Shareholder Agreements Require Flexible Buy-Sell Provisions

There are many reasons why shareholders in closely-held corporations may need to quickly sell their shares to others. Therefore, it’s important when drafting a shareholder’s agreement to cover every basic aspect of buying and selling shares – in addition to the general administrative matters that must normally be addressed.

Depending on a corporation’s number of major shareholders and business pursuits, a flexible framework helps facilitate every goal. The following list sets forth some of the main terms that shareholder agreements should cover, separate and apart from the buy-sell provisions that will be discussed in greater detail below.

Common Administrative Topics Set Forth in Many Shareholder Agreements

  • Voting rights. Always describe each shareholder’s voting rights and when they can be properly exercised;
  • Qualifications for serving as corporate officers. Basic requirements must be stated so that only fully qualified individuals can serve as corporate officers at any level;
  • Noncompete provisions. All parties involved with a corporation must agree to avoid compromising its trade secrets or later leaving and then trying to compete for its clients for a limited time;
  • Preferred groups to consult with when internal disputes must be resolved. Include the names of specific mediation or dispute resolution services that can be contacted and how the corporation should decide when such outside help is required;
  • Inclusion of anti-dilution provisions to protect stock values;
  • A description of major shareholders’ “tag-along” rights;
  • Registration rights must be explained and how they apply to certain restricted stocks;
  • Stock valuation procedures must be described and closely followed.

Once these and other crucial topics have been covered, you and your Houston corporate law attorney should discuss the best buy-sell provisions suited to your corporate structure.

Basic Buy-Sell Provisions – Events That Often Trigger Their Use

Your shareholder’s agreement should always include a very detailed explanation of how shares should be sold when one of the following events takes place.

  • The death of a shareholder;
  • The termination of an employee shareholder – whether “for cause” or without cause;
  • The disability of a shareholder;
  • A shareholder’s retirement

When trying to draft the best buy-sell procedures to address these situations, it’s often wise to sit down and review your corporation’s main concerns and interests with your lawyer.

Should the Selling of Shares Be Mandatory — or Provide Parties with Greater Choice?

When trying to answer this question, you may want to provide different answers, depending on whether the sales are to the corporation itself, other shareholders – or to third parties.

  1. Should your corporation be given the first right to purchase (or redeem) the stocks? If you and the controlling officers of your corporation wish to include this provision in your shareholder agreement, be sure to first consider the possible capital gains tax issues involved;
  2. Do you want to automatically offer the available shares to other general shareholders if the corporation isn’t interested in redeeming the shares after a set deadline? If so, it’s important to indicate if majority shareholders will have the first opportunity to buy the shares;
  3. Are you willing to allow outside third parties to buy the newly available shares? If so, you must decide in advance the types of criteria that such buyers must meet.

Other Key Issues Involved with Drafting Your Buy-Sell Provisions

  1. Setting the proper price to be paid for the stocks. In general, if the available shares are to be purchased by the corporation or one of its current shareholders, you should have already created a clear formula in your shareholder’s agreement for determining the current, proper valuation of the stock. However, if the shares are to be sold to an outside third party, that outsider’s offer will normally be determined by the current market price for the type of shares involved;
  2. How should the price be paid? Most corporations will benefit from establishing a basic buyout procedure within its shareholder agreement so that these common transactions can be handled according in a very clear, pre-determined manner. Since lump-sum payments are usually not preferred, you will need to decide if you prefer such options as:
  1. A buyer-financed buyout
  2. A seller-financed buyout, or
  3. Some type of financing arrangement involving insurance or a trust

Since a corporation’s success is often determined by the terms and quality of its shareholder’s agreement, please feel free to contact our firm so we can provide you with our general legal advice or help you draft a new agreement. 

Some Pros and Cons of Having an Adult Guardian Appointed

While most middle-aged and older adults recognize their need for a Will and a basic estate plan, far fewer understand when it may (or may not) be in their best interest to have a formal guardian appointed to help them manage all their personal and financial (estate) decisions. In general, if you’re still capable of making fully competent decisions regarding your finances, basic living arrangements, and medical care needs, you probably don’t need a guardian appointed for you.

However, if you’re currently suffering from some form of mental incapacity or dementia that impairs your ability to handle such matters, then you may need to have a guardian appointed to help you manage your affairs (either temporarily or permanently).

This article first reviews some of the dangers that can occur when the wrong person becomes your guardian and then lists the various legal documents that can help all adults provide for their general medical, financial, and everyday needs should they unexpectedly become very ill or need extensive medical treatment.

Can Courts Abruptly Take Away Elderly People’s Rights to Live as They Choose?

The New Yorker magazine recently published an article in October 2017 entitled, “How the Elderly Lose Their Rights.” It details the real-life experience of many seniors who suddenly found themselves under the control of a “questionable” court-appointed guardian in Clark County, Nevada. In some cases, these older Americans were in regular contact with family members – when a local court guardian decided that they could no longer live on their own and required her overbearing control of their lives.

In some instances, all it took was a hired home healthcare aide’s statement that the elderly person could no longer properly care for himself or his spouse, even though appropriate outside care had obviously been employed for such purposes. One court guardian (who’s been indicted for her actions), would simply arrive at an elderly person’s apartment or senior care facility and announce that she had just gotten herself appointed as that person’s (or couple’s) legal guardian. That same day, the individuals were then forced to leave where they had been living and go move in where this previously unknown woman directed.

Immediate attempts by family and other outsiders who tried to help proved futile. Instead of the court allowing the elderly to appear in court to respond to concerns about their mental competency, the court allowed a court-appointed, professional guardian to file emergency ex parte petitions indicating that immediate decisions had to be made regarding the seniors’ best interests. One couple’s daughter who tried to help her parents after they suddenly disappeared from their home had to endure various types of character assassination before she finally won their freedom. By that time, all her parent’s finances had been drained – supposedly spent in their best interests.

Sadly, the article also contains the chilling observation that this type of elder abuse has become far too common in many counties across this nation – especially in areas where seniors tend to congregate. Hopefully, more states will follow Nevada’s current plans to soon pass legislation that will expressly give seniors the right to be represented by attorneys during all guardianship competency hearings.

Conclusions

Since no adult ever wants to be suddenly “kidnapped”  or taken somewhere (at any age) by a court-appointed guardian or “professional” — it makes sense for all older adults to have their lawyers provide them with the following critical documents:  an Advance Directive for Medical Care, a Durable Power of Attorney and a Declaration of Guardian in the Event of Later Incapacity or Need of Guardian. By naming someone you know and trust in these documents, it should make it easier for your relatives and friends to help you in a manner that fully comports with your stated preferences should you one day become very ill or incapacitated.

Please contact our law firm if you need to ask any questions about creating an estate plan or having the types of documents referenced in this article prepared for you and other loved ones.