Crafting Effective Job Descriptions and Ads

Creating the type of job ads that attract large pools of highly qualified candidates takes careful thought and planning, like every other important business task. Besides providing an accurate job title and listing the main duties of a position, you need to let job applicants know if a specific job will fit in with their current lifestyle and priorities.

Of course, you must also describe the minimum job qualifications and what you require in the way of prior experience and training. And all of this must be done in a manner that carefully avoids discriminating against anyone.

While drafting a proper job description may sound a bit intimidating, it can be done with relative ease if you’ll start by making a list of the key facts you need to communicate – while still making the job sound highly desirable. The job ad itself should be considerably shorter, in keeping with the online or print forum where you’ll be placing it.

Here’s a closer look at some of the broad topics and details you should always try to include.

After picking an appropriate job title — add a clear list of essential job duties

Since all jobs tend to change a bit over time, it’s a good idea to visit briefly with the person who recently supervised the worker in the vacant position. This will let you know if your old job description needs to be updated or expanded. Next, make a list of the most common tasks the person hired will need to handle on a regular basis. Always start by listing the most time-consuming job assignments.

Also, be sure to indicate if the open job is an entry-level, mid-level or senior-level job. And you’ll need to note whether the position involves training or supervising other employees —

and what percentage of the employee’s time may be devoted to such tasks.

What type of academic background – and prior job experience – are you seeking?

To avoid potentially discriminatory language, it’s wise to indicate that you’re looking for someone with either a college degree “or equivalent experience.” Be sure to also specifically list any professional licenses or certificates that the person must have already earned. Likewise, you should clearly state whether it’s a job that may frequently require over-time, weekend shifts or travel.

When you fail to mention such factors, you’ll likely end up interviewing people who would never have applied had you provided that crucial information.

Make one list of all the required skills – and a separate list of all desired skills

If the work requires clerical skills, you might indicate a minimum typing speed and then list the specific types of software program skills required. If you need someone who is bilingual, make it very clear if you’ll expect complete fluency.

Should you believe the job requires the ability to work well under pressure while meeting strict deadlines, it’s always wise to include that information, too.

Provide a brief description of the job culture, if possible

If your company is in start-up mode, be sure to share that since there are people who know that they usually do their best work in more stable or established work environments. Likewise, if you’ll be expecting this person to always work in-house – or remotely on one or more days – try to indicate that as well since some workers either strongly prefer that lifestyle or know that they do their best work in an office setting where they can readily consult with others on a regular basis.

Consider indicating the desired new hire’s personality type and work traits

If the person you want to hire needs highly developed interpersonal skills – perhaps because it’s a receptionist or job training position — you may want to mention that as a desirable strength. Likewise, if the new employee will be conducting considerable research for your firm, it’s fine to say that you’re looking for someone with strong analytical skills and keen attention to detail.

Unique job demands or requirements

In order to avoid creating problems for yourself with the Americans with Disabilities Act and other legislation designed to protect specific job applicant and employee rights, it’s best to note unique requirements in your job ad so applicants will clearly know what’s required in advance.

Here are some job demands that should always be noted in your full job description provided to all selected applicants prior to job interviews.

  • Night shifts. Let applicants know if the new person may have to regularly tackle night shifts, in keeping with your company’s changing needs;
  • Ability to lift and/or carry small or large objects of a certain weight. People deserve to know in advance if they’ll need to lift heavy boxes or other objects on a regular basis. When possible, try to provide an accurate range of weights involved;
  • Use of personal vehicle. Be sure to note this and indicate that any job offer will be conditional, based on an applicant providing a recent copy of an acceptable driving record;
  • On-call work shifts. If this employee must be available on an on-call basis during certain days or weeks – on a regular schedule — be sure to note this since it lets those with unique family obligations (or physical limitations) know whether the job is still a desirable one for them.

If your company does federal contracting work – keep EEOC requirements in mind

When a business does this type of work, it must always note in any job ad that all applicants will receive full consideration, regardless of their color, race, sex, national origin or religion. Many companies simply note this at the end of their ads by indicating that they’re an EEO (Equal Employment Opportunity) Employer. 

Even some companies who aren’t required to include an EEOC statement include one so that their applicants will be fully aware that they’re encountered an employer dedicated to fair hiring from a fully diverse group of applicants.

Additional comments about legally risky, outdated jargon & online “keywords”

Remember to use gender-neutral labels like “salesperson” as opposed to salesman and “server” in place of waiter. Likewise, “general repair person” is better than “handyman.” It’s also preferable to indicate you’re seeking to fill a “part-time position” than to indicate that you’re looking for a college student.

Finally, give thought to obtaining direct advice – or even job-writing templates – from one of the major online job boards like Monster.com, Indeed.com or Careerbuilder.com. They can also help you with selecting the most useful “keywords” that you’ll want to include in your ad.

Please feel free to contact one of our Murray Lobb attorneys whenever you need any advice about how to properly attract and interact with job applicants – or if you need help with any employee management issues that may arise. Our firm can also supply you with any employee contracts and other general business documents.

