Should My New Texas Business Be Formed as an “S” Corp or an LLC?

While deciding which business structure will best serve your needs, always consider several key factors. For example, look at how many employees you plan on hiring and how much time you want to spend managing the company. You should also make sure you’re fully protecting your personal assets against future lawsuits and not incurring any excess taxes.

One excellent way to choose the best structure for your company is to meet with your Houston business law attorney. The two of you can discuss all that you might gain (or lose) by starting your company as either an LLC (limited liability company) or an “S” corporation.

Before noting some of the basic steps involved with forming an LLC and an “S” corporation, here’s a brief overview of the unique offerings and drawbacks of both structures.

What are some chief advantages and drawbacks of starting an LLC?

Depending on the size of your business and the types of goods or services you’re selling, you may prefer an LLC for the following reasons.

  • It offers a less formal structure. An “LLC” is also often easier to manage than an “S” corporation, especially when you have few employees. And you’ll never need to have any board meetings to tackle problems tied to issuing stock certificates;
  • You can readily change this business structure (once all proper paperwork is filed). If

you’re running an “S’ corporation, you’ll first have to arrange a formal board meeting before trying to change the business structure);

  • All members of an “LLC” do not have to be permanent residents or U. S. citizens;
  • You can more easily divide up who handles most of the daily work – while allowing others to just be investors. You can also simply divide up the profits based on each person’s initial investment and daily work contributions;
  • Disadvantages of an “LLC” compared to an “S” corporation. These can include having all the company profits subjected to self-employment taxes. Your growth may be limited since your business cannot issue any stock shares. Always ask your Houston business law attorney about any other potential disadvantages that may apply to your unique situation.

Why do some entrepreneurs prefer forming “S” corporations – despite the limitations?

  • Formality is viewed more favorably by some. Outside businesses often prefer interacting with companies that employ a more formal corporate structure;
  • You can often use this structure to avoid double taxation of income;
  • Profits are passed on to the shareholders (by way of their paid dividends). Therefore, the company does not have to pay taxes on those profits;
  • Possible drawbacks. All shareholders must be permanent residents or U.S. citizens. There can be no more than 100 shareholders. Added state filing fees may apply. Also, the IRS

tends to monitor “S” corporations very closely since some people try to improperly avoid certain taxes by wrongfully using this business structure.

What are some basic issues that must be addressed while forming an “LLC” in Texas?

  • Membership. You’ll need to decide how many owners or members you’ll have and if they’ll share all the managerial duties;
  • Naming your business. You must choose a unique name to avoid confusion with already existing companies;
  • File all required forms. You’ll need to start with a certificate of formation (Form 205) that must be filed with the Texas Secretary of State’s Office;
  • Registered agent. You must name a registered agent who can accept the service of process on behalf of your company;
  • You’ll need to create an operating agreement. It’s usually best to ask your Houston business law attorney to draft this document for you after you’ve

discussed the precise nature of your new business;

  • Fully satisfy all state and federal paperwork requirements;
  • Obtain all required state and local business licenses that may be required for your industry.

(Note: Some of these same steps may also be required while forming an “S” corporation below, regardless of whether they’re listed).

Here’s a brief review of key issues involved in starting an “S” corporation in Texas

  • The drafting of Articles of Incorporation. These must be filed with the Texas Secretary of State’s Office;
  • Stock certificates must be issued to all initial shareholders;
  • All applicable business licenses and certificates must be obtained in a timely manner;
  • You’ll need to file Form 2553 with the Internal Revenue Service. (Your lawyer can first check to be sure you meet all the qualifying terms for creating an “S” corporation).

Please feel free to contact one of our Murray Lobb lawyers so we can answer your questions about each of these business structures. We can also help you draft all the documents you’ll need to transact business throughout the year.

