Estate Planning: Becoming a Texas Organ and Tissue Donor

If you’ve ever known someone waiting to receive an organ, you know how stressful the process can be. Most of those requesting help are either fighting to save their lives or to greatly improve their health. Fortunately, there’s a national transplant waiting list that’s been set up to match donors and recipients in Texas and all other states.

Since many people want to help with this critical need, they often ask their lawyers how they can become donors. This article will describe what you should do — besides simply indicating this desire on your Texas driver’s license.

A few statistics are set forth below to help those trying to decide if they’re ready to help others in this way, followed a description of the other steps you should take to be sure your decision to become a donor is faithfully honored in the future.

How many people’s lives are at stake annually due to the need for organ donation?

  • About 20 Americans die each day due to the lack of available organs
  • Since 1988, about 700,000 transplants have been performed in this country
  • Nearly every 10 minutes, a new name is added to the donor recipient list
  • It only takes one donor to save as many as eight lives. In fact, one donor can improve the quality of life for over 100 individuals – just by making extensive tissue donations
  • The most commonly transplanted tissue is the cornea of the eye
  • Roughly 6,000 living donations are made each year. And one-fourth of the donors are not family members or biologically related to the person in need.
  • About 1 in every 26 Americans has a kidney disease without knowing it – that equals about twenty-six million people who might one day require a transplant.

Living donors are also needed. Healthy people can donate part (or all) of a kidney, liver, intestine or lung. Sick patients are also in need of bone marrow and blood from healthy donors.

How do most Texans handle this decision to donate tissue or organs?

States like Texas have tried to simplify this process by allowing those wishing to donate their organs or tissues (in the future) to indicate that on their Texas driver licenses. Residents of the state can also have their Houston estate planning attorney directly state this commitment in their Medical Power of Attorney or Advance Directive. This latter approach can help remove the anxiety from the shoulders of family members once this information has been legally documented in this manner.

The third way people can indicate their desire to be organ donors is to directly sign up with DonateLifeTexas.org . You can learn more about this process by watching the following video created by DonateLifeTexas.org .

Please feel free to contact any of our Murray Lobb attorneys so we can meet all your business and estate planning needs. We look forward to sharing our legal skills and advice with you.

Key Estate Planning Advice for the Terminally Ill

Nearly everyone expects to live to their full life expectancy. However, as we grow older, we begin to see many friends and loved ones die early due to cancer, heart disease or various tragic, unexpected events. For this reason, every adult should create an estate plan and remain ready to modify it once a terminal illness or tragedy suddenly unfolds.

After all, our family members, friends and favorite charities depend on us to maximize the gifts we make through our Wills, trusts and other testamentary devices.

To get ready for this process, you should first make a list of all your current assets (and their values) and then schedule an appointment with your Houston estate planning attorney. When you meet, your lawyer can explain the choices you’ll need to make that can simplify the process, while also decreasing the tax burdens on your heirs and other beneficiaries.

Here’s a look at some of the ways that terminally ill people – or those aware that the end of life is fast approaching – can adjust their estate plans to maximize the final gifts they can give to all those they wish to help.

Specific steps for the terminally ill to consider while updating or creating an estate plan

  • Decide if you should set up a revocable trust. This can help greatly reduce all the tasks the appointed executor must handle — and can lessen the chances that any of your estate will have to pass through the probate process.
  • If you’re a parent or grandparent, consider creating a private annuity. This will allow you to transfer substantial assets to your loved ones while retaining a lifetime annuity. If you do not live to your expected lifetime expectancy, as set forth in actuarial tables maintained by the IRS, most (or all) of your assets may not be taxed.
  • Make sure you’ve fully used up all your current annual exclusions. As many taxpayers know, every American has the right to give $12,000 a year to multiple donees. And if your spouse agrees to all the gifts you’d like to make during the current tax year, you could give away a total of $288,000 — tax free. It’s also possible that other “leveraging” techniques involving family partnerships could greatly increase that amount.
  • Check to see if all your assets are titled properly (so your beneficiaries will reap the best tax benefits). Your lawyer can explain how this can help you obtain the full lifetime exemption from estate taxes. In some cases, it may be best if many assets (including the highly appreciated ones) are held in the name of the terminally ill spouse. When this is allowed, it can help minimize all the capital gain taxes that might otherwise accrue when various assets are sold after the terminally ill person passes away.
  • Review all the assets held in your 401k and other retirement accounts. This can also help you recall what you’ve already bequeathed to various beneficiaries. Be sure to bring all the updated information about these accounts to the meeting.
  • Create an update list of all named beneficiaries and their current addresses. Everyone will appreciate being able to receive your gifts as quickly as possible.
  • Consider placing a certain amount of cash in your checking or savings account so that your executor can easily pay your final expenses using that money.