Determining Fault After an Employee’s Accident in a Company Car

One of the most awkward moments for any worker is getting into a vehicle accident while driving a company car. Since every employee wants to be viewed as highly responsible, this type of event requires sincere humility while explaining the circumstances of the accident.

If the employee was clearly at fault and using the company car for personal reasons at the time the collision occurred – liability issues can quickly multiply – especially if a third party was injured.

Before noting some of the key factors that must be evaluated when this type of event occurs, here’s a quick review of some insurance policy definitions.

Insurance policies that may be involved when an employee has a vehicle accident

  • Commercial auto policy. The coverage or protection this type of policy offers to a company can be crucial following an accident. It’s designed to protect the business from having to cover all the personal injury expenses and property damage. Brokers often speak of this as a business auto or commercial auto policy;
  • A general liability policy. Most employers carry one of these because it offers protection against all kinds of third-party legal claims, including those that might be filed after a third party falls down and is injured on company property – or hurt during an auto accident caused by an employee driving a company car;
  • Worker’s compensation insurance. All employers of a certain size should carry this type of insurance that normally provides benefits to workers injured on the job – including those who were handling official business in a company car when a vehicle accident occurred;
  • A policy rider. An amendment to an insurance policy. Some employees who choose to use their personal cars for business add a special rider to their personal auto insurance policies to provide coverage if they get into an accident while handling company business. Depending on the employee’s relationship with the company, some employers will reimburse the employee for the added expense this type of rider adds to the employee’s basic auto insurance policy.

Once liability for the accident is determined, one or more of the policies referenced above will have to be used to cover all the injury expenses and property damage repairs.

The legal doctrine of respondeat superior and employer liability

When an employee is driving a company car at the time of an accident (while actively handling assigned business tasks) – that s/he did not personally cause – the employer will normally be responsible for paying for all the damages.  However, since various jurisdictions apply aspects of the respondeat superior doctrine differently, it’s important to check with your Houston business lawyer to find out exactly how this doctrine is applied in Texas.

Stated in general terms, respondeat superior usually indicates that the principal (employer) is normally responsible for most activities handled by the employee (agent).

One or more of the employer’s insurance policies (in addition to worker’s compensation), will normally cover medical expenses and the costs incurred due to property damage. However, insurance companies often quarrel over whether the employee was clearly handling business tasks at the time of the accident — and if s/he had current authorization to use the company vehicle.

Liability can shift when an employee was totally or partially responsible for the accident

The circumstances surrounding each accident will normally determine the exact percentage of damages that an employee must pay under his/her own policy. Whether any type of indemnity is offered to the employee usually depends on whether the third party involved caused the accident.

In most cases, an employee who caused a collision will be held fully responsible for all damages under his/her own personal auto accident policy.

However, when a third party caused the accident, there are still specific circumstances that will allow an employer to deny all liability. Several of these exceptions are set forth below.

  • The “frolic or detour” exception. If the employee was running a personal errand at the time the accident in the company car occurred, she must normally cover all the damages under her own personal auto accident policy;
  • The employee was under the influence of alcohol or drugs at the time of the accident. Once this has been conclusively established, the employer may be able to deny all liability;
  • The accident did not take place during normal business hours. However, there can be exceptions – like when a salesperson is traveling to his/her next sales destination on behalf of the company;
  • The employee was an independent contractor using his/her own vehicle. Potential liability for all types of vehicle accidents should be clearly spelled out in each employee’s company paperwork – before that individual can handle company business in any vehicle.

It’s always wise for an employee who was just in a company vehicle accident to request a timely meeting with company officials as soon as that person’s health allows. Everyone may benefit if a

compromise regarding liability can be reached – unless the employee’s behavior was clearly unacceptable.

If you have any questions about how your business or insurance provider should handle a specific type of accident involving a company car, please feel free to call one of our Murray Lobb attorneys. We can provide you with our legal opinion and possibly suggest legal paperwork you might want to have every employee sign before ever issuing any of them a company car for their use.

Always Interact Carefully with Workers on FMLA Leave

For over 20 years, the Family Medical Leave Act has helped millions of qualified employees take time off from their jobs to address serious family or personal medical issues. While it’s important to provide critical job security at such times, employers still retain the right to make important business decisions – even when FMLA rights are being lawfully exercised.

Some of the most challenging administrative issues that come up with the FMLA involve disabled employees who are covered by ADA provisions — and those who have filed worker’s compensation claims. Yet any employee’s situation can prove problematic – especially when the person has used all the FMLA time allowed – and is now requesting even more time off due to continuing medical problems.

What follows is a brief overview of an employer’s responsibility to rehire employees on FMLA leave and events that might justify firing or laying off an employee on this type of leave. The article concludes with a look at how you should respond when an employee requests additional time off after using the full 12 weeks allowed under the FMLA in a calendar year.

Must you always allow employees on FMLA leave to return to their previous positions?

The FMLA requires employers to allow workers to return to their former positions (or jobs similar in duties and pay) upon exhausting all available leave time. If a business or office covered by the FMLA fails to do this, the employee asking to return can sue for sizeable damages. However, this employee right isn’t absolute — for reasons referenced below.

