Unintentional Partnership in Texas

Question: Can two or more persons create a partnership even though they did not intend to do so?

Answer: Yes, under certain circumstances.

   Generally, under Texas law an association of two or more persons to carry on a business for profit as owners creates a partnership, regardless of whether (1) the persons intend to create a partnership, or (2) the association is called a “partnership”, “joint venture”, or other name.  Partnerships are governed by Chapter 152 of the Texas Business Organizations Code.

   What this means is that two or more people could in fact cause the creation of a partnership even though they did not intend on doing so.  The consequences of being partners is the fiduciary duty which arises between partners. The Texas Business Organizations Code also sets forth factors indicating that persons have created a partnership. These factors include:

(1) Receipt or right to receive a share of profits of the business;

(2) Expression of an intent to be partners in the business;

(3) Participation or right to participate in control of the business;

(4) Agreement to share or sharing:

       (A) losses of the business; or

       (B) liability for claims by third parties against the business; and

(5) Agreement to contribute or contributing money or property to the business.

Interestingly, an agreement by the owners of a business to share losses is not necessary to create a partnership.

   On January 31, 2020, the Texas Supreme Court held that parties can conclusively negate the formation of a partnership under Chapter 152 of the Texas Business Organizations Code through contractual conditions precedent. The condition precedent was that the “venture” would not come into effect until the respective parties’ board of directors approved the deal.  The boards of the companies never approved the venture and thus that one provision saved one of the parties almost half a billion dollars:

Texas Supreme Court upholds Court of Appeals reversal of FIVE-HUNDRED-MILLION-DOLLAR trial court verdict. In Energy Transfer v. Enterprise, the high court dealt with a clause that contained conditions precedent to forming a partnership. Enterprise and Energy Transfer, two of the top ten largest energy companies in the United States, sought to re-purpose an existing pipeline or build a new one to transfer crude oil south as opposed to north. The two companies expressly rejected creating a partnership until two conditions precedent were met: 1) execution of definitive agreements memorializing the terms and conditions of the pipeline transaction that 2) received approval from each party’s board of directors. Subsequently, when the companies failed to get shipping commitments to cover the potential costs of the pipeline, Enterprise ended talks with Energy Transfer. Enterprise would eventually go into business with ConocoPhillips. Energy Transfer, believing Enterprise and Energy Transfer entered into a partnership agreement, sued Enterprise claiming breach of fiduciary duty. (Fiduciary duty is putting the wellbeing and interest of the person for whom they are responsible above their individual interests; the duty commands exceptional loyalty of the party owing a fiduciary duty.) The trial court awarded Energy Transfer damages totaling $535,794,777.40. Enterprise appealed, and the Court of Appeals reversed the trial court’s ruling and found for Enterprise. As a result, Energy Transfer filed for review with the Texas Supreme Court. Enterprise continued to argue no fiduciary duty existed because no partnership was entered into between the parties. The Texas Supreme Court agreed. The Court, applying long-standing freedom to contract law, held that parties could require conditions precedent to the formation of a partnership notwithstanding the Texas Business Organizations Code’s five factor partnership test.

   It is the general rule that when an agreement provides a condition precedent to the formation of a partnership, it will not come into existence until the condition has been met. However, such condition precedent may be waived and, if the parties actually proceed with the business, they may be held as partners even though the condition precedent has not been satisfied.

   Chapter 152 is not the sole source of rules for determining partnership formation. The determination of formation of a partnership should “include” the five factors listed in the section. Those factors are not exclusive. Principles of law and equity supplement the statutory partnership provisions unless otherwise provided by this chapter or the other partnership provisions.

What should persons do when looking into a business venture?

   First, the parties should enter into a written agreement, which can be informal, clearly stating that the parties are contemplating a business venture, or exploring the feasibility of a business venture; and that despite negotiations with third parties, expenditures of funds towards investigating the venture, reimbursement or sharing of expenses between the parties, no partnership shall be created “unless …….” (clearly and specifically stated).

   That “unless” is the condition precedent.  The condition can be approval of a formal agreement by the board of directors of corporations, by the manager or managers of an LLC, or the signed agreement for the formation of a partnership.  The condition could be the enactment of a trade agreement with another country, or even a minimum price making up the subject matter of the venture, such as the price per bushel of corn must be “$$$” before any business venture shall be formed, or as simple as requiring the respective wives of the parties to approve the venture in writing.

   Make sure oral agreements are disclaimed and a provision that the parties disclaim any reliance upon any representation made by, or information supplied by, the other party, and waives any claims for fraudulent inducement.

Should you need help understanding the laws surrounding General Partnerships, please contact one of our Murray-Lobb Attorneys.

Steps Required to Dissolve a General Partnership in Texas

Steps Required to Dissolve a General Partnership in Texas

Even when business partners get along well with each other and succeed, a time may come when they may develop new interests, decide to retire or move elsewhere for business or pleasure reasons. While the Internet and modern communications make it possible to still run businesses with partners scattered around the globe, it’s still quite common for partnerships to break apart or take on new members when others leave.

Do You Need a Written Partnership Agreement in Texas?

Normally, Texas law doesn’t require general (or “at-will”) partnerships to create a written partnership agreement. However, it’s always best to draft one so that when the entity breaks apart (or any partner leaves), you’ll know exactly how to pay off all partnership debts and distribute the remaining assets among everyone.

When general partnerships don’t have an agreement, then Texas law expects the partners to govern their “wind-up” activities in keeping with our state’s default partnership laws.

Here’s a broad overview of the tasks that you and your partners must handle as you dissolve your partnership. Should you have any questions at this early stage, it’s always wise to schedule an appointment with your Houston business law attorney.

First Steps to Take When Preparing to Dissolve Your Partnership

Schedule a meeting so everyone can discuss how your written partnership agreement requires you to dissolve the partnership. During this meeting, you must take a vote to determine if all parties still holding majority rights (or financial interests equal to or greater than 50% of the partnership assets) favor dissolving it. Next, ask this same majority to vote whether they’re ready to draft and sign a written resolution stating that the partnership will now wind up all its affairs and be dissolved.

At this point, all partners who want to keep working together under a new partnership agreement can indicate this desire to everyone else – and offer to buy-out the partnership shares of those who are leaving.

Handling Debt Payments and Winding Up All Remaining Matters

Every current partner should expressly agree to complete certain tasks approved by all those winding down the partnership’s affairs – and to refrain from negotiating any new business that could potentially obligate all partners after the dissolution.

As referenced above, those leaving the partnership are free to sell their shares in it to others, in keeping with their original partnership agreement (or the state’s laws governing such transactions when there is no written agreement). To help the partnership pay off existing debts, all partners can vote on which current partnership assets (if any) may be sold for cash.

The laws governing the pay-off of all partnership debts are set forth in our state’s Uniform Partnership Act. It basically states that you must pay off all your creditors first – before paying back each partner for all past capital contributions to the partnership.

Are There Any Remaining Wind-Up Steps You Must Address?

  • Paperwork filing with the state. In Texas, there’s no need to file anything when dissolving an at-will (general) partnership;
  • Providing notice to all creditors, customers and other parties. It’s customary to send out notices through the mail to all your business contacts so they’ll know that your partnership is being dissolved as of a certain date. However, there’s no law which requires this to be done. You can also just simply publish a notice about the dissolution in your local newspaper;
  • Updating all out-of-state registrations. To prevent your partnership from owing any more fees to other states where you’ve registered for the right to do business, you need to formally notify the correct offices via certified mail that you’re dissolving your partnership;
  • Paying all taxes that are owed. Although Texas doesn’t require you to obtain a tax clearance before winding-up your partnership, you must make sure all taxes owed have been paid before dissolving it. This step includes filing a final federal tax return for your partnership in keeping with Texas law.

Should you have any specific questions about dissolving your partnership – or making sure that you’re handling all tax matters properly – please contact our law firm so we can provide you with all pertinent legal advice.