If you’re the terminally ill patient, seriously consider asking your spouse, executor, other trusted family member or close friend to take part in this meeting with your attorney. This can help you avoid forgetting important assets and beneficiaries. It can also remind you to tell this trusted person where you currently keep all your real estate deeds, the passbooks for all your investment and saving accounts — and all your online account usernames and passwords.

While the information above isn’t intended to be fully comprehensive, it should provide you with an accurate idea of the types of matters you and your lawyer can handle during your upcoming appointment.

Finally, please be aware that your attorney may be able to arrange an initial, teleconferencing appointment if that will work best due to your serious illness. Finalized paperwork can then be signed within a short timeframe.

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Please feel free to contact your Murray Lobb attorneys for help with any of your estate planning or general business needs. We try to remain available to provide you with prompt legal advice and the various contracts and other documents that help keep your business running.

Inter Vivos Gifts: Transferring Property or Wealth While You’re Still Alive

Stated simply, inter vivos gifts are those given by a donor to a beneficiary during the donor’s lifetime. Many families and individuals enjoy passing property or wealth on to loved ones, friends or charities in this manner. The term “inter vivos” is a Latin one that can be translated as “between living people.”

One of the chief reasons a donor makes this kind of gift is to help a beneficiary avoid paying unnecessary probate taxes after the donor passes away. Another motivation is to give the donor the personal pleasure of seeing the beneficiary enjoy the gift or funds. While other reasons may exist, those are among the most common ones.

The following material reviews some key legal terms you’ll want to know while working with your Houston estate planning attorney. There’s also a list of key factors required for a valid transfer of an inter vivos gift.

Legal terms often used when conveying wealth or property as inter vivos gifts 

  • Donor/grantor. Both these terms are used to describe the person making the inter vivos gift;
  • Beneficiary. The party designated as the recipient of the funds or property;
  • Settlor.  This term is often just used to refer to someone who creates a trust;
  • Advancement. When making a formal inter vivos gift, you should tell your lawyer if you want to treat a gift as an “advancement” against future gifts you’ve already designated for a beneficiary in your estate plan. That will mean that the value of the current gift will reduce the size or value of your later bequest to the specific beneficiary.  You can also just state that you do not want your current, inter vivos gift treated as an advancement against what you’ve designated for a person or group in your estate plan; 
  • Capital gains taxes. Keep in mind the tax consequences that can occur if you currently give someone an inter vivos gift like stock shares. For example, if you give someone an inter vivos gift of stock shares that originally cost you less than $3,000 – but are now worth over $10,000 — your beneficiary will likely have to pay a capital gains tax on that gift. To prevent this burden from being passed on to a beneficiary, you may just want to give the person cash to buy stock shares — or anything else they prefer;
  • Gift taxes. At present, every beneficiary who receives an inter vivos gift worth more than $15,000 must pay a gift tax on the amount to the IRS. Therefore, most people who give these gifts keep them under $15,000 for each recipient. You’ll need to ask your attorney what the limits are on the size of the inter vivos gifts that spouses may want to give each other.

Choosing to create a trust when transferring wealth as an inter vivos gift

Some grantors may not want to make direct cash or property gifts. Instead, they make want to make this type of gift by creating either a revocable or irrevocable trust. As may now be clear, these types of trusts take effect while the settlor is still alive. In contrast, testamentary trusts don’t take effect until the settlor dies.

Here’s additional information about both revocable and irrevocable inter vivos trusts.

  • The revocable inter vivos trust. This can go into effect (or become operative) during the settlor’s own lifetime. This type of trust can also be referred to as a living trust – one that is drafted so that it won’t have to go through the probate process;
  • The irrevocable inter vivos trust. This type of conveyance is designed to go into effect while the settlor is still alive. However, it cannot be revoked after the settlor has finalized it. People normally use this type of trust to help reduce the beneficiary’s potential tax debt.

Key information about making inter vivos gifts to minors

Since minors cannot receive large gifts of money or property directly, inter vivos gifts made to them require the use of a trust. A party must be named as the guardian of the trust to manage its contents (under court supervision) on behalf of the child – until s/he reaches the age of majority.