What if your office had already planned to lay off everyone in the absent employee’s unit?

Employees seeking to return from FMLA leave do not have any rights that are greater than what they would have had if they had not taken leave time. In other words, if your company had already been planning to lay off everyone in the same unit as the employee who is now on leave and asking to come back – that person doesn’t have an absolute right to return.

However, you should still move forward cautiously with laying off this individual, especially if your office had not already fully documented the impending layoff. It’s always best to first consult with your Houston employment law attorney before terminating any employee away on FMLA leave — or who has been absent due to any other medically-related issue.

What if you became aware of misconduct when an employee is away on FMLA leave?

If you have learned since the absent employee’s leave started that s/he committed some type of prior fraud or malfeasance against your company, you can terminate the employee for cause. Of course, you must have very clear proof of the fraud (or gross misconduct) before terminating the employee. In many instances, you’ll probably need to meet with the employee before letting them go so they can respond to the evidence you’ve uncovered.

It’s also possible that an employee might commit some type of fraud against your company while on FMLA leave. For example, the employee might fraudulently use company-issued credit cards for personal gain without permission — or share proprietary business information with a competitor. It’s always wise to ask your attorney to evaluate the grounds for termination before terminating any employee.

What should you do when an employee asks for more than 12 weeks of FMLA leave?

While the Family Medical Leave Act does not guarantee any qualified worker more than 12 weeks of time off during any 12-month period, you should never try to immediately fire someone who claims to be too ill to return. For example, when a disabled employee has taken the full amount of time off to address medical problems under the FMLA, you may have an obligation to provide that person with additional time off – if doing so might lawfully be considered a “reasonable accommodation” under the ADA. However, no employee is entitled to unlimited leave.

Likewise, an employee who has already filed a worker’s compensation claim may still be too injured to return. Always consult with your lawyer before trying to fire these employees – since state worker’s compensation laws and ADA provisions may dictate your next steps. Should any employee simply take additional leave beyond 12 weeks without discussing their needs with you, such behavior could subject them to termination. Employers are always entitled to ask how long a leave is being requested.

While the potential problems tied to administering the FMLA are almost limitless, the discussion provided above should provide you with some useful guidance.

If you need advice on properly administering the FMLA or interacting with employees who have requested any type of leave, please feel free to contact one of our Murray Lobb attorneys. We’ve been providing this type of legal advice for many years and can help you respond fairly to all employee management issues.

Is Your Business Honoring All Federally Protected Employee Rights?

Most personnel managers must work hard to keep up with all the federally guaranteed rights owed to employees and job applicants. And when small companies aren’t required to do the same, they should still try to offer all the legal rights referenced below since every office runs more smoothly when employees are treated with respect and granted as many rights as possible. Employers must also be sure they’re upholding all state employment laws that are often more favorable to employees.

Although many federal laws govern various employee rights, there are five specific ones that set the core standards involving discrimination — and provide fairness when addressing worker hours, wages and time off to handle urgent medical needs. All business supervisors and managers can benefit from reviewing the following brief summaries of Title VII, The Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA), the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) and the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA).

Basic employment standards established by Title VII

Businesses with 15 or more employees must abide by the full provisions of this law. While some might assume that employers with fewer than 15 employees can openly discriminate, lawyers frequently point out that other federal statutes (42 USC Sections 1981 and 1983) still protect ethnic and racial minorities against discrimination. These statutes govern the formation of contracts — and hiring employees always involves some type of oral or written contract.

Title VII strictly forbids all employers from discriminating against anyone regarding all

possible terms and conditions of employment. Therefore, employers cannot discriminate when handling any of the following activities.

  • Recruiting and hiring
  • Training and assigning work
  • Evaluating or measuring work performance
  • Disciplining
  • Promoting and transferring
  • Providing all promised benefits – including those owed after employment ends
  • Discharging

If your office has any questions about these standards, it’s best to contact your Houston employment law attorney to discuss your specific concerns in greater detail.

Employee rights guaranteed by the ADEA

While it may seem like a non-existent problem to younger workers, discrimination against older employees often incurs in many workplaces, especially when workers are nearing retirement when added benefits will likely vest. The Age Discrimination in Employment Act is designed to protect all employees age 40 and older when they work for an employer with at least 20 total employees.

All the basic employer activities listed above (regarding Title VII) must be applied fairly to older workers. Stated differently, the federal government forbids treating younger workers in a preferred manner over older workers who often have both strong skills and highly valuable years of experience.

Rights guaranteed under the ADA to the disabled

When a job applicant or hired employee can demonstrate his or her ability to handle all required job functions – without or without reasonable accommodations – discrimination is strictly forbidden. The ADA defines a disability as a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits any of a person’s major life functions or activities.

Reasonable accommodations should be offered to help the disabled person fully perform all required tasks, unless such adjustments would result in a fundamental alteration or change in meeting the employer’s program needs.

While the ADA has helped many workers, there’s still a need for greater societal change since many employers who can see a job applicant’s disabilities will privately opt to only hire those who don’t appear to have any cognitive or mobility issues.