Obtaining A Mechanic’s Lien in Texas

Once your company has been hired as a contractor or subcontractor to build, repair or renovate a structure for others, it may become necessary to file a mechanic’s lien on the property to ensure that you’ll be promptly paid for all your labor and materials. This type of lien must be filed with the County Recorder or Clerk in the county where the property is located. When a company fails to file this type of lien before the property worked on is sold – it can become more difficult to enforce your rights against the party who contracted with you.

As the State Bar of Texas explains in one of its publications addressing mechanic lien rights, shortly after you begin your work – and long before you ever need to send out any invoices  — you should also consider sending out two notices to the other parties to your contract. These are known as a Notice of Contractual Retainage Agreement and a Notice of Specially Fabricated Materials. 

Since mechanic’s liens can be rather detailed and are drafted a bit differently in most states, it’s always wise to obtain legal advice on how this document should be appropriately worded. However, it’s usually not best to begin trying to collect all funds owed to you by filing this type of lien. Your first step in the process of seeking payment should be to simply mail your final invoice and other pertinent statements to the party that hired your company.

Additional Steps That Should Precede the Filing of a Mechanic’s Lien

It’s a good idea to send your initial invoice and statements via certified mail so you can later document the amount of time the other party has had to pay all that’s owed. If you receive no response, you should directly call the party who initially agreed to pay your company for its work. If you still cannot obtain the money owed, you should ask your Texas business attorney to send a formal yet polite demand letter using the law firm letterhead, seeking immediate payment of all sums owed.

Once a late-paying client is aware that you have a law firm acting on your behalf, they will often submit prompt payment. If you still cannot recover all sums owed to you, be sure to ask your attorney how quickly you must file a mechanic’s lien – so that a sale of the property on which you worked cannot occur so quickly that it might compromise your rights.

Consider Filing a Lawsuit after Filing a Lien

As your lawyer will tell you, Texas is a bit different than many other states because our state’s laws providing the right to file a contractor’s lien are set forth in our state constitution. In fact, Article XVI, Section 37 of the Texas Constitution protects the rights of all mechanics, artisans and others who handle materials while building, repairing or renovating another party’s property. These rights are further set forth in Chapter 53 of the Texas Property Code.

Unfortunately, Chapter 53 is rather long and its description of your mechanic’s lien rights can be difficult to interpret at times. Nevertheless, an experienced attorney can provide you with answers to your questions that cannot be readily answered by reading that material. Common questions regarding liens often revolve around the types of contractors and subcontractors who can file a valid mechanic’s lien.

Texas law clearly indicates that most companies – even those who only briefly work on the property while planting a few trees or providing their landscaping skills — are entitled to file a lien.

Should You Also File a Lawsuit?

This is always a matter that you must discuss with your attorney. When it’s recommended, it’s normally done in addition to filing a mechanic’s lien against each of the appropriate parties to your contract. If you pursue this remedy, your lawyer will present several arguments. Chief among them will be the assertion that the party who directly hired you has breached your contract by failing to timely pay all reasonable amounts owed.

Our firm recognizes that it’s often difficult to understand all Texas mechanic’s lien rights, even if you’ve been working as a contractor or subcontractor for many years. Therefore, we welcome the chance to meet with you, so we can provide all the guidance you may need to obtain full and timely payment for all the services you have rendered to others.

Pursuing Federal Government “Set-Aside” Contracts

If you’re looking for new ways to “grow” your small business, you may want to learn more about qualifying to bid on federal government “set-aside” contracts. The Small Business Administration (SBA) says there are two basic types of these set-aside contracts. Both can result in highly lucrative contracts that might otherwise have been awarded to far larger companies

The difference between “sole-source” and general competitive bidding set-aside contracts

This “sole-source” type of set-aside contract is often awarded through a non-competitive bidding process when the government believes that only one single business can meet the contract’s requirements. Companies seeking to bid on these types of contracts must first register with SAM (the System for Award Management). Occasionally, these types of sole-source contracts may be managed so that competitive bids will be accepted.

However, most small businesses try to submit bids after qualifying for one of four main federal government set-aside contract programs that always consider competitive bids. Here’s a closer look at each of them.

