The SBA Suggests 10 Key Steps for Starting a New Business

Once you’ve decided to start a new business, it can be tempting to simply moved forward with various tasks as they come to mind. While this may work for a few entrepreneurs, it’s always best to create an organized plan of action so you won’t waste time and cause problems for yourself that could easily have been avoided.

Fortunately, the SBA (Small Business Administration) provides excellent online materials that can help you plan the most useful way to start a new company – or expand the current reach of an existing one. Here’s a brief review of the ten important tasks that should normally be addressed first as you launch a new business.

The key steps for creating a solid foundation for your new business

  1. Decide where to locate your company. Prior to starting any market research, you’ll need to look at several cities to decide upon the best location for your business. This decision must be partly based on if you’ll be selling goods and services to your customers from a brick-and-mortar storefront or office – or if you’ll just be contacting potential customers on the phone or over the Internet. Be sure to select a location where many well-qualified job applicants live – as well as a city and state with reasonable business taxes;
  1. Develop a reliable market research plan. Once you’re certain about the goods or services your new business will sell, you must conduct market research to verify that there’s a definite need for what you’ll be selling in a specific location. This activity also involves identifying your potential customers and all known competitors; 
  2. Create a viable business plan. Most people starting a new business choose between a traditional business plan or a lean one for a basic start-up company. If you need to borrow money to finance your company, you’ll almost certainly have to provide a lender with a traditional business plan.

The traditional plan is normally very comprehensive – it describes your specific goods and services, provides a mission statement about what you seek to accomplish in the long run and names the initial team of professionals who will be running the company. It also states where the business will be located and how many employees you’ll need to hire. A traditional business plan should also describe the business structure you’ll be using, who will be handling specific tasks – and it should review your market analysis. Initial financial projections or earnings for the company should also be included.

In contrast, a lean start-up business plan may simply describe your goods and services, provide a statement about who will be running the company and state who you believe will be your most likely customers. It should also contain information about how you’ll initially finance the company and where it will be located;

  1. Make sure you have enough initial funding for the company. You and your business partners or advisors must determine how much money you’ll need to start your business. If you cannot raise this money among your business partners, then may have to try and obtain funds from venture capitalists or request a small business loan from a bank or through SBA resources. Other options include raising capital through crowdfunding or other online resources;
  2. Select the best business structure for your company. While many people run sole proprietorships if they’ll be handling all of the major company tasks themselves, others choose between forming such structures as partnerships, limited liability companies (LLCs) — or some type of corporation or cooperative;
  3. Decide upon the best name for your company. It’s a good idea to brainstorm with your partners or investors since you want to try and choose a name that clearly reflects the nature or “brand” of your business – as well as its spirit. Be aware that one of your first tasks will be to make sure the name you select is original and that it’s not already being used by anyone else;
  1. Be sure to register and protect your business name. After you’ve chosen the best name for your company, you’ll need to take steps to protect that name by properly registering it. Keep in mind that you may also need to register any trademark you’ll be using. Since additional ways of protecting your company name may also be required, you should always discuss this topic with your Houston business law attorney;
  2. You must request state and federal tax IDs. You will need to obtain an EIN (employer identification number) for many reasons. For example, you must have an EIN to open a bank account for your company and to pay taxes (among other tasks). Depending on the different states where your company will be operating, you may also need to obtain one or more state tax IDs;
  3. Obtain all required licenses and permits. Your specific type of business activity and where you’ll be working will determine the types of permits and licenses you must obtain, if any;
  4. Be sure to open one or more business accounts for your company. These most often include checking and savings accounts, credit card accounts and a merchant services account. Depending on the nature of your business and its initial size, you may be able to simply start with a checking account and then open other accounts as the need arises.

Please feel free to contact one of our Murray Lobb attorneys for legal advice as you address any or all of the various steps named above while starting a new business. We’ve had the opportunity to help many clients establish a wide variety of successful businesses in the past and are prepared to provide you will all the guidance you may need.

Special Estate Planning Concerns for Second Marriages

If you’ve recently married for a second time or are planning to do so, it’s important to meet with your attorney to be sure all your assets will still be properly distributed in the future. Even if you think your new spouse is very trustworthy, you must understand how Texas community property laws may affect all preferred beneficiaries when you pass away one day.

In order to minimize future misunderstandings, many spouses in second marriages enter into property agreements that help balance out the interests of all children from prior marriages – as well as those who might be born into your new one.