Rights provided by the FLSA to all employees

The federal government has used the Fair Labor Standards Act to establish basic standards governing worker hours, minimum rates of pay and the handling of overtime hours. However, state law can offer more favorable rights, including a higher minimum wage.

Individual employers often choose to designate workers as either at-will employees who can be dismissed without cause or contract employees who must be provided with just reasons for their dismissal. The U. S. Department of Labor (DOL) states that if a company is a covered “enterprise,” and its workers are not exempt (or contract employees), the company must comply with all the FLSA provisions. Since determining what constitutes an “enterprise” isn’t always straightforward, you may need the help of your employment law attorney to interpret this for you. However, the DOL states that even if a company doesn’t qualify as a covered enterprise, all of its employees may still be protected by the FLSA provisions if their assigned tasks meet “interstate commerce” requirements.

Worker privileges available under the Family Medical Leave Act

This legislation applies to private employers with 50 or more employees working within 75 miles of the employer’s main worksite. To qualify for the extended leave provided under the FMLA, workers must have been employed by the company for at least twelve (12) months prior to making a request — and meet other specific criteria set forth under the law. Employees are supposed to be reinstated to their past jobs (or very similar ones) upon returning.

The FMLA is often used by a worker to care for a very ill, immediate family member or when the covered employee is personally battling a serious medical condition. Great care must be exercised when any worker states that s/he is not yet physically able to return once the full amount of leave allowed has been used (to avoid running afoul of provisions of state disability laws and the ADA.)

If you have any questions regarding how your office should apply any state or federal laws to employee issues, please don’t hesitate to call one of our Murray Lobb attorneys. We can also provide you with legal advice as to how some of these laws may have been recently modified by new Texas statutes.

Handling Employee Requests for Religious Accomodations

Whether you’re running a large corporation or a small business, it can be challenging to properly reply to employee requests for religious accommodations. However, if you’ll listen carefully to what’s being asked and thoughtfully weigh all your options, you should be able to respond appropriately. As the employer, it’s your duty to strike the proper balance between honoring a legitimate request and prioritizing the most crucial needs of your business.

Here’s a brief overview of the key topics involved with honoring religion rights in the workplace after receiving employee accommodation requests.

Employment discrimination based on religion is forbidden by law

Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 prohibits employers from discriminating against employees based solely on religion. Upon first learning about this statute, most employers ask how the term “religion” is defined — and exactly when they must fully abide by this law. Stated succinctly, employers should try to make reasonable accommodations based on religious beliefs (and practices) whenever doing so will not place an “undue burden” on their businesses.

How does the EEOC define “religion?”

The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission provides a very broad definition of “religion” that is not limited to just well-known faith groups such as Christians, Jews, Buddhists, Muslims and Hindus. The EEOC states that the employee’s beliefs can be new or uncommon – and separate from those espoused by any formal group or sect. The practice the employee wants to honor must be sincerely held and of a clear, religious nature – as opposed to a mere political, social or economic philosophy.

What are some of the most common types of requested religious accommodations?

  • Permission to attend special worship services during normal work hours;
  • A request by a female employee to wear a headscarf or “hijab” at work;
  • Permission for a male employee to wear his hair long – in keeping with religious beliefs. Some Jewish men also ask to wear “skull caps” or yarmulkes on special religious days;
  • Time off on specific “holy days” – or a day like Saturday or Sunday, in keeping with faith practices;
  • A flexible work schedule that allows for “breaks” during which specific types of prayers may be said;
  • A request to be exempted from specific job tasks, such as dispensing birth control pills or handling specific duties that help advance war efforts. (Members of the Jehovah’s Witnesses and other faith communities might make these types of requests);

While this list is not intended to be exhaustive, it should provide you with a better understanding of the types of accommodations employees may request.

How can employers determine if a request will cause an “undue hardship”?

After making sure you understand the specific nature of each request, you’ll have to decide if your business can still function smoothly if you grant the accommodation. Here are some questions you should be sure to ask yourself.

  • Will making the accommodation prove unduly expensive? For example, what should you do if an employee asks to take off work to attend a Good Friday church service? Will saying “Yes” leave a key job or position uncovered in the person’s absence? Do you have any other employees willing to cover for the individual needing to leave? If no one volunteers to help, can you afford to pay any overtime to a qualified employee (or an outside temp) to cover the position?
  • Is the request one that might violate your company’s legitimate health or safety rules? If so, can you find another way to work out the situation? For example, if a young man wants to wear his hair long in keeping with his stated religious beliefs – can you simply let him wear his hair tied in a ponytail during work hours — or keep it hidden under a work hat that you provide or consider acceptable?
  • Will it prove to be too disruptive to your regular office routine? Should you allow an atheist (or employees of different faiths) to wait and enter meetings normally started with Christian prayers after those prayers have concluded? It might be simpler to just pray with those of like mind at a different time on certain days. That way, you can probably avoid ostracizing those who have said that they don’t wish to take part in your specific prayer practices.
  • Is there a danger that granting one employee’s request to honor faith practices will lead to too many other, similar requests? The EEOC urges employers to consider all requests made very seriously — and to try and accommodate them whenever it’s reasonable. Few employees are likely to abuse this type of request. However, you might consider placing a statement in your employee handbook that all such requests must be made on a sincere basis — and that they’ll probably be granted if they don’t cause any great disruption in the company’s normal workflow – or provision of critical customer services.

