Buying a New Company:  Conducting Due Diligence

Depending on the nature and size of the business you’re interested in buying, the process of completing due diligence can be straightforward or complex. Fortunately, the basic steps you’ll need to follow are rather standard.

After your lawyer has negotiated a Letter of Intent (LOI) with the seller –  covering each party’s duties and responsibilities involving confidentiality, exclusivity and other matters – you’ll be ready to begin the due diligence phase of possibly buying the company.

The Main Reasons for Performing Financial Due Diligence

This process is partially designed to help determine if the initial evaluation placed on the business is fair and if the company is both stable and viable. Time must also be set aside to review all current contracts and potential legal and regulatory liabilities.

Some of the specific aspects of the business you’ll want your Houston business law attorney and personal accountants to carefully review and examine are set forth below.

  • All accounts receivable and payable
  • At least the last three years of the company’s tax filings
  • All current payroll obligations
  • Most or all the major banking transactions for the past year or more
  • The full nature and extent of any outstanding loans on the books

As this initial list of matters indicates, this process can take many months with some businesses. Normally, the parties negotiate the timetable for completing all due diligence examinations in their Letter of Intent (LOI).

Special Inquiries You Must Include Regarding Other Financial Matters

Hopefully, your review of all the financial accounts won’t turn up any troubling questions that can’t be answered. However, since a small percentage of business sellers may be dishonest, your due diligence team must carefully watch out for certain types of “red flags” or irregularities. These can include some of the following concerns.

  • Missing funds
  • References to non-existing accounts
  • Improperly filed tax returns
  • A varying degree of bad debt that’s regularly written off
  • Unstable profit margins

Your lawyer’s due diligence inquiry must also include carefully reviewing all current contracts with other businesses or corporations.

Key Concerns Involving Executory Contracts

  • When are they each due to expire? (This is important since this information can affect the company’s current valuation and other issues). For example, if current supplier contracts are ending soon, you may soon find yourself having to pay far more for critical supplies;
  • What’s the status of all customer contracts? You need to be sure all funds owed to the company are being collected regularly and all goods and services promised are being delivered in a timely manner. Failure to carefully monitor all contract terms can cost you valuable customers and open you up to major legal liabilities;
  • Are all Service contracts being carefully monitored? Nearly every business is dependent on outside service vendors to keep their manufacturing and other equipment working properly. Likewise, contracts are often in place to secure the professional services of lawyers, accountants, computer repair technicians and others. You must make sure the company is properly honoring all these contracts and renegotiating them in a timely and responsible manner;
  • Are all current leases being properly maintained? Companies can’t afford to accidentally let leases lapse on buildings or other property that are essential to their daily operations.
  • Employee Agreements? Do current employees have employment agreements with non-compete clauses? These must be carefully examined because they cannot be assigned if you are only buying the assets.

Due diligence can also extend beyond merely reviewing key financial documents and contracts. It should also include a detailed review of all actual or threatened litigation and regulatory investigations.

Your Lawyers Must Review All Current or Likely Lawsuits & Regulatory Challenges

Each of the following issues must be examined regarding all current or anticipated litigation. They may prove crucial if you decide to still buy a specific company since you’ll probably need to request contractual indemnity for all future liability (and litigation expenses).

  • How costly might each case eventually prove to be? In other words, what potential liabilities are involved?
  • Has the business received formal notice that any of its operations may be operating in conflict with any state or federal statutes or regulations?

You must be willing to sit down with your lawyer and the target company’s current legal counsel to sort through all these legal and regulatory concerns since they directly bear on the business’ current valuation and the wisdom or folly of buying it.

While the due diligence concerns referenced above are not intended to be fully comprehensive, they should help you understand many of the critical matters that must be examined. Once you make it through this due diligence stage, you can then either decline to buy the company or move forward into the “closing” or final transactions phase.

Please feel free to contact our law office so we can help guide you through the various stages of due diligence as you try to decide whether you should buy a specific company.

