Q & A: Job Accomodations Often Requested by Disabled Workers

Like most Americans, people living with chronic disabilities know that their best physical and mental health is often easiest to maintain when they’re doing meaningful work. Yet despite their strong work ethic – many of the disabled must still combat negative stereotypes that often don’t match the excellent work they do.

Fortunately, the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) made it illegal for employers to discriminate against job applicants with known disabilities. The ADA applies to all employers with 15 or more employees and to all state and local government employers. The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) enforces all the provisions of the ADA.

Once employers become aware of the untapped talents and skills of the disabled, they still hesitate to hire people because they’re concerned about the “reasonable accommodations” they may need to make to help disabled workers function at their full capacity. However, most of the time, the special requests made by the disabled are relatively simple to handle.

Here’s a brief look at some of the questions employers often ask about properly honoring all the ADA’s provisions in the workplace.

Frequently asked questions concerning the Americans with Disabilities Act

Q:  What exactly constitutes a “disability” under this law?

A:  A job applicant’s disability is normally covered by the ADA if it involves a mental or physical impairment that substantially interferes with (or limits) an individual’s ability to handle a major activity like work.

Q:  Can my company require a job applicant to undergo a medical exam before extending a job offer?

A:  Generally, no. However, you can make a job offer that’s conditional, based on a satisfactory result of a post-offer medical exam (or inquiry) that’s required of all new employees entering in the same job category. Under certain circumstances, always best discussed in advance with your Houston employment law attorney, you can ask an applicant who has disclosed that s/he has a disability to either demonstrate the ability to perform the job’s required tasks – or at least describe how s/he will handle them due to the disability.

Q:  What constitutes a “reasonable accommodation?”

A:   Employers sometimes need to adjust or modify certain aspects of the job application process and how a job is performed so that a disabled person can readily enjoy the same rights and privileges extended to others without disabilities.

Q:  Do we have to grant preference to a disabled applicant over someone who is not disabled?

A:  No. One of the clearest examples provided by one source refers to a job where the employees may need to type rather fast. If the disabled job applicant’s best typing score (after being provided with appropriate testing accommodations) is only 50 wpm and a non-disabled applicant can type 75 wpm, the employer is completely free to hire the faster typist. Again, this holds true if fast typing skills are crucial to the job;

Q:  Can you provide concrete examples of reasonable accommodations that employers might need to provide?

A:  Yes. A sample list follows.

  1. You may need to modify how someone takes a qualifying exam, completes a training program or handles limited aspects of the job once hired. For example, a person with limited use of his hands may require special software that lets him dictate most of his work instead of typing it;
  2. You may have to honor certain lifting limitations or a requirement that someone remain seated in a regular chair most of the day. Depending on the disabled person’s special needs, particularly if she’s suffering from a spinal cord injury, you may need to provide an ergonomically correct chair. Of course, employers can object to some requests, if they can prove that purchasing the required equipment would likely impose an undue hardship on them;
  3. It may be necessary to allow a disabled person to work from home. Some disabled people need to work in either extremely high- or low-light environments. Others may need to telecommute so they can readily take certain medications — or periodically change, adjust or empty various medical devices they must wear. Still other employees may need to lie down and periodically rest their bodies due to various spinal cord or traumatic brain injuries that make sitting upright for lengthy periods of time too compromising or painful.

Please note that regardless of whether the disabled employee works at home or in a company’s office, no employer is required to lower their standards for the quality of work being done – nor lower their overall production standards;

  1. It may help to change an employee’s work schedule. This can help the disabled person perform the required tasks at a time of day or night that may be much more conducive for doing his/her best work;
  2. You may need to make special scheduling adjustments to help an employee with a known psychiatric or mental health impairment. This might include excusing the person from working rotating shifts; allowing the individual to take extra time to rest during the lunch hour — and making sure the employee has a work schedule that allows for regular therapy appointments during the day;
  3. It may be necessary to provide a TTY (text telephone) system to a worker who has suffered a significant hearing loss that’s been formally recognized as a disability;
  4. You may need to authorize a short-term leave from the job. This type of disability request will always revolve around special circumstances. For example, if a worker and his/her doctor both believe that such a leave is necessary to help improve the person’s health and ability to work, this might be useful. However, employers are not required to bear undue hardships and disrupt overall workflow by leaving critical positions unfilled for lengthy periods of time.

