Should My New Texas Business Be Formed as an “S” Corp or an LLC?

While deciding which business structure will best serve your needs, always consider several key factors. For example, look at how many employees you plan on hiring and how much time you want to spend managing the company. You should also make sure you’re fully protecting your personal assets against future lawsuits and not incurring any excess taxes.

One excellent way to choose the best structure for your company is to meet with your Houston business law attorney. The two of you can discuss all that you might gain (or lose) by starting your company as either an LLC (limited liability company) or an “S” corporation.

Before noting some of the basic steps involved with forming an LLC and an “S” corporation, here’s a brief overview of the unique offerings and drawbacks of both structures.

What are some chief advantages and drawbacks of starting an LLC?

Depending on the size of your business and the types of goods or services you’re selling, you may prefer an LLC for the following reasons.

  • It offers a less formal structure. An “LLC” is also often easier to manage than an “S” corporation, especially when you have few employees. And you’ll never need to have any board meetings to tackle problems tied to issuing stock certificates;
  • You can readily change this business structure (once all proper paperwork is filed). If

you’re running an “S’ corporation, you’ll first have to arrange a formal board meeting before trying to change the business structure);

  • All members of an “LLC” do not have to be permanent residents or U. S. citizens;
  • You can more easily divide up who handles most of the daily work – while allowing others to just be investors. You can also simply divide up the profits based on each person’s initial investment and daily work contributions;
  • Disadvantages of an “LLC” compared to an “S” corporation. These can include having all the company profits subjected to self-employment taxes. Your growth may be limited since your business cannot issue any stock shares. Always ask your Houston business law attorney about any other potential disadvantages that may apply to your unique situation.

Why do some entrepreneurs prefer forming “S” corporations – despite the limitations?

  • Formality is viewed more favorably by some. Outside businesses often prefer interacting with companies that employ a more formal corporate structure;
  • You can often use this structure to avoid double taxation of income;
  • Profits are passed on to the shareholders (by way of their paid dividends). Therefore, the company does not have to pay taxes on those profits;
  • Possible drawbacks. All shareholders must be permanent residents or U.S. citizens. There can be no more than 100 shareholders. Added state filing fees may apply. Also, the IRS

tends to monitor “S” corporations very closely since some people try to improperly avoid certain taxes by wrongfully using this business structure.

What are some basic issues that must be addressed while forming an “LLC” in Texas?

  • Membership. You’ll need to decide how many owners or members you’ll have and if they’ll share all the managerial duties;
  • Naming your business. You must choose a unique name to avoid confusion with already existing companies;
  • File all required forms. You’ll need to start with a certificate of formation (Form 205) that must be filed with the Texas Secretary of State’s Office;
  • Registered agent. You must name a registered agent who can accept the service of process on behalf of your company;
  • You’ll need to create an operating agreement. It’s usually best to ask your Houston business law attorney to draft this document for you after you’ve

discussed the precise nature of your new business;

  • Fully satisfy all state and federal paperwork requirements;
  • Obtain all required state and local business licenses that may be required for your industry.

(Note: Some of these same steps may also be required while forming an “S” corporation below, regardless of whether they’re listed).

Here’s a brief review of key issues involved in starting an “S” corporation in Texas

  • The drafting of Articles of Incorporation. These must be filed with the Texas Secretary of State’s Office;
  • Stock certificates must be issued to all initial shareholders;
  • All applicable business licenses and certificates must be obtained in a timely manner;
  • You’ll need to file Form 2553 with the Internal Revenue Service. (Your lawyer can first check to be sure you meet all the qualifying terms for creating an “S” corporation).

Please feel free to contact one of our Murray Lobb lawyers so we can answer your questions about each of these business structures. We can also help you draft all the documents you’ll need to transact business throughout the year.

Many People Start New Businesses After Age 50

A large percentage of Americans launch new companies and careers after turning fifty. In fact, the term “encore entrepreneurs” has been coined to describe this steady trend. In her book, “Your Life Calling: Reimagining the Rest of Your Life,” Jane Pauley profiles some rather amazing people who’ve transformed their “retirement years.” Many of them are now realizing personal dreams that are helping others both locally and in distant parts of the world.

In a recent New York Times article addressing this topic, one man in his early sixties said that he’s so happy with his new company (which creates educational and training videos) that he may never retire. Fortunately, many larger cities often have “incubators” designed to help people get new companies off the ground — and venture capitalists who are eager to consider funding start-ups with a strong likelihood of success.

Texas remains a great state for new businesses

Every year, many media outlets rank multiple Texas cities as great places to design and build new companies. Be sure to review our Texas governor’s office publication entitled “Texas Business Incubators.”