Choosing Reputable Charities for Your Texas Estate Plan

Many Americans now name one or more charities in their Wills or other estate planning documents to help these important cultural and humanitarian groups maintain adequate funding. However, others less familiar with charitable giving need to understand that, before arranging these types of gifts, they must carefully evaluate each charity or non-profit group to be sure their funds will be shared properly. 

Fortunately, there are several reputable organizations that will readily help consumers decide which charitable or non-profit groups are properly using all their donations while minimizing administrative costs. These same “watchdog” groups often urge all charitable groups to maintain open donation and expenditure records. In addition, our Texas Attorney General’s Office has put together some useful tips that can help all of us do a better job of deciding which charities will be the most responsible recipients of our testamentary gifts.

Here’s a list of basic tips that can help all of us better evaluate all non-profits and charities. That information is followed by a list of different websites and groups dedicated to providing consumers with current news about charitable activities. Of course, it’s always best to start your search by first visiting with your Houston estate planning attorney who may already know about the reputations of many charitable organizations.

Important Information to Obtain While Choosing Charities to Include in Your Estate Plan

  • First, be sure to obtain the full legal name of each group, its address and telephone number. Next, ask if the IRS has formally recognized it as a public charity that’s tax exempt. Then, ask if your donations will all be fully tax deductible.
  • Find out how long the non-profit or charity (hereinafter just referenced as ‘charity’) has been in existence.  While longevity doesn’t always ensure completely honest and frugal management of funds, it does mean that it should be easier to research the group’s reputation by visiting several of the online sources named below.
  • Request a recent annual report that clearly indicates how much money the group spends on administrative costs and how much of every donated dollar will directly benefit those the charity is seeking to help.
  • Find out if the charity’s main goals are related to education, medical services, scientific and medical research – or perhaps providing scholarships to those pursuing careers in specific vocational fields.
  • Do not give the group any of your private bank account or credit card information during your investigative calls – although it’s best to be honest about your intentions. Also, if you’re not ready to receive numerous emails or letters to your home address, avoid giving that type of information out right now.

Be sure to ask members of your professional or business circles if any of them have had positive experiences with the charities that interest you the most. When any charity has a publicly named board of directors, consider contacting those individuals directly by phone to ask them about their experiences with handling tasks on behalf of the charity.

When you’re ready, start visiting some of the websites set forth below to see what you can find out about each of the charities that seem to be highly reputable.

Online Websites Offering Detailed Information About Various Charities

  • Give.org. This website includes the sub-title, “BBB Wise Giving Alliance.” On its page dedicated to donors, it states that you can look up information about each charity’s effectiveness, governance, finances – and current brochures or other materials available to the public.
  • The American Institute of Philanthropy (Charity Watch). Among its various offerings, this website offers a list of charitable groups involved with some highly specific causes and issues.
  • Guidestar. This online resource offers a wide array of information about many reputable non-profit groups.
  • Charity Navigator. Like the other websites already named above, this one offers timely information about many charities. It also provides a “hot topics” link that will tell you more about charities currently in the news for one reason or another.

All four of the oversight groups listed above are noted on the Texas Attorney General website. You can also find out additional information about specific charities by visiting this Consumer Reports page.

If you haven’t already thought about giving to a charity or non-profit when you pass away, please consider doing so now.  All Texans need to do a bit more to help others so our state can become more compassionate — and improve our current ranking for charitable giving.

Please feel free to contact our firm so we can explain some of the best ways to include charities as beneficiaries in your estate plan. There are specific legal ways of handling this task so that your estate will reap the best tax advantages available.

Common Reasons for Creating a Spendthrift Trust

Nearly all of us have relatives who need extra help managing their income and assets. When we can, we try to find ways to help them. In some instances, you might have a grandson or granddaughter who’s having trouble holding down a steady part-time job during college – or trying to make ends meet after battling a lengthy addiction. Your troubled relative might also be older and starting to struggle with handling all his monthly financial affairs.

Whatever the individual’s special needs may be, you can often help by making the person a beneficiary of a spendthrift trust.