As all this material indicates, meeting ADA standards is usually a straightforward process. Odds are, you’ll soon discover that hiring disabled employees is a smart move since they’re normally highly qualified and eager to succeed.

Please feel free to contact one of our Murray Lobb attorneys so we can assist you as you try to conform with all the ADA’s provisions – while also creating a pleasant job atmosphere for all your employees.

Purchasing a Texas Franchise or Company Already in Business

Since only about twenty percent (20%) of new businesses survive past their first year, many savvy entrepreneurs prefer to buy a company or franchise that’s already up and running. That often proves wise – if the purchaser is willing to complete all the necessary research to make sure the current signs of financial success aren’t threatened by factors that no one is willing to disclose.

To make sure you handle all crucial due diligence inquiries properly, consider asking your experienced Houston business lawyers for the help and insights they can readily offer as you explore all the possible investment risks.

Once you’ve carefully answered the following questions — and analyzed the various concerns mentioned — you should be better prepared to decide whether to purchase a specific business or franchise.

Important business questions to answer – and key concerns to evaluate

  1. Is the product or service a good match for your interests and experience? People are often most successful when they feel passionate about the business they’re running. Should you be entering a field that’s unfamiliar to you, be prepared to hire different consultants as needed. Of course, if you’re buying into a franchise, the corporate headquarters will usually offer valuable training and products to help you;
  2. Why is the business for sale now? Is the current owner truly planning to retire or move closer to family across the country? Ask the current owner very direct questions. If you’re trying to buy a franchise, you’ll need to obtain a copy of the Franchise Disclosure Document. (This was formerly known as the Uniform Franchise Offering Circular or UFOC). It will fully inform you about a franchise’s financial, legal and personnel history;
  3. What business location is best for you? Be sure to ask the current owner to provide you with a breakdown of the business’ most regular customers. Are they residents of nearby neighborhoods — or simply commuters who work in the area? What types of seasonal downturns, if any, should you expect in business profits? Be ready to purchase zip code-based demographic reports that can provide you with information about your current customer base. There are also different types of geographic-information-system software programs that can help you evaluate consumer trends tied to local neighborhoods and the most recent census. (Always be sure your business location can offer adequate parking);
  4. Do you have adequate financial knowledge and good funding sources for your purchase? Be sure to have your Houston attorney review all the general business or franchise contracts tendered to you. Only work with a trustworthy financial consultant who can help you review each company’s current operating expenses. Also, obtain the help of a qualified lender you’ve dealt with in the past – or someone who comes highly recommended by business contacts you’ve known for years;
  5. Determine if you’re personally willing to take a “hands-on” approach to running the franchise or business. Be prepared to pay good wages to any managers you must hire. Good ones can “make or break” a successful franchise – or any other type of business. Be sure to tell any impressive managers and employees you meet that you may keep many current staff members on in the future – once you’ve reviewed all employee files;
  6. Be sure to personally observe the current quality of customer service. Ask about the specific training that helped produce the successful parts of it. Be prepared to provide an employee orientation and training program that honestly promises good wages and job benefits so employees will know how important they are to you;
  7. Network with similar local business owners and managers in the area. If necessary, consider taking one or more of them to lunch or dinner so you can pose insightful questions about their most difficult daily challenges doing business in the area;
  8. Find out what types of marketing plans are currently in place and if you can expect any corporate support in this regard. If you aren’t buying a franchise, contact the nearest small business administration (SBA) office to see what types of marketing and business planning programs they can offer to you;
  9. Plan on developing some type of regular community “presence” that can benefit everyone. This may take the form of financially sponsoring one or two local children’s sports teams. When you pay for the equipment and help secure uniforms – often emblazoned with your company name or logo — everyone will likely benefit;
  10. After you’ve completed all due diligence inquiries, visit pertinent local government offices. Check to see what types of new building permits have been issued – and find out if any new zoning changes will soon be enforced that could negatively affect the business you’re hoping to purchase.