Once you’ve got a great idea for starting a business, consider scheduling an appointment with your experienced Houston business law attorney to obtain the valuable legal advice you’ll need.

Here are some additional facts and figures that can provide useful insights into some of the best fields to enter (and others to avoid) as you move forward with getting your new company up and running.

Facts and statistics about older Americans starting new companies & becoming self-employed

  • Fifty-one percent (51%) of new start-up business owners are between the ages of 50 and 88. In fact, those aged 35-49 only start about 33% of new companies — and those age 35 or younger only form about 16% of them. Fortunately, you don’t often need a lot of money to get a new company off the ground. Many older entrepreneurs start their companies with $2,000 or less.
  • The Dallas Morning News reports that during each month in 2017, roughly 400 out of every 100,000 Texans became entrepreneurs. A large percentage of those individuals were seniors. Many of their businesses were formed in Austin, Dallas and Houston.
  • About 80% of new Texas business entrepreneurs start their businesses based upon immediately available opportunities – rather than the simple need to find work.
  • Between the year 2000 and 2016, the number of self-employed New Yorkers rose by 63.7 percent. While the country’s economic downturn back around 2008 certainly influenced that trend, it clearly isn’t the sole or main force behind it.
  • About 69% of Americans start their businesses at home.
  • Roughly 42% of all new businesses are formed as S-corporations and 23% are LLCs. Of course, a very large number of small businesses are simply run by solo entrepreneurs.

Which types of new businesses tend to succeed the most often?

  • Those offering insurance, real estate or financial services. After four years, about 58% of these are usually still viable.  Businesses in the financial realm often offer tax preparation, bookkeeping or payroll services.
  • Companies renting or leasing automotive equipment.
  • Legal service businesses.
  • Medical, dental and other healthcare services.
  • Religious organizations.
  • Specific types of administrative or company management services.

Types of new businesses that frequently fail sooner than others

  • Stores selling beer, wine and liquor
  • Auto dealerships
  • Oil and gas extraction service companies
  • Grocery stores
  • Beverage manufacturers
  • Furniture stores
  • Companies selling lawn and garden equipment

After going over your business plans with trusted family members or friends, consider reading more about the different types of business structures you can choose from and what’s normally involved with starting a new Texas company.

Hopefully, you’ll decide to join the many other Texans who’ve discovered that running a business when you’re older can be a very gratifying experience – one that can add even greater purpose to your life.

Our law firm invites adults of every age to contact one of our Murray Lobb attorneys for legal advice when either starting a new business – or simply needed help with one that’s already thriving.

Purchasing a Texas Franchise or Company Already in Business

Since only about twenty percent (20%) of new businesses survive past their first year, many savvy entrepreneurs prefer to buy a company or franchise that’s already up and running. That often proves wise – if the purchaser is willing to complete all the necessary research to make sure the current signs of financial success aren’t threatened by factors that no one is willing to disclose.

To make sure you handle all crucial due diligence inquiries properly, consider asking your experienced Houston business lawyers for the help and insights they can readily offer as you explore all the possible investment risks.

Once you’ve carefully answered the following questions — and analyzed the various concerns mentioned — you should be better prepared to decide whether to purchase a specific business or franchise.

Important business questions to answer – and key concerns to evaluate

  1. Is the product or service a good match for your interests and experience? People are often most successful when they feel passionate about the business they’re running. Should you be entering a field that’s unfamiliar to you, be prepared to hire different consultants as needed. Of course, if you’re buying into a franchise, the corporate headquarters will usually offer valuable training and products to help you;
  2. Why is the business for sale now? Is the current owner truly planning to retire or move closer to family across the country? Ask the current owner very direct questions. If you’re trying to buy a franchise, you’ll need to obtain a copy of the Franchise Disclosure Document. (This was formerly known as the Uniform Franchise Offering Circular or UFOC). It will fully inform you about a franchise’s financial, legal and personnel history;
  3. What business location is best for you? Be sure to ask the current owner to provide you with a breakdown of the business’ most regular customers. Are they residents of nearby neighborhoods — or simply commuters who work in the area? What types of seasonal downturns, if any, should you expect in business profits? Be ready to purchase zip code-based demographic reports that can provide you with information about your current customer base. There are also different types of geographic-information-system software programs that can help you evaluate consumer trends tied to local neighborhoods and the most recent census. (Always be sure your business location can offer adequate parking);
  4. Do you have adequate financial knowledge and good funding sources for your purchase? Be sure to have your Houston attorney review all the general business or franchise contracts tendered to you. Only work with a trustworthy financial consultant who can help you review each company’s current operating expenses. Also, obtain the help of a qualified lender you’ve dealt with in the past – or someone who comes highly recommended by business contacts you’ve known for years;
  5. Determine if you’re personally willing to take a “hands-on” approach to running the franchise or business. Be prepared to pay good wages to any managers you must hire. Good ones can “make or break” a successful franchise – or any other type of business. Be sure to tell any impressive managers and employees you meet that you may keep many current staff members on in the future – once you’ve reviewed all employee files;
  6. Be sure to personally observe the current quality of customer service. Ask about the specific training that helped produce the successful parts of it. Be prepared to provide an employee orientation and training program that honestly promises good wages and job benefits so employees will know how important they are to you;
  7. Network with similar local business owners and managers in the area. If necessary, consider taking one or more of them to lunch or dinner so you can pose insightful questions about their most difficult daily challenges doing business in the area;
  8. Find out what types of marketing plans are currently in place and if you can expect any corporate support in this regard. If you aren’t buying a franchise, contact the nearest small business administration (SBA) office to see what types of marketing and business planning programs they can offer to you;
  9. Plan on developing some type of regular community “presence” that can benefit everyone. This may take the form of financially sponsoring one or two local children’s sports teams. When you pay for the equipment and help secure uniforms – often emblazoned with your company name or logo — everyone will likely benefit;
  10. After you’ve completed all due diligence inquiries, visit pertinent local government offices. Check to see what types of new building permits have been issued – and find out if any new zoning changes will soon be enforced that could negatively affect the business you’re hoping to purchase.