The four main types of federal government set-aside contracting programs

  1. Women-owned companies. Each year, the federal government tries to award at least five percent of all federal contracting dollars to Women-Owned Small Businesses (WOSBs).

The goal is to try and help women gain access to more business contracts now since male-run companies were often favored during past decades.

  1. Companies owned chiefly by a disabled military veteran. At present, the SBA states that the federal government seeks to award about three percent of all federal government set-aside contracts to disabled-veteran owned businesses;
  2. 8 (a) business development program entities. These businesses are usually run by socially or economically disadvantaged owners. In some cases, they’re helped by forming joint ventures with more established companies. An SBA specialist may be assigned to help the owners gain a better understanding of how the federal government contracting process is designed to work. Each year, at least five percent of all federal contracting dollars are awarded to owners of these types of businesses;
  3. HubZone certified small businesses. For your company to qualify to bid on this type of set-aside federal government contract, it must be at least 51% owned and controlled by a U.S. citizen, an agricultural cooperative, a Community Development Program, an Indian tribe or a Native Hawaiian organization. The principal place of business for a HubZone company must be located in a qualified HubZone area. In general, these businesses are viewed as “distressed” and are often found in underrepresented rural or urban populations.

If you’d like to find out if your company can be certified to bid on federal government contracts under one of these four competitive set-aside programs, plan on meeting with your Houston business law attorney. You can then discuss the various challenges you may encounter while trying to become a small business contractor with the federal government. You can also ask how you might submit bids to any state government contracting programs.

After speaking with your lawyer, you may also want to pursue a special SBA training program. Even if your business cannot currently qualify for certification under one of the set-aside programs described above, you can still try to obtain specialized training that can help you better manage your employees while expanding your customer base without doing business with any government programs.

Please feel free to contact one of our Murray Lobb attorneys about your current interest in bidding on specific types of government or private enterprise business contracts. In addition to providing you with our best legal advice, we can also help you create the formal paperwork that you may need.

Small Businesses Often Make Crucial Legal Mistakes

Even highly competent employees sometimes make serious legal errors while handling human resource, management, accounting and other business tasks. Since federal, state and local laws are constantly being updated, you must regularly speak with numerous employees to be sure they’re making timely and lawful decisions.

Should the feedback you receive concern you, it’s always best to consult with your Houston business law attorney to be sure you know how to promptly correct any possible errors. Lawsuits are often filed over very basic legal mistakes.

What are some of the most common legal errors that businesses keep making?

Most mistakes are made when employers try to be flexible with their rules. While compassion can go a long way toward helping you get along better with your employees, clarity and consistency are crucial. Always exercise caution when addressing the following issues.