How Should You Define This Type of Trust to the Beneficiary?

You may first want to simply say that, because you greatly care for this individual, you want to remove all or most of her current money management problems from her life. You can then say that you’ve named the person as a beneficiary of a special trust account that will be managed by a trustee. You should then quickly point out that you’ll be personally choosing the exact terms governing the trust so the trustee can properly meet specific needs of the beneficiary.

Should the beneficiary ask if she can personally manage the money, you must be ready to say that you have considered that alternative and prefer to disburse the funds over time. You might also note your desire to prevent the funds from being taken by untrustworthy creditors. (Of course, there are legal exceptions that do allow some creditors to reach these funds, and they’ll be briefly addressed below).

It’s also useful to tell the beneficiary that the funds or property that you’ll be placing in the trust as its creator (grantor) are generally referred to as the trust principal.

What Basic Terms and Provisions Are Normally Included in a Spendthrift Trust?

As your Houston estate planning lawyer will tell you, specific language must be included in the trust document, making it clear that you’re creating a spendthrift trust, in keeping with Texas law. This enabling language is designed to fully protect all the property and funds that you’re placing in the trust from others who might try to illegally reach them. All of this is clearly explained in the Texas Property Code, Title 9, entitled “Trusts.”

Your spendthrift trust language will clearly state that since the beneficiary has no right to directly reach and control the funds – neither can most creditors. Most grantors also include some specific language indicating that they are trying to provide for the beneficiary’s general needs.

As the grantor/settlor you must also clearly state all the trustee’s rights, duties and obligations while administering the trust. The trustee’s job can be a very difficult one, especially if the beneficiary decides to legally challenge the trustee by demanding large sums of money for serious medical, educational or basic living expenses not expressly referenced in the trust.

When Can Creditors & Other Parties Successfully Obtain Funds from a Spendthrift Trust?

The laws in most states allow creditors that can prove that a beneficiary owes them money for basic “necessities” (like shelter or food) to win judgments and collect funds from these types of trusts. Other legal obligations that can be paid out of spendthrift trust funds (once legal action has been taken) include child support, alimony or support of a past (or current) spouse and certain government claims.

When funds are periodically released to a beneficiary, creditors can also try to obtain them based on judgments they’ve obtained. 

Please feel free to contact one of our Murray Lobb attorneys to learn more about the various types of trusts and other estate planning tools that we can draft to meet all your needs, including a spendthrift trust.

Tortious Interference with Inheritance:  Not a Valid Claim in Texas

The Supreme Court of Texas states in its Archer v. Anderson opinion (published in June 2018) that “there is no cause of action in Texas for tortious interference with inheritance.” This ruling was based on the court’s holding that there are other adequate, valid remedies for pursuing inheritance-related claims without doing so under this specific tort that conflicts with Texas probate law.

The basic facts set forth in the Archer case.

Stated succinctly, Archer v. Anderson involved a man named John R. “Jack” Archer who had married and divorced four times and never had any children of his own. In a 1991 Will, Archer left the bulk of his estate to his brother and his six children (a generous sum was also left to charities). Seven years later, Jack Archer suffered a stroke that left him very confused, disoriented and delusional.

Multiple parties soon stepped in at different times, trying to coerce Mr. Archer into changing his estate plans. Guardianship proceedings were also pursued. Eventually, the Archer family sued Jack Archer’s attorney, Ted Anderson, for breach of fiduciary duty, legal malpractice, and intentional infliction of emotional distress. (They also sued others on Mr. Archer’s behalf).

Anderson passed away in March 2006 and Jack Archer died one month later. After Jack’s 1991 Will was probated, the Archers received their bequests under it. (Many other complex events also transpired, eventually leading both sides to file appeals that were addressed in this Supreme Court of Texas opinion).

Tortious interference with an inheritance has never been formally recognized in Texas.

The Supreme Court of Texas clearly notes that neither its predecessors on the bench – nor the State’s legislature – have ever formally recognized the claim of tortious interference with inheritance. However, over the years, various parties have repeatedly argued that such a claim was basically implied in other cases.