Finally, read all you can about what has helped so many successful businesses and franchises remain profitable over recent decades. The more you learn about each of these companies, the more likely you’ll be to succeed in running your own franchise or new company.

At Murray Lobb, we’re always ready to help clients who may soon buy an operating business or franchise. We can guide you through all the detailed due diligence inquiries – and draft all the contracts and other documents you’ll need.

Administering the Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA)

Prior to the passage of the FMLA in 1993, American workers had few options when they needed extra time off from work due to their own serious medical conditions and accidents – or those of immediate family members. In fact, workers often had to use up all their vacation and sick leave benefits, if entitled to any, and then worry about their job security if they needed more time off. (However, eligible women could seek the special help offered by the 1978 Pregnancy Discrimination Act). 

Fortunately, the Family Medical Leave Act is still helping many 21st century workers address critical family caregiving duties and remains one of the signature pieces of legislation from the Clinton era.

Here’s a brief overview of specific provisions of the act that can help your qualified workers.

What basic opportunities does the FMLA offer qualified employees?

If a worker meets the minimum qualifications referenced below, it’s possible to take up to twelve (12) weeks of unpaid leave during a calendar year to take care of seriously ill family members, new children or the individual’s own major medical condition.

In 2008, the Family Medical Leave Act was updated so that qualified workers could also take time off work to take care of immediate family members who became very ill (or were seriously injured) while serving in the military.

The FMLA guarantees that qualified workers can take the extended time off work without having to worry about losing their jobs, their seniority or their employer-provided health care insurance.

Which types of employees are qualified to use the FMLA?

  • Those who have employers with 50 or more workers on the payroll for at least 20 workweeks during the preceding or current calendar year. A worker may still qualify even if all the 50 workers aren’t working at the same site – if they work within a 75-mile radius of one another;
  • Those who have worked for their employer for a minimum of 12 months, for a total of at least 1,250 hours. This means that many part-time workers may not qualify for FMLA leave. However, there are special rules that may apply to workers who are teachers, are highly paid – or are flight crew members of airlines;
  • Employees taking time off from jobs to handle their own “serious health conditions” – or those of covered family members. This time may also be used to take care of a new child or a servicemember in the immediate family who has been wounded.

Note:  Now that same-sex marriage is legal in all 50 states, LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender) individuals can also qualify like other workers to take care of their family members.

General questions often raised about the FMLA by employers and employees

Question 1:   Can the leave time requested be intermittent during a calendar year?

Answer 1:     Yes, if all the time that’s taken is counted toward the maximum amount of time off

                     allowed (12 weeks).

Question 2:  What government agency oversees and administers the FMLA for all federal

                     employees – as well as all state and local government workers and private

                     employees?

Answer 2:   The U. S. Department of Labor’s Wage and Hour Division. This is noted in Fact

                   Sheet #77B entitled, “Protection for Individuals Under the FMLA.”

Question 3: Are all workers qualified to take time off from their jobs under the FMLA entitled

                     to receive pay while away from work?

Answer 3:    No. The FMLA doesn’t require employers to pay qualified employees while they’re

                    taking this type of leave. However, it’s up to your employer to let you make a claim

                    for regular vacation time, sick leave or annual time off.

Question 4: Can a qualified worker ever be granted more than 12 weeks of paid or unpaid

                     FMLA leave in one year?

Answer 4:   An exception only exists for qualified family caregivers of wounded

                    servicemembers. They’re allowed to take up to 26 weeks off from their jobs in a

                    given calendar year.

Question 5: Can a qualified worker request more than 12 weeks off under the FMLA to take care

                    of a newborn – or a newly adopted child?

Answer 5:   In general, the answer is “No.” However, individual states can pass their own

                   versions of the FMLA and provide somewhat different benefits. To date, the Texas

                   Workforce Commission says that Texas has not passed such legislation.

Although the Family Medical Leave Act is a straightforward piece of legislation, it’s been updated with new rules and regulations and interpreted by the courts. Therefore, it’s usually wise for employers to ask their Houston employment lawyer for help if they have any specific questions about properly handling FMLA issues.

Please feel free to contact Murray Lobb so we can help explain any specific aspects of the FMLA to you as you provide its benefits to your employees. We’re always available to research any questions you may have.