  1. Each employee must be properly classified. You need to look at each position separately, based on all pertinent state and federal laws. If you simply decide to treat everyone as an “exempt” employee, you might be sued if you fail to provide proper overtime pay or adequate rest periods.
  2. Lunch breaks must be provided when required by law. Some employees may be entitled to a meal break after completing a specific number of hours during a shift.
  3. Make sure you’re properly labeling workers as either employees or independent contractors. You may hear from the IRS if you make this type of mistake. Take the time to speak with your lawyer about how you should carefully interact and communicate with independent contractors. Once a worker has strong legal grounds for believing that “employee” status has been conferred, you can be sued for specific benefits.
  4. You must be sure all employees understand what constitutes “sexual harassment.” If you’re sued in this field, one of your strongest defenses will be that you promptly trained all new managers and employees to help create a healthy work atmosphere. You must also develop a secure way for employees to submit complaints before problems escalate.
  5. You cannot punish or fire an employee for simply taking a leave of absence under the Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA). To protect yourself, keep accurate records of all employee evaluations being conducted at routine intervals. If you’re particularly concerned about the behavior of someone taking FMLA leave, ask your attorney when you should sit down with that employee to discuss why you’re carefully monitoring their work performance – before letting them go.
  6. Be sure to issue final paychecks on a timely basis to all employees who are leaving. Find out if you’re required to provide this type of check even before an employee has returned all employer-provided equipment, vehicles or other materials.
  7. You must handle making loans to employees in a very careful manner. While this is often a kind gesture, you must set up a formal repayment schedule. Never simply deduct a portion of what’s owed from each future paycheck.
  8. Be sure to properly handle all employer obligations under the Americans with Disability Act (ADA). You may need to make appropriate work accommodations and should always treat such workers fairly. Most disabled workers take great pride in being highly dependable and productive workers.
  9. COBRA healthcare coverage must be offered and administered properly. Give serious thought to creating a comprehensive package of this medical insurance paperwork so that it’s immediately ready to be given to qualified employees when they leave. Timing is critical so potential coverage won’t lapse.
  10. The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) must be explained and handled appropriately. Employees have a right to privacy regarding their medical data and information – be sure you’re adequately protecting it while processing claims.
  11. Pension concerns must be addressed in a timely and proper manner. The Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA) is a complicated law that requires extreme attention to detail. Always request legal advice when uncertain how to administer it.
  12. You must carefully handle all responsibilities under the Consumer Credit Protection Act (CCPA). You may need expert help calculating all your employees’ paycheck deductions for lawful wage garnishments – including those for child support and student loans. Look for highly respected software that may help your most experienced workers.
  13. Equal Pay Act. This law must be carefully followed since too many businesses keep failing to pay men and women fairly when handling similar work.
  14. Title VII concerns. Your company must avoid discriminatory practices when hiring, laying off and firing employees. Many businesses are learning to use multiple interviewers with highly diverse backgrounds so that fairness can be readily achieved.
  15. OSHA laws. You must make sure to keep adequate records covering all workplace accidents and injuries for an appropriate number of years — if you employ ten or more workers.

Should you have any questions about these topics, please contact your Murray Lobb lawyer to discuss your concerns. We have extensive experience providing legal advice to our clients so they can can readily comply with all federal, state and local laws.

How the Texas Business Opportunities Act Seeks to Help Consumers

One the main goals of the Texas Business Opportunity Act is to protect consumers interested in starting their own businesses from scam artists eager to defraud them out of their money. When ads appear on TV or via email — promising large profits in exchange for a small, initial investment – it’s never wise to assume a valid offer is being made.

Some of the most common business opportunity ads often claim that you’ll need to do very little work before you’ll start receiving your first profits. That’s rarely an honest offer since running a business is often hard work. Now that so many older Americans (and others) have been laid off from their jobs, it’s critical to carefully review each offer and look for “red flags” warning you of possible fraud.

The following information will help explain some of the different ways that the Texas Business Opportunity Act tries to regulate the way that many programs go about seeking investors and operating in this state.

Types of business offers governed by the Texas Business Opportunity Act

  1. Those that require the buyer to pay at least $500 to begin setting up the business that’s being sold;
  2. Where the seller claims that you’ll earn back your initial investment (or more) in profits; and
  3. The seller promises to do one or more of the following acts to close the deal:

a). Provide you with a location – or help you find one (that’s not currently owned by you or the seller) where you can use or operate the goods or services being leased or sold by the seller;

 b.) Help you create a marketing, sales and production program (unrelated to a formal franchise business governed by separate laws);

 c.) Promises to buy back products, equipment or supplies (or goods made from them) provided to you so you can run the business.

To further protect the public from dishonest business offers, the Attorney General of Texas requires parties making offers that meet the description above to first register with the Secretary of State and provide any applicable bond or trust account required.

Whenever you become interested in investing in any business opportunity that even vaguely appears to be covered by the Texas Business Opportunity Act, it’s always best to review the matter with your Houston business law attorney. Our firm can check to be sure the seller’s company has formally registered with the Texas Secretary of State’s Office and posted all required funds.

As a potential investor, you should also be provided with key information (required by law) about any company – before ever tendering any money.

