually refers to “winding up” corporate matters.

The Texas Business Organization Code’s Two Main Ways to “Wind Up” Activities

  1. The board of directors adopts a resolution. It should state that they are recommending that the corporation “wind up” its activities — after submitting this proposal to all the shareholders. At a properly convened meeting, the shareholders must then vote on this proposal. In general, a two-thirds majority of the shareholders must approve this decision before the winding-up process can begin;
  2. All shareholders must sign a “consent” document. Once this has been done, the “consent” document must be entered into the corporate records. This approach is most common when smaller corporations are involved. Great care must be taken to cover all key termination matters within this consent agreement.

Once this early internal activity has been concluded, numerous other steps must be taken to properly conclude all corporate business matters.

Common Additional Steps Required to “Wind Up” Your Corporation

  • All known parties with claims against the corporation must be served with notice of the current intent to terminate the corporation’s existence;
  • Every necessary corporate lawsuit must be properly initiated and concluded;
  • All corporate property must be properly collected and sold – depending on whether its value is owed in some manner to the shareholders;
  • All corporate liabilities must be properly discharged – including the payment of any taxes owed to the IRS or the state of Texas.

General Tax Issues and Obtaining Required Certificates

While your Texas corporate attorney may be prepared to handle all your corporation’s tax payment issues involved with the “winding up” process, you may also want to confer with a tax attorney.

Keep in mind that your corporation must obtain a “certificate of account status” from the Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts — and a final federal tax return must be properly filed once all corporate finances have been finalized.

Filing a Certificate of Termination

After you’ve obtained a certificate of account status from the Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts, you’ll need to file Form 651 (a certificate of termination) with the Secretary of State’s Office. Once this step has been taken and approved, your corporation’s existence has legally ended.

Added Issues That May Need to Be Addressed

Keep in mind that the information provided above was simply intended as an overview of the Texas corporate “winding up” process. Your attorney will be able to provide you further advice about whether additional paperwork is required. Fox example, certain Texas laws governing corporate mergers may or may not apply to your situation.

Please feel free to contact our law office with any questions you may have about possibly terminating your Texas corporation – or any other business entity. We can provide you with the advice you’ll need to properly handle all required stages of this process.

Everyone Should Benefit When an Employee Is Properly Fired

While most people don’t enjoy being fired from a job, everyone can benefit if the process is handled properly. To understand how this result is possible, it’s important to remember that your employees must be able to work together as a team. When one member is completely out of sync with the others or simply cannot do the assigned work in a timely manner, everyone suffers. So, once you’ve efficiently moved through the firing stages, most staff members will finally get the chance to perform at their highest level again.

The following information provides a brief overview of important goals to keep in mind when firing an employee. It also provides tips for protecting your company from wrongful termination lawsuits and describes the best way to meet with people while firing them.

How to Display Good Character and Protect the Business from Lawsuits

  • Be sure to clearly explain all employee management and firing guidelines in an employee handbook. Always hand one of these out to all new-hires on their first day at work and have them sign a simple form noting that they’ve received the booklet and will carefully review it right away. It’s even better to gather together “new hires” within a week or two of their starting at your company and covering basic information in the handbook;
  • Carefully investigate all the facts involved with possibly firing a specific employee. Also, make sure all supervisors are regularly interacting with each employee and telling them when their performance needs improvement – in writing (be sure to have the employee sign and date this form before placing it in a permanent file);
  • Review all applicable state and federal laws regarding termination. If necessary, speak with your attorney if you have any major questions – or believe the employee is likely to sue. Always remember that some employees are very sensitive to issues involving race, gender, ethnicity, religion, nationality, veteran status, disability, age and sexual orientation;
  • Gather together all pertinent, written evidence concerning the employee’s work record. Be prepared to keep this file in a very safe place in case a lawsuit is later filed. While doing this, rethink all the hiring practices that may need to be revised so you can avoid hiring a similar person in the future;
  • Treat the employee with dignity and respect. Don’t gossip about your firing plans. Meet with the employee in a private office setting with at least one other staff member present to serve as a witness. Respect the fact that the process of being fired may be hard on the individual. Unless the employee is guilty of terrible misconduct, remain open to paying a later unemployment insurance claim. Consider offering a severance package in exchange for the employee signing a waiver not to sue for wrongful termination. Be polite yet firm when simply stating the reasons for your decision. Finally, let the individual speak briefly about how they feel about the event. And be sure to pay all monies owed for accrued sick leave and vacation time;
  • Know that you may face sociological repercussions among other workers after the firing. If what you have done in firing a specific person is considered unfair, you may have a problem regaining the respect of many co-workers and superiors. It’s always wise to meet briefly with all concerned employees and simply state that the individual is no longer with the company and that you would prefer to not discuss it further for privacy reasons;
  • Be sure to retrieve all company property prior to providing a last check to the fired employee. You’ll also want to ask for the company laptop and any keys to office property. Be sure to immediately notify your computer and building security forces so they can block the employee’s future access to the company database and email system.  You’ll also need to collect all company I.D. cards and uniforms.

Finally, try to part on pleasant terms with outgoing employees, perhaps noting that you believe that they’ll find a better fit in other positions soon. Everyone really can benefit from a properly handled firing since it can eventually improve workplace morale. In fact, even the fired employee may soon find an equal or better position somewhere else.

Be sure to call our firm if you need any specific advice about preparing an employee handbook, interacting with troublesome staff members — or any other employment law issue.