All employers, managers and supervisors must avoid all forms of workplace retaliation

Unfortunately, there will always be a few biased supervisors or managers who may resent having to make any religious accommodations. Therefore, you must make sure that once any requests have been granted – the employees are not “punished” in any way.

For example, you cannot force all employees requesting permission to wear special religious clothing, hats or scarves to sit in a back office together where they’ll be less visible. That could be viewed as “retaliation” and make your company vulnerable to a lawsuit based on discrimination.

Conclusion

Be sure to treat every employee’s request for a religious accommodation with sincere respect. And always keep detailed notes in each employee’s file as to why you did or did not grant a request in case there are any later lawsuits. (For example, if you decide a request will prove to be too costly or place an “undue burden” on your business – make sure you can prove that with adequate facts and figures.)

Please feel free to contact one of our Murray Lobb attorneys with any questions you may have about making workplace accommodations based on religion (or disability). We can provide you with the legal guidance you’ll need to keep your business running smoothly.

 

  

What Should Be Included in Your Employee Handbook?

Both large and small companies can benefit from providing their workers with employee handbooks. These texts help employers answer key questions and clearly document that the same standards and rules govern their interactions with everyone. After all, no one wants to work for an employer who grants special privileges or benefits to some workers and not to others.

Employee handbooks also let employers set forth all their behavioral standards and procedural rules in a manner that can help them limit future liabilities — should anyone ever try to sue them for wrongful termination or acting in a discriminatory manner.

Before reviewing some crucial sections that many businesses like to include in their employee manuals, here’s a quick look at some of the topics that most workers want to see addressed.

Employees often search for information about key standards and office procedures

  • Be sure to outline your behavioral standards, attendance rules, office attire and the level of respect required for all relationships. Most employees are eager to learn how you view tardiness and what you consider acceptable clothing. Likewise, new workers want to learn about your conduct standards — and if your office has a “zero tolerance” policy toward all forms of sexual harassment and discrimination;
  • Always provide clear information about pay grades, qualifications for receiving medical insurance, pay periods and all forms of employee benefits. Workers usually start to relax more once they’re told how often they’ll be paid and the exact size of their payroll deductions. Likewise, it’s important to tell employees when (and if) they may be considered qualified for healthcare insurance;
  • Always state how often employee evaluations are conducted and the best ways workers can try to position themselves for future raises and promotions;
  • Be sure to note any individual or family leave policy provisions that your company honors. Always have your Houston employment law attorney read over this information for you, to be sure it fully complies with all current federal, state and local laws; and
  • Describe your most crucial emergency and safety procedures. Always tell your workers how they should evacuate from the office during extreme weather events, fires and even possible shooting incidents. Each new worker should be shown the proper way to exit the building on their first day on the job – and be shown where fire extinguishers and first aid kits are kept.

While these are just a small sampling of the general topics most employees want to see covered, they should help remind you of many other important subjects that you should cover in your employee handbooks.

The following list is compromised of some of the most commonly used sections in employee handbooks.

Key headings or sections most employers include in their employee handbooks

  • A “Preface” section. You may want to provide a general history of the company here, along with information about the founding members of the business. You can also note who currently heads up various office branches. The company’s key values and goals for the future are also often stated here. If you like, you can also add a brief congratulations to each new employee for being hired;
  • Material explaining all basic pay arrangements, promotions and current employee benefits. You can describe any 401k or stock options in this section, as well as the various types of retirement benefits. Overtime pay policies should also be covered;
  • A section that describes “at-will” employment versus jobs offered under contract;
  • Standards for employee behavior. Be sure to address the need for regular attendance; rules governing personal cell phone use during the work day – and any restrictions on using work computers for private purposes. (Ask your attorney if you need to obtain written permission from all employees to monitor their computer usage);
  • Formal leave policies. In this section, you’ll need to list all paid office holidays, how employees should handle vacation and sick leave, personal days off, family medical leave and time off to honor current military service commitments;
  • Employee termination policies. Be sure to note that these can vary, depending on; if an employee is considered an “at-will” worker who can be dismissed rather informally or if the person was hired under a formal contract.
  • Confidentiality policies. Be sure to clearly state what information and trade secrets the company considers confidential and trade secret. Ideally, all employees would signed a confidentiality and non-disclosure agreement.

Should you wish to review a large number of sections that different employers have included in their employee handbooks, consider reading 53 Key Sections of an Employee Handbook (and Other Helpful Tips).”

The Texas Workforce Commission also has a number of policies and a form of Employee Handbook available for free at https://twc.texas.gov/news/efte/table_of_contents-az.html. However, choosing the right sections for any employee handbook often requires a keen understanding of employment law and many complex human resources issues.