Finally, read all you can about what has helped so many successful businesses and franchises remain profitable over recent decades. The more you learn about each of these companies, the more likely you’ll be to succeed in running your own franchise or new company.

At Murray Lobb, we’re always ready to help clients who may soon buy an operating business or franchise. We can guide you through all the detailed due diligence inquiries – and draft all the contracts and other documents you’ll need.

Key Traits New Business Partners Must Readily Offer

Although only 20% of new businesses fail during their first year, roughly half of them cease operations during their first five years. Frequently, the biggest problems develop because the founders failed to choose the best group of partners available to start the company.

Each potential business partner’s personality traits, ethical values, passion and proven skills must be carefully evaluated. Only then can everyone work hard together to define and establish high performance standards while carefully marketing the company’s goods and services to the public.

Here’s a general overview of the partner skills and traits that some business experts believe can provide a new company with a strong chance to succeed for many years to come.

Top skills and traits your partners must have and be willing to share with each other

  1. Trustworthiness, discretion and moral integrity. In addition to partners whose references say they’re definitely trustworthy– you also need people who have an innate need to treat others fairly and want to act as good role models for ethical business behavior;
  2. Keen intelligence and a proven track record of success. Ask all potential partners about their past business successes and failures. Find out if they have truly learned from all past experiences. The crucible of the workplace often provides the best measure of a potential partner’s ability to succeed in a new business venture. Look for highly intelligent partners who can readily respect other people’s creativity — while still bringing their own fresh, original ideas to the table;
  3. Able to maintain a consistently positive, “can do” attitude. Nothing can bring a business to its knees quicker than one or two partners who keep forecasting doom. Be sure each person will remain actively involved in all key company decisions and “go the extra mile” without being asked to do so on many occasions;
  4. Able to display strong, supportive communication skills. All companies need strong communicators who can create proper standards for respectfully interacting with others. These standards must apply to all in-person meetings, phone conversations, the exchange of emails and the use of social media. Each partner must also clearly communicate his or her support for others within the company;
  5. Can offer unique skills that help balance out those offered by the other partners. In addition to someone who can handle complex accounting matters, you’ll also need partners who are strong planners, innovative geniuses, marketing wizards and product (and service) development experts. You’ll also need at least one partner who maintains strong connections to industry experts who can provide your company with timely advice, crucial consultants and other contacts over the years;
  6. Can remain open-minded and is willing to constructively resolve conflicts with others. Always learn all you can about each potential new partner’s openness to the ideas of others and ability to compromise on matters. Also try to evaluate the person’s mature ability to acknowledge personal mistakes – and learn from them. You don’t need any partners who constantly try and prove themselves “right” about everything;
  7. Has the ability to handle different levels of risk and uncertainty. This may be the hardest trait of all to discern – but it’s well worth finding out if someone can remain fully productive – even when unexpected business challenges arise. Always ask about past business difficulties and how the partner candidate personally responded to them. Resilience in the face of change is a key trait of all successful business partners.

Once you’ve selected all your partners, you’ll need to meet with your Houston business lawyer to draw up a partnership agreement that clearly addresses such matters as each person’s roles and responsibilities, how (and when) everyone will be compensated – and how the company must respond when anyone chooses to leave the partnership.

Please contact our Murray Lobb office so we can provide you with the guidance you’ll need when forming any new business. Our firm’s lengthy experience working with professionals in numerous fields allows us to provide you with the help you’ll need.