Legal disclosures companies must provide

When a business offer is made in Texas and is covered by the Texas Business Opportunity Act, the seller must provide specific information to the buyer ten (or more) days before any contract is signed by the parties and before any money is paid to the seller.

Here are some of the disclosures that must be provided.

  • Names and addresses of all parties directly affiliated with the seller in the business being marketed;
  • A specific listing of all services the seller is promising to perform for the buyer (such as setting up a product marketing program);
  • An updated, current financial statement covering the seller’s finances;
  • All details covering any training program being offered by the seller;
  • How all services will be provided by the seller regarding the products and equipment being sold – and all key terms involved with the leasing agreements covering business locations being provided to the buyer;
  • Information pertaining to any of the seller’s bankruptcies (or civil judgments obtained against the seller) during the last seven years.

The importance of distinguishing multi-level marketing offers from pyramid schemes

Make sure the business you’re interested in requires you to do some type of work (such as selling products or services) before paying you any profits. If you are only being urged to solicit additional participants in the business, there’s a strong chance that you’re being “tricked” into building a pyramid scheme that may earn you short-term gains before the entire investment program collapses.

Always obtain legal advice regarding any business that sounds too much like a quick way to earn a lot of money. Attractive shortcuts to huge profits – especially those promoted in many weekend hotel and restaurant seminars – are often sham operations.

Please contact our law firm so we can provide you with the legal advice you’ll need before investing in any new business opportunities.

Steps Required to Dissolve a General Partnership in Texas

Steps Required to Dissolve a General Partnership in Texas

Even when business partners get along well with each other and succeed, a time may come when they may develop new interests, decide to retire or move elsewhere for business or pleasure reasons. While the Internet and modern communications make it possible to still run businesses with partners scattered around the globe, it’s still quite common for partnerships to break apart or take on new members when others leave.

Do You Need a Written Partnership Agreement in Texas?

Normally, Texas law doesn’t require general (or “at-will”) partnerships to create a written partnership agreement. However, it’s always best to draft one so that when the entity breaks apart (or any partner leaves), you’ll know exactly how to pay off all partnership debts and distribute the remaining assets among everyone.

When general partnerships don’t have an agreement, then Texas law expects the partners to govern their “wind-up” activities in keeping with our state’s default partnership laws.

Here’s a broad overview of the tasks that you and your partners must handle as you dissolve your partnership. Should you have any questions at this early stage, it’s always wise to schedule an appointment with your Houston business law attorney.

First Steps to Take When Preparing to Dissolve Your Partnership

Schedule a meeting so everyone can discuss how your written partnership agreement requires you to dissolve the partnership. During this meeting, you must take a vote to determine if all parties still holding majority rights (or financial interests equal to or greater than 50% of the partnership assets) favor dissolving it. Next, ask this same majority to vote whether they’re ready to draft and sign a written resolution stating that the partnership will now wind up all its affairs and be dissolved.

At this point, all partners who want to keep working together under a new partnership agreement can indicate this desire to everyone else – and offer to buy-out the partnership shares of those who are leaving.

Handling Debt Payments and Winding Up All Remaining Matters

Every current partner should expressly agree to complete certain tasks approved by all those winding down the partnership’s affairs – and to refrain from negotiating any new business that could potentially obligate all partners after the dissolution.

As referenced above, those leaving the partnership are free to sell their shares in it to others, in keeping with their original partnership agreement (or the state’s laws governing such transactions when there is no written agreement). To help the partnership pay off existing debts, all partners can vote on which current partnership assets (if any) may be sold for cash.

The laws governing the pay-off of all partnership debts are set forth in our state’s Uniform Partnership Act. It basically states that you must pay off all your creditors first – before paying back each partner for all past capital contributions to the partnership.

Are There Any Remaining Wind-Up Steps You Must Address?