Before reviewing some of the basic legal documents your lawyer may need to redraft on your behalf now that you’ve remarried, it will be helpful to note some of the complications that can develop when newlyweds simply assume their current estate plans don’t need to be updated.

Careful planning can help you minimize problems with the future disposition of your estate

  • Suppose you’ve married a much younger new spouse and you have children from your first marriage. What will likely happen to your home and all other possessions upon your death? Sometimes, newlyweds just assume that all will go well once the older spouse dies first – and that older children of the deceased spouse will just wait many years until the new spouse passes dies to inherit the family home and other wealth.

Unfortunately, bitter legal fights can erupt between your adult children and your surviving spouse under this type of scenario. What’s often best is to leave an insurance policy (and possibly other funds) in a trust, so that your children can receive specific amounts of money upon your death – and then other property or wealth years later when your surviving spouse finally passes away;

  • What if your new spouse keeps insisting that if you pass away first, he’ll make sure your kids from an earlier marriage will inherit all that you wish, without stating this in newly executed documents? Can this type of arrangement ever be risky? Yes, it can. It’s always possible that you and your new spouse will experience hard times financially at some point in the future. If that happens, keeping sincere early promises may no longer seem reasonable to a surviving spouse left with only a modest amount of money.

Always update your estate plan when you remarry. And if you and your new spouse hold very different attitudes toward certain financial bequests, go ahead and meet with different attorneys to update your estate plans separately. However, make sure you both understand your responsibilities to your new spouses under the new estate plans (and ask your lawyers to review both plans to be sure they won’t precipitate any crises);

  • Will it cause unnecessary confusion for spouses in a second marriage to hold joint bank accounts in the future to pay certain mutual expenses – without jeopardizing the later disposition of assets when one spouse dies? That arrangement should work out fine, although you should both consider also maintaining separate bank accounts to help you pay expenses tied to all separate properties you brought into the marriage.

Should new spouses carefully revise named beneficiaries in POD and retirement accounts?

The answer to that question is almost always, “Yes.” Be sure to bring information about all accounts you have when meeting with your Houston estate planning attorney. You should also bring copies of any property deeds in which you’re named — and information about any trust accounts you currently have (or may desire). Your attorney will also need to see copies of your current Last Will and Testament, 401k and POD accounts, all retirement accounts and all insurance policies.

If you need any advice about your current estate plan due to an upcoming marriage – or divorce, please contact one of our Murray Lobb attorneys at your convenience. We will look forward to providing you with the documents you’ll need to feel confident and secure about your entire family’s financial future.

2020 W. Wheatland Road

Common Reasons for Creating a Spendthrift Trust

Nearly all of us have relatives who need extra help managing their income and assets. When we can, we try to find ways to help them. In some instances, you might have a grandson or granddaughter who’s having trouble holding down a steady part-time job during college – or trying to make ends meet after battling a lengthy addiction. Your troubled relative might also be older and starting to struggle with handling all his monthly financial affairs.

Whatever the individual’s special needs may be, you can often help by making the person a beneficiary of a spendthrift trust.

How Should You Define This Type of Trust to the Beneficiary?

You may first want to simply say that, because you greatly care for this individual, you want to remove all or most of her current money management problems from her life. You can then say that you’ve named the person as a beneficiary of a special trust account that will be managed by a trustee. You should then quickly point out that you’ll be personally choosing the exact terms governing the trust so the trustee can properly meet specific needs of the beneficiary.

Should the beneficiary ask if she can personally manage the money, you must be ready to say that you have considered that alternative and prefer to disburse the funds over time. You might also note your desire to prevent the funds from being taken by untrustworthy creditors. (Of course, there are legal exceptions that do allow some creditors to reach these funds, and they’ll be briefly addressed below).

It’s also useful to tell the beneficiary that the funds or property that you’ll be placing in the trust as its creator (grantor) are generally referred to as the trust principal.

What Basic Terms and Provisions Are Normally Included in a Spendthrift Trust?

As your Houston estate planning lawyer will tell you, specific language must be included in the trust document, making it clear that you’re creating a spendthrift trust, in keeping with Texas law. This enabling language is designed to fully protect all the property and funds that you’re placing in the trust from others who might try to illegally reach them. All of this is clearly explained in the Texas Property Code, Title 9, entitled “Trusts.”

Your spendthrift trust language will clearly state that since the beneficiary has no right to directly reach and control the funds – neither can most creditors. Most grantors also include some specific language indicating that they are trying to provide for the beneficiary’s general needs.

As the grantor/settlor you must also clearly state all the trustee’s rights, duties and obligations while administering the trust. The trustee’s job can be a very difficult one, especially if the beneficiary decides to legally challenge the trustee by demanding large sums of money for serious medical, educational or basic living expenses not expressly referenced in the trust.

When Can Creditors & Other Parties Successfully Obtain Funds from a Spendthrift Trust?

The laws in most states allow creditors that can prove that a beneficiary owes them money for basic “necessities” (like shelter or food) to win judgments and collect funds from these types of trusts. Other legal obligations that can be paid out of spendthrift trust funds (once legal action has been taken) include child support, alimony or support of a past (or current) spouse and certain government claims.

When funds are periodically released to a beneficiary, creditors can also try to obtain them based on judgments they’ve obtained. 

Please feel free to contact one of our Murray Lobb attorneys to learn more about the various types of trusts and other estate planning tools that we can draft to meet all your needs, including a spendthrift trust.

Does the Issuance of a 1099-C Discharge Debtors from Liability?

Does the issuance of a 1099-C discharge debtors from liability? The answer is no, the issuance of a 1099–C does not discharge debtors from liability from the subject debt. The filing of a Form 1099–C is a creditor’s required means of satisfying a reporting obligation to the IRS; it is not a means of accomplishing an actual discharge of debt, nor is it required only where an actual discharge has already occurred.

The fact situation is simple and straightforward. A creditor who has loaned money to a debtor makes an internal decision to “write off” of the debt on its books. At that point in time, the creditor is required by IRS regulations to report the write-off.

While only a handful of courts across the United States have addressed this issue, most have arisen in the context of a bankruptcy. Almost every court that has addressed the issue and the few reported decisions in Texas have concluded that the issuance of a 1099–C does not discharge debtors from liability of the subject debt.

The most thorough analysis of the issue and most cited opinion is In re Zilka, 407 B.R. 684 (Bankr. W.D. Pa. 2009), a bankruptcy decision from Pennsylvania. The Court in In re Zilka found four separate independent legal basis upon which to hold that the issuance of a 1099–C does not discharge debtors from liability. The four legal bases are as follow:

1. The IRS requires the issuance of a 1099-C. 26 U.S.C. § 6050P(a) provides, in pertinent part, that “[a]ny applicable entity which discharges . . . the indebtedness of any person during any calendar year shall make a return . . . setting forth . . . the name, address, and TIN of each person whose indebtedness was discharged . . .  [as well as] the date of the discharge and the amount of the indebtedness discharged.” The information return just referred to is a Form 1099–C.

However, “a discharge of indebtedness” is “deemed to have occurred . . . if and only if there has [been] an identifiable event described in paragraph (b)(2) of this section, whether or not an actual discharge of indebtedness has occurred on or before the date on which the identifiable event has occurred.” 26 C.F.R. § 1.6050P–1(b)(2) sets forth eight identifiable events that can trigger the filing and issuance of a Form 1099–C, among which is “(G) [a] discharge of indebtedness pursuant to a decision by the creditor, or the application of a defined policy of the creditor, to discontinue collection activity and discharge debt.”

2. The IRS does not view a Form 1099–C as an admission by the creditor that it has discharged the debt and can no longer pursue collection. In an IRS Information Letter issued in October 2005 it addressed concerns regarding the impact of a creditor’s compliance with the Form 1099–C reporting obligation and the continuing liability of a debtor on the subject debt. The IRS assured a concerned creditor that filing a Form 1099–C satisfies the reporting requirements of the statute and implementing regulations, neither of which “prohibit collection activity after a creditor reports by filing a Form 1099–C.”

3. That a Form 1099–C does not constitute an admission by the creditor that it has discharged the debt and can no longer pursue collection thereon is consistent with the fact a creditor can issue a corrected Form 1099-C if a recovery of some or all of the monies owed by the debtor subsequently occurs. In another IRS Information Letter issued in October 2005, the IRS responded to a creditor that it “does not view a Form 1099–C as an admission by the creditor that it has discharged the debt and can no longer pursue collection.”