Conditions that must be met for a valid inter vivos gift to be made

  • The donor must have capacity. As a donor, you must be at least 18 years old when you make this type of gift;
  • The donor must have the proper intent. This requirement usually means that the donor intends for the gift to be transferred during his/her lifetime;
  • Receipt of the gift by the beneficiary. You must arrange a reliable form of delivery to the beneficiary. This means the donor/grantor (or settlor) will then no longer have control over the funds or other property;
  • Acceptance. The beneficiary must accept the gift. While most of us would readily accept an inter vivos from someone else – that’s not going to be true of everyone. In some cases, high taxes might be due on the gift — or the recipient may simply not want to accept any gift from the grantor or settlor.

Please feel free to contact one of our Murray Lobb attorneys with any questions you may have about making legal gifts to others for current delivery – or to be received later as part of your personal estate plan.

How Texas Estates Are Often Handled When Wills Cannot Be Found

Given how hard most people work to pay their bills and save up for their retirement years, you would think all of us would want to maintain strict control over who will inherit from us. Yet statistics reveal that only about forty percent (40%) of Americans have faced their mortality and asked their lawyers to help them create Wills.

When we make this error, we increase the chances that relatives we don’t know very well – or perhaps even like – may one day receive all our wealth. That’s regrettable since most of us have specific family members who would benefit the most from an inheritance. And great charities and faith-related beneficiaries can always use our funds to bless many others.

Hopefully, this article will help you see the advantages of meeting with your Houston estate planning attorney to create a first Will — and then later update it as your estate grows.

What are the five ways Texas wealth is often distributed when there is no Will?

  1. Under the state’s intestate succession laws. While these are useful, they do not let you determine who will inherit from you. Furthermore, if you own any of the following types of accounts or property, you must make sure that you’ve provided an updated list of beneficiaries to those who maintain these accounts (or other forms of wealth) on your behalf.
  1. Proceeds from a life insurance policy
  2. Retirement account funds that may include a 401k, IRA — or another, similar type of account
  3. Property that you and another person own together
  4. POD or payable-on-death account funds
  5. Property that’s already held in some type of living trust
  1. Through the filing of an Affidavit of Heirship. This approach can normally only be used when the assets requiring a title transfer are real estate. However, you can sometimes use this type of affidavit for non-property assets – depending on the rules of the institution that currently manages those items. Be prepared to discuss this topic in detail with your lawyer since there are certain limitations involved with using this type of affidavit.

For example, some title companies will not accept these types of affidavits when you’re trying to establish a legally valid chain of title for property. In addition, since no personal representative will be appointed, there won’t be anyone who can manage the estate’s assets and pay all required debts. Also, two witnesses must sign this type of affidavit and both are liable for any false statements that may be contained in it.

  1. By filing a Small Estate Affidavit. If your attorney takes this approach, he’ll first have to determine if the estate is solvent and if it’s worth $75,000 or less. In addition, the affidavit can only be used to transfer title to a homestead. Furthermore, there will be no appointed personal representative to collect all the assets, pay all required debts and deal with necessary third parties. Financially responsible witnesses must also sign this type of affidavit.
  1. Using a probate court proceeding called a determination of heirship. The advantages of this approach include having a hearing, the presentation of evidence and a court issuing a judgment accepting or rejecting all submitted affidavits of heirship. However, some relatives eager to settle an estate may find this approach less appealing since it can be rather costly – mainly due to the need to file various pleadings with the probate court. You must also coordinate everything with the court appointed attorney ad litem who will investigate whether there’s any possible fraud regarding the filed affidavits of heirship. However, obtaining a court ruling that specific parties are lawful heirs is very useful;
  1. Handling the matter as either an independent or dependent administration of the estate.

The difference between these two types of administrations is based on the degree to which the probate court must be involved in the proceedings. The term “independent administration” simply means that the court has minimal involvement.

Whichever approach is chosen, there will need to be an appointment of a personal representative who is qualified to receive letters of administration provided by the probate court. These “letters” allow the personal representative to collect all the assets and pay all the debts. The biggest drawback of this approach is that it’s often the most expensive way to handle the estate of someone who died without a Will.

Hopefully, this general information has helped you see that creating a Will is one of the best ways to move forward into a more stable financial future.

Please feel free to contact one of our Murray Lobb lawyers so we can answer any questions you may have about settling someone else’s estate — or drawing up a Will (or full estate plan) of your own. We appreciate the opportunity to help our clients handle these types of matters and look forward to hearing from you soon.