  • Paperwork filing with the state. In Texas, there’s no need to file anything when dissolving an at-will (general) partnership;
  • Providing notice to all creditors, customers and other parties. It’s customary to send out notices through the mail to all your business contacts so they’ll know that your partnership is being dissolved as of a certain date. However, there’s no law which requires this to be done. You can also just simply publish a notice about the dissolution in your local newspaper;
  • Updating all out-of-state registrations. To prevent your partnership from owing any more fees to other states where you’ve registered for the right to do business, you need to formally notify the correct offices via certified mail that you’re dissolving your partnership;
  • Paying all taxes that are owed. Although Texas doesn’t require you to obtain a tax clearance before winding-up your partnership, you must make sure all taxes owed have been paid before dissolving it. This step includes filing a final federal tax return for your partnership in keeping with Texas law.

Should you have any specific questions about dissolving your partnership – or making sure that you’re handling all tax matters properly – please contact our law firm so we can provide you with all pertinent legal advice.

An Overview:  Winding Up Texas Corporate Activities

An Overview:  Winding Up Texas Corporate Activities

Corporate officers can choose to formally “wind-up” all business activities when many different factors change. For example, when smaller corporations are involved, key parties may simply want to retire or pursue new goals. In other situations, market trends may change so significantly that corporate officers may want to choose more advantageous business structures. Regardless of why any specific Texas corporation decides to go through the termination process, basic legal steps must be followed carefully.

Since this process can involve different statutes, including detailed sections of the state’s Business Organizations Code, it’s always best to confer with your Houston corporate law attorneys. They’ll readily understand the termination process that the Texas Secretary of State’s Office expects each corporation to complete. (Of course, in some instances, a corporation may be involuntarily terminated for various reasons – including the failure to file annual reports).

Here’s a look at some of the steps you must be ready to take based on our state’s governing laws and the specific realities involved with your business. Although other states may speak of “dissolving” corporations, Texas usually refers to “winding up” corporate matters.

The Texas Business Organization Code’s Two Main Ways to “Wind Up” Activities

  1. The board of directors adopts a resolution. It should state that they are recommending that the corporation “wind up” its activities — after submitting this proposal to all the shareholders. At a properly convened meeting, the shareholders must then vote on this proposal. In general, a two-thirds majority of the shareholders must approve this decision before the winding-up process can begin;
  2. All shareholders must sign a “consent” document. Once this has been done, the “consent” document must be entered into the corporate records. This approach is most common when smaller corporations are involved. Great care must be taken to cover all key termination matters within this consent agreement.

Once this early internal activity has been concluded, numerous other steps must be taken to properly conclude all corporate business matters.

Common Additional Steps Required to “Wind Up” Your Corporation

  • All known parties with claims against the corporation must be served with notice of the current intent to terminate the corporation’s existence;
  • Every necessary corporate lawsuit must be properly initiated and concluded;
  • All corporate property must be properly collected and sold – depending on whether its value is owed in some manner to the shareholders;
  • All corporate liabilities must be properly discharged – including the payment of any taxes owed to the IRS or the state of Texas.

General Tax Issues and Obtaining Required Certificates

While your Texas corporate attorney may be prepared to handle all your corporation’s tax payment issues involved with the “winding up” process, you may also want to confer with a tax attorney.

Keep in mind that your corporation must obtain a “certificate of account status” from the Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts — and a final federal tax return must be properly filed once all corporate finances have been finalized.

Filing a Certificate of Termination

After you’ve obtained a certificate of account status from the Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts, you’ll need to file Form 651 (a certificate of termination) with the Secretary of State’s Office. Once this step has been taken and approved, your corporation’s existence has legally ended.

Added Issues That May Need to Be Addressed

Keep in mind that the information provided above was simply intended as an overview of the Texas corporate “winding up” process. Your attorney will be able to provide you further advice about whether additional paperwork is required. Fox example, certain Texas laws governing corporate mergers may or may not apply to your situation.

Please feel free to contact our law office with any questions you may have about possibly terminating your Texas corporation – or any other business entity. We can provide you with the advice you’ll need to properly handle all required stages of this process.