Inter Vivos Gifts: Transferring Property or Wealth While You’re Still Alive

Stated simply, inter vivos gifts are those given by a donor to a beneficiary during the donor’s lifetime. Many families and individuals enjoy passing property or wealth on to loved ones, friends or charities in this manner. The term “inter vivos” is a Latin one that can be translated as “between living people.”

One of the chief reasons a donor makes this kind of gift is to help a beneficiary avoid paying unnecessary probate taxes after the donor passes away. Another motivation is to give the donor the personal pleasure of seeing the beneficiary enjoy the gift or funds. While other reasons may exist, those are among the most common ones.

The following material reviews some key legal terms you’ll want to know while working with your Houston estate planning attorney. There’s also a list of key factors required for a valid transfer of an inter vivos gift.

Legal terms often used when conveying wealth or property as inter vivos gifts 

  • Donor/grantor. Both these terms are used to describe the person making the inter vivos gift;
  • Beneficiary. The party designated as the recipient of the funds or property;
  • Settlor.  This term is often just used to refer to someone who creates a trust;
  • Advancement. When making a formal inter vivos gift, you should tell your lawyer if you want to treat a gift as an “advancement” against future gifts you’ve already designated for a beneficiary in your estate plan. That will mean that the value of the current gift will reduce the size or value of your later bequest to the specific beneficiary.  You can also just state that you do not want your current, inter vivos gift treated as an advancement against what you’ve designated for a person or group in your estate plan; 
  • Capital gains taxes. Keep in mind the tax consequences that can occur if you currently give someone an inter vivos gift like stock shares. For example, if you give someone an inter vivos gift of stock shares that originally cost you less than $3,000 – but are now worth over $10,000 — your beneficiary will likely have to pay a capital gains tax on that gift. To prevent this burden from being passed on to a beneficiary, you may just want to give the person cash to buy stock shares — or anything else they prefer;
  • Gift taxes. At present, every beneficiary who receives an inter vivos gift worth more than $15,000 must pay a gift tax on the amount to the IRS. Therefore, most people who give these gifts keep them under $15,000 for each recipient. You’ll need to ask your attorney what the limits are on the size of the inter vivos gifts that spouses may want to give each other.

Choosing to create a trust when transferring wealth as an inter vivos gift

Some grantors may not want to make direct cash or property gifts. Instead, they make want to make this type of gift by creating either a revocable or irrevocable trust. As may now be clear, these types of trusts take effect while the settlor is still alive. In contrast, testamentary trusts don’t take effect until the settlor dies.

Here’s additional information about both revocable and irrevocable inter vivos trusts.

  • The revocable inter vivos trust. This can go into effect (or become operative) during the settlor’s own lifetime. This type of trust can also be referred to as a living trust – one that is drafted so that it won’t have to go through the probate process;
  • The irrevocable inter vivos trust. This type of conveyance is designed to go into effect while the settlor is still alive. However, it cannot be revoked after the settlor has finalized it. People normally use this type of trust to help reduce the beneficiary’s potential tax debt.

Key information about making inter vivos gifts to minors

Since minors cannot receive large gifts of money or property directly, inter vivos gifts made to them require the use of a trust. A party must be named as the guardian of the trust to manage its contents (under court supervision) on behalf of the child – until s/he reaches the age of majority.

Conditions that must be met for a valid inter vivos gift to be made

  • The donor must have capacity. As a donor, you must be at least 18 years old when you make this type of gift;
  • The donor must have the proper intent. This requirement usually means that the donor intends for the gift to be transferred during his/her lifetime;
  • Receipt of the gift by the beneficiary. You must arrange a reliable form of delivery to the beneficiary. This means the donor/grantor (or settlor) will then no longer have control over the funds or other property;
  • Acceptance. The beneficiary must accept the gift. While most of us would readily accept an inter vivos from someone else – that’s not going to be true of everyone. In some cases, high taxes might be due on the gift — or the recipient may simply not want to accept any gift from the grantor or settlor.