How should Texans respond and protect themselves based on this ruling?

Parties who believe that their contractual right to inherit from someone has been thwarted by a third party due to fraud, undue influence, issues involving testamentary capacity, or drafting irregularities — can still petition a court for help. A probate court could set aside certain gifts based on the offering of proper evidence – and might also correct a wrongful act by imposing a constructive trust so that no one will be unjustly enriched.

Of course, however parties proceed, they must be ready to cover court costs and attorney fees on their own.

To further combat fraud, it’s crucial for all family members to stay very actively involved with their elderly or disabled loved ones.

When few people keep in touch, numerous parties claiming to be friends or caregivers can find both cruel and hidden ways to steal from elderly or disabled people’s estates. (If you haven’t already done so, be sure to read The New Yorker article entitled, “How the Elderly Lose Their Rightsand AARP’sFraud in the Family.”

Please feel free to contact Murray Lobb so we can help you with all your estate planning needs. We can also provide you with legal advice on how you should proceed if you believe anyone is currently trying to defraud you (or a loved one) of any estate funds.

How Should You Respond to Potentially False I-9 Documentation?

At present, the federal government expects companies to carefully examine all I-9 documents presented by job applicants and to ask questions about required paperwork that looks like it may have been altered. Once you receive proper documents that look valid, you must keep your copy of the completed I-9 form on file, ready to share it with ICE (Immigration and Customs Enforcement) upon request. In some cases, you may be given only three days’ notice to produce these documents for all your employees.

To help employers fulfill their duties, ICE provides general guidelines that describe how all I-9 document reviews should be handled. These guidelines are further referenced below, along with topics you should address with your human resource staff to help them avoid accidentally discriminating against applicants and employees while simply trying to obtain fully updated, accurate documents.

What federal law established the need to obtain I-9 documents from job applicants?

Congress passed the Immigration Reform and Control Act (IRCA) back in 1986. It requires employers to obtain job applicant documents that validate each person’s right to work in this country. This task is handled by fully completing a Form I-9 document for each job applicant. To help establish their legal status, applicants can produce such items as:  a driver’s license, a Permanent Resident Card, a US passport, a birth certificate and a Social Security card.

Can some I-9 documents be acceptable even when they initially look questionable?

The simple answer to that question is “Yes.” However, you should always keep notes in your file concerning any odd documents that you first believed might be false – and keep a copy of them. As ICE notes on its website, there are times when a worker may show you documents indicating different last names – and that may be acceptable if the job applicant can provide you with a reasonable explanation for the varied listings.

While employers must be respectful and open-minded while handling required I-9 tasks, they should be acting in agreement with previously established, written employee guidelines clearly noting that all new hires and established employees can be fired for providing any false job applicant documents. When you haven’t already created such written guidelines and acceptable standards of employee conduct, you may later find yourself accused of discriminating against an applicant or employee based upon his or her immigrant (or special ethnic) status.

This type of scenario often unfolds when an employee informs you after being hired that one or more documents given to you before being hired was fraudulent or invalid. This tends to occur when the employee is trying to provide you with newly updated, valid documents.

This specific type of issue was presented to the Department of Justice (DOJ) back in 2015. Unfortunately, instead of issuing an advisory opinion, the DOJ simply noted that employers should already be prepared to handle these types of issues — based on established employee conduct guidelines. Otherwise, they risk being sued for one of at least four employment-related forms of discrimination.

Is it true that some employers have been heavily fined for I-9 violations?

Yes. One of the largest fines recently imposed by the Office of the Chief Administrative Hearing Officer (OCAHO) involving I-9 irregularities was against Hartmann Studios. That company was required (in July of 2015) to pay $600,000 in civil penalties. (That amount had been reduced from the original penalty sought of $812,665.) When Hartmann was undergoing a new inspection back in 2011, the company employed over 700 workers.