Please feel free to contact one of our Murray Lobb attorneys for help in drafting your new or updated employee handbook. We can provide you with the proper legal terminology required to meet your company’s unique needs.

Obtaining A Mechanic’s Lien in Texas

Once your company has been hired as a contractor or subcontractor to build, repair or renovate a structure for others, it may become necessary to file a mechanic’s lien on the property to ensure that you’ll be promptly paid for all your labor and materials. This type of lien must be filed with the County Recorder or Clerk in the county where the property is located. When a company fails to file this type of lien before the property worked on is sold – it can become more difficult to enforce your rights against the party who contracted with you.

As the State Bar of Texas explains in one of its publications addressing mechanic lien rights, shortly after you begin your work – and long before you ever need to send out any invoices  — you should also consider sending out two notices to the other parties to your contract. These are known as a Notice of Contractual Retainage Agreement and a Notice of Specially Fabricated Materials. 

Since mechanic’s liens can be rather detailed and are drafted a bit differently in most states, it’s always wise to obtain legal advice on how this document should be appropriately worded. However, it’s usually not best to begin trying to collect all funds owed to you by filing this type of lien. Your first step in the process of seeking payment should be to simply mail your final invoice and other pertinent statements to the party that hired your company.

Additional Steps That Should Precede the Filing of a Mechanic’s Lien

It’s a good idea to send your initial invoice and statements via certified mail so you can later document the amount of time the other party has had to pay all that’s owed. If you receive no response, you should directly call the party who initially agreed to pay your company for its work. If you still cannot obtain the money owed, you should ask your Texas business attorney to send a formal yet polite demand letter using the law firm letterhead, seeking immediate payment of all sums owed.

Once a late-paying client is aware that you have a law firm acting on your behalf, they will often submit prompt payment. If you still cannot recover all sums owed to you, be sure to ask your attorney how quickly you must file a mechanic’s lien – so that a sale of the property on which you worked cannot occur so quickly that it might compromise your rights.

Consider Filing a Lawsuit after Filing a Lien

As your lawyer will tell you, Texas is a bit different than many other states because our state’s laws providing the right to file a contractor’s lien are set forth in our state constitution. In fact, Article XVI, Section 37 of the Texas Constitution protects the rights of all mechanics, artisans and others who handle materials while building, repairing or renovating another party’s property. These rights are further set forth in Chapter 53 of the Texas Property Code.

Unfortunately, Chapter 53 is rather long and its description of your mechanic’s lien rights can be difficult to interpret at times. Nevertheless, an experienced attorney can provide you with answers to your questions that cannot be readily answered by reading that material. Common questions regarding liens often revolve around the types of contractors and subcontractors who can file a valid mechanic’s lien.

Texas law clearly indicates that most companies – even those who only briefly work on the property while planting a few trees or providing their landscaping skills — are entitled to file a lien.

Should You Also File a Lawsuit?

This is always a matter that you must discuss with your attorney. When it’s recommended, it’s normally done in addition to filing a mechanic’s lien against each of the appropriate parties to your contract. If you pursue this remedy, your lawyer will present several arguments. Chief among them will be the assertion that the party who directly hired you has breached your contract by failing to timely pay all reasonable amounts owed.

Our firm recognizes that it’s often difficult to understand all Texas mechanic’s lien rights, even if you’ve been working as a contractor or subcontractor for many years. Therefore, we welcome the chance to meet with you, so we can provide all the guidance you may need to obtain full and timely payment for all the services you have rendered to others.

Small Businesses Often Make Crucial Legal Mistakes

Even highly competent employees sometimes make serious legal errors while handling human resource, management, accounting and other business tasks. Since federal, state and local laws are constantly being updated, you must regularly speak with numerous employees to be sure they’re making timely and lawful decisions.

Should the feedback you receive concern you, it’s always best to consult with your Houston business law attorney to be sure you know how to promptly correct any possible errors. Lawsuits are often filed over very basic legal mistakes.

What are some of the most common legal errors that businesses keep making?

Most mistakes are made when employers try to be flexible with their rules. While compassion can go a long way toward helping you get along better with your employees, clarity and consistency are crucial. Always exercise caution when addressing the following issues.

  1. Each employee must be properly classified. You need to look at each position separately, based on all pertinent state and federal laws. If you simply decide to treat everyone as an “exempt” employee, you might be sued if you fail to provide proper overtime pay or adequate rest periods.
  2. Lunch breaks must be provided when required by law. Some employees may be entitled to a meal break after completing a specific number of hours during a shift.
  3. Make sure you’re properly labeling workers as either employees or independent contractors. You may hear from the IRS if you make this type of mistake. Take the time to speak with your lawyer about how you should carefully interact and communicate with independent contractors. Once a worker has strong legal grounds for believing that “employee” status has been conferred, you can be sued for specific benefits.
  4. You must be sure all employees understand what constitutes “sexual harassment.” If you’re sued in this field, one of your strongest defenses will be that you promptly trained all new managers and employees to help create a healthy work atmosphere. You must also develop a secure way for employees to submit complaints before problems escalate.
  5. You cannot punish or fire an employee for simply taking a leave of absence under the Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA). To protect yourself, keep accurate records of all employee evaluations being conducted at routine intervals. If you’re particularly concerned about the behavior of someone taking FMLA leave, ask your attorney when you should sit down with that employee to discuss why you’re carefully monitoring their work performance – before letting them go.
  6. Be sure to issue final paychecks on a timely basis to all employees who are leaving. Find out if you’re required to provide this type of check even before an employee has returned all employer-provided equipment, vehicles or other materials.
  7. You must handle making loans to employees in a very careful manner. While this is often a kind gesture, you must set up a formal repayment schedule. Never simply deduct a portion of what’s owed from each future paycheck.
  8. Be sure to properly handle all employer obligations under the Americans with Disability Act (ADA). You may need to make appropriate work accommodations and should always treat such workers fairly. Most disabled workers take great pride in being highly dependable and productive workers.
  9. COBRA healthcare coverage must be offered and administered properly. Give serious thought to creating a comprehensive package of this medical insurance paperwork so that it’s immediately ready to be given to qualified employees when they leave. Timing is critical so potential coverage won’t lapse.
  10. The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) must be explained and handled appropriately. Employees have a right to privacy regarding their medical data and information – be sure you’re adequately protecting it while processing claims.
  11. Pension concerns must be addressed in a timely and proper manner. The Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA) is a complicated law that requires extreme attention to detail. Always request legal advice when uncertain how to administer it.
  12. You must carefully handle all responsibilities under the Consumer Credit Protection Act (CCPA). You may need expert help calculating all your employees’ paycheck deductions for lawful wage garnishments – including those for child support and student loans. Look for highly respected software that may help your most experienced workers.
  13. Equal Pay Act. This law must be carefully followed since too many businesses keep failing to pay men and women fairly when handling similar work.
  14. Title VII concerns. Your company must avoid discriminatory practices when hiring, laying off and firing employees. Many businesses are learning to use multiple interviewers with highly diverse backgrounds so that fairness can be readily achieved.
  15. OSHA laws. You must make sure to keep adequate records covering all workplace accidents and injuries for an appropriate number of years — if you employ ten or more workers.

Should you have any questions about these topics, please contact your Murray Lobb lawyer to discuss your concerns. We have extensive experience providing legal advice to our clients so they can can readily comply with all federal, state and local laws.

Purchasing a Texas Franchise or Company Already in Business

Since only about twenty percent (20%) of new businesses survive past their first year, many savvy entrepreneurs prefer to buy a company or franchise that’s already up and running. That often proves wise – if the purchaser is willing to complete all the necessary research to make sure the current signs of financial success aren’t threatened by factors that no one is willing to disclose.

To make sure you handle all crucial due diligence inquiries properly, consider asking your experienced Houston business lawyers for the help and insights they can readily offer as you explore all the possible investment risks.

Once you’ve carefully answered the following questions — and analyzed the various concerns mentioned — you should be better prepared to decide whether to purchase a specific business or franchise.

Important business questions to answer – and key concerns to evaluate

  1. Is the product or service a good match for your interests and experience? People are often most successful when they feel passionate about the business they’re running. Should you be entering a field that’s unfamiliar to you, be prepared to hire different consultants as needed. Of course, if you’re buying into a franchise, the corporate headquarters will usually offer valuable training and products to help you;
  2. Why is the business for sale now? Is the current owner truly planning to retire or move closer to family across the country? Ask the current owner very direct questions. If you’re trying to buy a franchise, you’ll need to obtain a copy of the Franchise Disclosure Document. (This was formerly known as the Uniform Franchise Offering Circular or UFOC). It will fully inform you about a franchise’s financial, legal and personnel history;
  3. What business location is best for you? Be sure to ask the current owner to provide you with a breakdown of the business’ most regular customers. Are they residents of nearby neighborhoods — or simply commuters who work in the area? What types of seasonal downturns, if any, should you expect in business profits? Be ready to purchase zip code-based demographic reports that can provide you with information about your current customer base. There are also different types of geographic-information-system software programs that can help you evaluate consumer trends tied to local neighborhoods and the most recent census. (Always be sure your business location can offer adequate parking);
  4. Do you have adequate financial knowledge and good funding sources for your purchase? Be sure to have your Houston attorney review all the general business or franchise contracts tendered to you. Only work with a trustworthy financial consultant who can help you review each company’s current operating expenses. Also, obtain the help of a qualified lender you’ve dealt with in the past – or someone who comes highly recommended by business contacts you’ve known for years;
  5. Determine if you’re personally willing to take a “hands-on” approach to running the franchise or business. Be prepared to pay good wages to any managers you must hire. Good ones can “make or break” a successful franchise – or any other type of business. Be sure to tell any impressive managers and employees you meet that you may keep many current staff members on in the future – once you’ve reviewed all employee files;
  6. Be sure to personally observe the current quality of customer service. Ask about the specific training that helped produce the successful parts of it. Be prepared to provide an employee orientation and training program that honestly promises good wages and job benefits so employees will know how important they are to you;
  7. Network with similar local business owners and managers in the area. If necessary, consider taking one or more of them to lunch or dinner so you can pose insightful questions about their most difficult daily challenges doing business in the area;
  8. Find out what types of marketing plans are currently in place and if you can expect any corporate support in this regard. If you aren’t buying a franchise, contact the nearest small business administration (SBA) office to see what types of marketing and business planning programs they can offer to you;
  9. Plan on developing some type of regular community “presence” that can benefit everyone. This may take the form of financially sponsoring one or two local children’s sports teams. When you pay for the equipment and help secure uniforms – often emblazoned with your company name or logo — everyone will likely benefit;
  10. After you’ve completed all due diligence inquiries, visit pertinent local government offices. Check to see what types of new building permits have been issued – and find out if any new zoning changes will soon be enforced that could negatively affect the business you’re hoping to purchase.

Finally, read all you can about what has helped so many successful businesses and franchises remain profitable over recent decades. The more you learn about each of these companies, the more likely you’ll be to succeed in running your own franchise or new company.

At Murray Lobb, we’re always ready to help clients who may soon buy an operating business or franchise. We can guide you through all the detailed due diligence inquiries – and draft all the contracts and other documents you’ll need.

Administering the Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA)

Prior to the passage of the FMLA in 1993, American workers had few options when they needed extra time off from work due to their own serious medical conditions and accidents – or those of immediate family members. In fact, workers often had to use up all their vacation and sick leave benefits, if entitled to any, and then worry about their job security if they needed more time off. (However, eligible women could seek the special help offered by the 1978 Pregnancy Discrimination Act). 

Fortunately, the Family Medical Leave Act is still helping many 21st century workers address critical family caregiving duties and remains one of the signature pieces of legislation from the Clinton era.

Here’s a brief overview of specific provisions of the act that can help your qualified workers.

What basic opportunities does the FMLA offer qualified employees?

If a worker meets the minimum qualifications referenced below, it’s possible to take up to twelve (12) weeks of unpaid leave during a calendar year to take care of seriously ill family members, new children or the individual’s own major medical condition.

In 2008, the Family Medical Leave Act was updated so that qualified workers could also take time off work to take care of immediate family members who became very ill (or were seriously injured) while serving in the military.

The FMLA guarantees that qualified workers can take the extended time off work without having to worry about losing their jobs, their seniority or their employer-provided health care insurance.

Which types of employees are qualified to use the FMLA?

  • Those who have employers with 50 or more workers on the payroll for at least 20 workweeks during the preceding or current calendar year. A worker may still qualify even if all the 50 workers aren’t working at the same site – if they work within a 75-mile radius of one another;
  • Those who have worked for their employer for a minimum of 12 months, for a total of at least 1,250 hours. This means that many part-time workers may not qualify for FMLA leave. However, there are special rules that may apply to workers who are teachers, are highly paid – or are flight crew members of airlines;
  • Employees taking time off from jobs to handle their own “serious health conditions” – or those of covered family members. This time may also be used to take care of a new child or a servicemember in the immediate family who has been wounded.

Note:  Now that same-sex marriage is legal in all 50 states, LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender) individuals can also qualify like other workers to take care of their family members.

General questions often raised about the FMLA by employers and employees

Question 1:   Can the leave time requested be intermittent during a calendar year?

Answer 1:     Yes, if all the time that’s taken is counted toward the maximum amount of time off

                     allowed (12 weeks).

Question 2:  What government agency oversees and administers the FMLA for all federal

                     employees – as well as all state and local government workers and private

                     employees?

Answer 2:   The U. S. Department of Labor’s Wage and Hour Division. This is noted in Fact

                   Sheet #77B entitled, “Protection for Individuals Under the FMLA.”

Question 3: Are all workers qualified to take time off from their jobs under the FMLA entitled

                     to receive pay while away from work?

Answer 3:    No. The FMLA doesn’t require employers to pay qualified employees while they’re

                    taking this type of leave. However, it’s up to your employer to let you make a claim

                    for regular vacation time, sick leave or annual time off.

Question 4: Can a qualified worker ever be granted more than 12 weeks of paid or unpaid

                     FMLA leave in one year?

Answer 4:   An exception only exists for qualified family caregivers of wounded

                    servicemembers. They’re allowed to take up to 26 weeks off from their jobs in a

                    given calendar year.

Question 5: Can a qualified worker request more than 12 weeks off under the FMLA to take care

                    of a newborn – or a newly adopted child?

Answer 5:   In general, the answer is “No.” However, individual states can pass their own

                   versions of the FMLA and provide somewhat different benefits. To date, the Texas

                   Workforce Commission says that Texas has not passed such legislation.

Although the Family Medical Leave Act is a straightforward piece of legislation, it’s been updated with new rules and regulations and interpreted by the courts. Therefore, it’s usually wise for employers to ask their Houston employment lawyer for help if they have any specific questions about properly handling FMLA issues.

Please feel free to contact Murray Lobb so we can help explain any specific aspects of the FMLA to you as you provide its benefits to your employees. We’re always available to research any questions you may have.