Workplace Evaluations: Skills, Aptitude, Psychological and Lie Detector Tests

Ideally, every job applicant should be fully tested and evaluated before being hired for any position. However, state and federal laws impose certain restraints on the specific types of tests that can be given to job seekers. While skills tests are usually the most critical and widely accepted exams, care must be taken to administer them fairly and accurately.

Here’s a general overview of the types of job applicant rights you must respect while using any of the types of tests referenced above. As will be referenced below, all tests must be given in full compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

Skills and aptitude tests – evaluating clerical, computer software and other job skills

A general rule of thumb that can guide you about many tests is that they must be specific to the types of skills that a job requires on a regular basis. Therefore, it’s usually fine to find out how fast a potential clerical employee can type or how much someone knows about repairing and maintaining computer systems if you’re hiring a computer help desk employee.

While you can usually test most the job skills of the disabled, you may need to make some accommodations in how you administer such tests. Cornell University’s publication entitled, Pre-Employment Testing and the ADAis well worth reviewing to gain a better understanding of job testing requirements. Just keep in mind that certain timed tests may need to provide slightly longer completion times and accommodations may need to be extended to applicants who’ve made their special testing needs known to you, in advance.

Although general aptitude tests can still be given using multiple choice tests, great care must be taken to avoid formats that may mainly reward test-taking skills over a job candidate’s ability to properly handle future job tasks. Short-answer questions based on factual job topics may provide greater insights into a person’s capabilities.

Psychological testing of job applicants

Although some employers still place great value on these types of tests, they are no longer highly favored. Two of the chief reasons that employers are thinking twice about administering these types of tests is that they can sometimes illegally discriminate against certain job applicants or invade their privacy regarding their moral and religious beliefs.

Employers should only administer psychological profile tests that have been scientifically validated, indicating direct correlations with a worker’s job performance. Another potential problem with psychological testing is that the ADA does not allow medically oriented tests to be administered to applicants who are disabled — if it might help discern their disabilities.

In certain situations, the ADA may also require you to revise a psychological or other test if an applicant claims it tests skills related to his/her disability (such as hearing capacity) – that are not regularly required for the job.

Lie detector or “honesty” tests for job applicants and employees

In general, the federal Employee Polygraph Protection Act – with only limited exceptions – prevents employers from requiring job applicants or employees to undergo lie detector tests. While certain types of unique applicants or employees may have to take such tests – including those wanting to provide armored security services (or dispense pharmaceuticals) – restrictions must still be honored as to how such tests are administered and evaluated.

Most of the time, in the few instances when a larger employer might want to administer this type of test, it’s normally only used when there’s reasonable suspicion that an employee may have embezzled from the company or committed other workplace theft.

At present, experts on this topic indicate that it’s nearly always best to restrict the use of any type of “honesty” test to situations where an employee may need to handle cash.

Always remember that in order to protect your company or business from any possible future claims of discrimination, you must make sure that all job applicants take the required tests at the same basic time in the hiring process.

Every employer may want to create a copy of this EEOC document designed to help determine the best job candidates — while fully complying with all federal laws.

Please feel free to contact one of our Murray Lobb lawyers if you need legal advice about administering specific tests to any of your job applicants or employees. We also remain available to discuss any other legal concerns you may have – and can readily draft a wide range of contracts and other documents you may need while conducting daily transactions with your business customers and other parties.

Key Traits New Business Partners Must Readily Offer

Although only 20% of new businesses fail during their first year, roughly half of them cease operations during their first five years. Frequently, the biggest problems develop because the founders failed to choose the best group of partners available to start the company.

Each potential business partner’s personality traits, ethical values, passion and proven skills must be carefully evaluated. Only then can everyone work hard together to define and establish high performance standards while carefully marketing the company’s goods and services to the public.

Here’s a general overview of the partner skills and traits that some business experts believe can provide a new company with a strong chance to succeed for many years to come.

Top skills and traits your partners must have and be willing to share with each other

  1. Trustworthiness, discretion and moral integrity. In addition to partners whose references say they’re definitely trustworthy– you also need people who have an innate need to treat others fairly and want to act as good role models for ethical business behavior;
  2. Keen intelligence and a proven track record of success. Ask all potential partners about their past business successes and failures. Find out if they have truly learned from all past experiences. The crucible of the workplace often provides the best measure of a potential partner’s ability to succeed in a new business venture. Look for highly intelligent partners who can readily respect other people’s creativity — while still bringing their own fresh, original ideas to the table;
  3. Able to maintain a consistently positive, “can do” attitude. Nothing can bring a business to its knees quicker than one or two partners who keep forecasting doom. Be sure each person will remain actively involved in all key company decisions and “go the extra mile” without being asked to do so on many occasions;
  4. Able to display strong, supportive communication skills. All companies need strong communicators who can create proper standards for respectfully interacting with others. These standards must apply to all in-person meetings, phone conversations, the exchange of emails and the use of social media. Each partner must also clearly communicate his or her support for others within the company;
  5. Can offer unique skills that help balance out those offered by the other partners. In addition to someone who can handle complex accounting matters, you’ll also need partners who are strong planners, innovative geniuses, marketing wizards and product (and service) development experts. You’ll also need at least one partner who maintains strong connections to industry experts who can provide your company with timely advice, crucial consultants and other contacts over the years;
  6. Can remain open-minded and is willing to constructively resolve conflicts with others. Always learn all you can about each potential new partner’s openness to the ideas of others and ability to compromise on matters. Also try to evaluate the person’s mature ability to acknowledge personal mistakes – and learn from them. You don’t need any partners who constantly try and prove themselves “right” about everything;
  7. Has the ability to handle different levels of risk and uncertainty. This may be the hardest trait of all to discern – but it’s well worth finding out if someone can remain fully productive – even when unexpected business challenges arise. Always ask about past business difficulties and how the partner candidate personally responded to them. Resilience in the face of change is a key trait of all successful business partners.

Once you’ve selected all your partners, you’ll need to meet with your Houston business lawyer to draw up a partnership agreement that clearly addresses such matters as each person’s roles and responsibilities, how (and when) everyone will be compensated – and how the company must respond when anyone chooses to leave the partnership.

Please contact our Murray Lobb office so we can provide you with the guidance you’ll need when forming any new business. Our firm’s lengthy experience working with professionals in numerous fields allows us to provide you with the help you’ll need.