4. The issuance of a Form 1099–C does not constitute one of the means of discharging debt pursuant to the Uniform Commercial Code, § 3.604 governs Negotiable Instruments. Section 3.604 of the Tex. Bus. & Comm. Code, Discharge by Cancellation or Renunciation provides that:

• A person entitled to enforce an instrument, with or without consideration, may discharge the obligation of a party to pay the instrument:

(1) by an intentional voluntary act, such as surrender of the instrument to the party, destruction, mutilation, or cancellation of the instrument, cancellation or striking out of the party’s signature, or the addition of words to the instrument indicating discharge; or

(2) by agreeing not to sue or otherwise renouncing rights against the party by a signed record.

The most recent Texas court to address the issue was Capital One, N.A. v. Massey, No. 4:10 CV–01707, 2011 WL 3299934 (S.D. Texas Aug. 1, 2011) wherein the United States District Court for the Southern District of Texas “adopt[ed] the view that a 1099–C does not discharge debtors from liability” because the form is “issued to comply with IRS reporting requirements” and the IRS does not view it “as a legal admission that a debtor is absolved from liability for a debt.”

Lasting, pursuing collection of a debt that has been written off and reported on a 1099-C does not violate Tex. Fin. Code § 392.304(a)(8) which prohibits the collection a debt that was “discharged and/or extinguished against them.”

Some Pros and Cons of Having an Adult Guardian Appointed

While most middle-aged and older adults recognize their need for a Will and a basic estate plan, far fewer understand when it may (or may not) be in their best interest to have a formal guardian appointed to help them manage all their personal and financial (estate) decisions. In general, if you’re still capable of making fully competent decisions regarding your finances, basic living arrangements, and medical care needs, you probably don’t need a guardian appointed for you.

However, if you’re currently suffering from some form of mental incapacity or dementia that impairs your ability to handle such matters, then you may need to have a guardian appointed to help you manage your affairs (either temporarily or permanently).

This article first reviews some of the dangers that can occur when the wrong person becomes your guardian and then lists the various legal documents that can help all adults provide for their general medical, financial, and everyday needs should they unexpectedly become very ill or need extensive medical treatment.

Can Courts Abruptly Take Away Elderly People’s Rights to Live as They Choose?

The New Yorker magazine recently published an article in October 2017 entitled, “How the Elderly Lose Their Rights.” It details the real-life experience of many seniors who suddenly found themselves under the control of a “questionable” court-appointed guardian in Clark County, Nevada. In some cases, these older Americans were in regular contact with family members – when a local court guardian decided that they could no longer live on their own and required her overbearing control of their lives.

In some instances, all it took was a hired home healthcare aide’s statement that the elderly person could no longer properly care for himself or his spouse, even though appropriate outside care had obviously been employed for such purposes. One court guardian (who’s been indicted for her actions), would simply arrive at an elderly person’s apartment or senior care facility and announce that she had just gotten herself appointed as that person’s (or couple’s) legal guardian. That same day, the individuals were then forced to leave where they had been living and go move in where this previously unknown woman directed.

Immediate attempts by family and other outsiders who tried to help proved futile. Instead of the court allowing the elderly to appear in court to respond to concerns about their mental competency, the court allowed a court-appointed, professional guardian to file emergency ex parte petitions indicating that immediate decisions had to be made regarding the seniors’ best interests. One couple’s daughter who tried to help her parents after they suddenly disappeared from their home had to endure various types of character assassination before she finally won their freedom. By that time, all her parent’s finances had been drained – supposedly spent in their best interests.

Sadly, the article also contains the chilling observation that this type of elder abuse has become far too common in many counties across this nation – especially in areas where seniors tend to congregate. Hopefully, more states will follow Nevada’s current plans to soon pass legislation that will expressly give seniors the right to be represented by attorneys during all guardianship competency hearings.

Conclusions

Since no adult ever wants to be suddenly “kidnapped”  or taken somewhere (at any age) by a court-appointed guardian or “professional” — it makes sense for all older adults to have their lawyers provide them with the following critical documents:  an Advance Directive for Medical Care, a Durable Power of Attorney and a Declaration of Guardian in the Event of Later Incapacity or Need of Guardian. By naming someone you know and trust in these documents, it should make it easier for your relatives and friends to help you in a manner that fully comports with your stated preferences should you one day become very ill or incapacitated.

Please contact our law firm if you need to ask any questions about creating an estate plan or having the types of documents referenced in this article prepared for you and other loved ones.