Please feel free to contact one of our Murray Lobb attorneys with any questions you may have about making legal gifts to others for current delivery – or to be received later as part of your personal estate plan.

Buying a New Company:  Conducting Due Diligence

Depending on the nature and size of the business you’re interested in buying, the process of completing due diligence can be straightforward or complex. Fortunately, the basic steps you’ll need to follow are rather standard.

After your lawyer has negotiated a Letter of Intent (LOI) with the seller –  covering each party’s duties and responsibilities involving confidentiality, exclusivity and other matters – you’ll be ready to begin the due diligence phase of possibly buying the company.

The Main Reasons for Performing Financial Due Diligence

This process is partially designed to help determine if the initial evaluation placed on the business is fair and if the company is both stable and viable. Time must also be set aside to review all current contracts and potential legal and regulatory liabilities.

Some of the specific aspects of the business you’ll want your Houston business law attorney and personal accountants to carefully review and examine are set forth below.

  • All accounts receivable and payable
  • At least the last three years of the company’s tax filings
  • All current payroll obligations
  • Most or all the major banking transactions for the past year or more
  • The full nature and extent of any outstanding loans on the books

As this initial list of matters indicates, this process can take many months with some businesses. Normally, the parties negotiate the timetable for completing all due diligence examinations in their Letter of Intent (LOI).

Special Inquiries You Must Include Regarding Other Financial Matters

Hopefully, your review of all the financial accounts won’t turn up any troubling questions that can’t be answered. However, since a small percentage of business sellers may be dishonest, your due diligence team must carefully watch out for certain types of “red flags” or irregularities. These can include some of the following concerns.

  • Missing funds
  • References to non-existing accounts
  • Improperly filed tax returns
  • A varying degree of bad debt that’s regularly written off
  • Unstable profit margins

Your lawyer’s due diligence inquiry must also include carefully reviewing all current contracts with other businesses or corporations.

Key Concerns Involving Executory Contracts

  • When are they each due to expire? (This is important since this information can affect the company’s current valuation and other issues). For example, if current supplier contracts are ending soon, you may soon find yourself having to pay far more for critical supplies;
  • What’s the status of all customer contracts? You need to be sure all funds owed to the company are being collected regularly and all goods and services promised are being delivered in a timely manner. Failure to carefully monitor all contract terms can cost you valuable customers and open you up to major legal liabilities;
  • Are all Service contracts being carefully monitored? Nearly every business is dependent on outside service vendors to keep their manufacturing and other equipment working properly. Likewise, contracts are often in place to secure the professional services of lawyers, accountants, computer repair technicians and others. You must make sure the company is properly honoring all these contracts and renegotiating them in a timely and responsible manner;
  • Are all current leases being properly maintained? Companies can’t afford to accidentally let leases lapse on buildings or other property that are essential to their daily operations.
  • Employee Agreements? Do current employees have employment agreements with non-compete clauses? These must be carefully examined because they cannot be assigned if you are only buying the assets.

Due diligence can also extend beyond merely reviewing key financial documents and contracts. It should also include a detailed review of all actual or threatened litigation and regulatory investigations.

Your Lawyers Must Review All Current or Likely Lawsuits & Regulatory Challenges

Each of the following issues must be examined regarding all current or anticipated litigation. They may prove crucial if you decide to still buy a specific company since you’ll probably need to request contractual indemnity for all future liability (and litigation expenses).

  • How costly might each case eventually prove to be? In other words, what potential liabilities are involved?
  • Has the business received formal notice that any of its operations may be operating in conflict with any state or federal statutes or regulations?

You must be willing to sit down with your lawyer and the target company’s current legal counsel to sort through all these legal and regulatory concerns since they directly bear on the business’ current valuation and the wisdom or folly of buying it.

While the due diligence concerns referenced above are not intended to be fully comprehensive, they should help you understand many of the critical matters that must be examined. Once you make it through this due diligence stage, you can then either decline to buy the company or move forward into the “closing” or final transactions phase.

Please feel free to contact our law office so we can help guide you through the various stages of due diligence as you try to decide whether you should buy a specific company.