While that large sum of money is quite high, it’s important to recognize that Hartmann Studios was unable to provide any I-9s for some of its employees who had been terminated and needed an extension of time to produce documents for others.

What steps can our office (or company) take now, to make sure were fully complying with all current I-9 document guidelines?

If you haven’t already done so, give serious thought to signing up for the US government’s
E-Verify program that can help you properly process all your I-9 documents. By visiting this government website, you can learn more about how this program works. Your usage of this service may help establish your good-faith attempt to properly handle all I-9 duties.

You may also want to ask your lawyer if you should require all newly hired (and established) employees to sign a form that clearly indicates their awareness that they may be immediately fired for their dishonesty if you ever learn that they’ve provided you with any fraudulent I-9 documents. If you do this, you’ll need to strictly apply this standard.

Please contact our Murray Lobb law office so we can answer any other questions you may have about properly handling all I-9 documents. We can also provide you with advice on drawing up a general employee handbook — that also fully alerts all employees to the possible consequences of supplying your company with fraudulent I-9 documents.

Should You Work as a Sole Proprietor?

Many professional real estate agents, accountants, landscapers and website designers are among those who regularly handle their business as sole proprietors. It’s often the easiest way to start  working — although you should always check with your city and county to be sure you’re meeting all their requirements.

Before offering your goods and services to others, it’s wise to also speak with your Houston business law attorney to find out if another legal structure like a limited liability company (LLC) or small corporation might better suit your needs.

Chief Advantages of Running a Sole Proprietorship

  • You alone call all the shots. It’s up to you to make every important decision without having to answer to any partners or investors.
  • There is far less paperwork for you to file than if you formed a limited liability company (LLC), a partnership or a corporation. (However, those other legal structures usually provide better protection for your personal wealth and business assets.)
  • Your daily management tasks can remain simpler if you don’t need to hire any independent contractors or employees. Sole proprietors often have very straightforward duties tied to bookkeeping and filing taxes.

Potential Drawbacks of Working as a Sole Proprietor

  • Your business may have to temporarily shut down if you become ill or briefly incapacitated. This can readily happen unless your spouse or another responsible party is able and willing to complete your current assignments, fill all open orders – and handle any urgent business matters.
  • If other people sue you, they can often reach all your personal and business assets to satisfy any judgments entered against you.
  • If you need additional investment money, you have no partners or other immediate parties who can help supply the funds that are required.
  • You’re less likely to have an adequate support network of business mentors and consultants — unless you carefully developed one ahead of time.

To help you answer other initial questions you may have about working as a sole proprietor, additional information is set forth below. There’s also a brief reference to the new Tax Code signed into law in December 2017 that may affect many sole proprietors.

First Steps That Can Help You When Setting Up a Sole Proprietorship

  • Visit business websites popular with entrepreneurs. This may help you answer some key questions and become aware of new issues. Useful sites include the Small Business Development Center Network (NTSBDC) and the Small Business Administration (SBA).
  • Choose the best business name available. Decide whether you want to simply work using your own personal name or a professional business name. You can ask your lawyer to help you find out if specific DBAs (“doing business as”) names are already taken. You can also pay minimal fees to conduct preliminary searches on the Texas Secretary of State’s website.Decide whether you need to obtain a sales tax permit from the Texas State Comptroller’s Office. This depends on the nature of the products you’ll be selling.
  • If you’ll be working in Harris County, you’ll probably need to obtain an EIN (Employer Identification Number) for handling your tax filings. You may also need an EIN when opening a separate bank account for your business.
  • Consider hiring any workers you need as independent contractors. Keep in mind that it’s much safer (for liability purposes) for sole proprietors to only hire independent contractors.  If you still decide to hire actual employees, you must give serious thought to buying a general business liability insurance policy. If you have that when an employee sues you, they usually cannot reach your personal assets. Also, be aware that if you’re working out of your home and one of your employees falls and gets hurt there, your homeowner’s insurance policy will usually not cover that type of injury.
  • Decide whether you want to work out of your home, an office, or while sharing rental space with other entrepreneurs.
  • