Voters To Determine Whether Texas Changes Home Equity Lending Laws

Now that the Texas House and Senate have approved SJR 60 and its companion bill HJR 99, Texans must decide in November whether we should amend our state constitution’s home equity law provisions. Any changes to the state constitution require a voter-approved amendment. The proposed changes may benefit many borrowers and they would remove a prohibition that currently prevents agricultural homestead owners from seeking home equity loans.

Additional Changes Addressed by SJR 60/HJR 99

This joint bill is designed to accomplish several goals. One key objective is to lower the current three percent cap on fees that can be charged to borrowers initiating a home equity loan down to only a two percent cap. To achieve this change, the bill separates out from the cap such fees as property surveys, appraisals, title exam reports and state base premiums. This change is designed to help low-income borrowers and those needing loans in more rural areas.

This means that borrowers seeking home equity loans under $50,000 might currently see those added fees go over the three percent cap. However, if the cap is lowered and the other changes noted above are made, those same borrowers could probably avoid that problem. This proposed amendment would also increase the present loan-to-value ratio up to 80 percent (from its current level of 50%) on home equity lines of credit.

Consumers may also benefit from a new provision allowing them to refinance home equity loans that have already existed for at least one year. They could turn such loans into traditional mortgages if all required conditions are met. Those who wish to make these types of changes would be owed new disclosures clearly outlining the potential benefits that might be lost by making this change. Special time deadlines would also have to be met, making sure that each consumer clearly understands the full impact of converting the loan into a traditional mortgage well before the refinance closing date.

Recent Legislative History Regarding This Joint Bill

Back in 2015, Representative Richard Raymond of Laredo proposed a bill that addressed the three percent fee cap issue by removing specific third-party expenses from the cap. Although that bill failed to pass, it did raise awareness of these important issues.

Meeting Constitutional Change Requirements and Putting Matters to a Vote

The passage of these joint bills required a two-thirds majority vote in both the Texas House and Senate. Now that requirement has been met, it’s time to put this matter on the ballot so voters can make the final decision on November 7, 2017. Should Texas voters approve this amendment, the changes to our state constitution will take effect on January 1, 2018.

Should you have any questions about how you should initiate financing for your home or other purchases, please contact our office and allow us the privilege of helping you. We can also answer any other questions you might have about various contracts and lending practices.

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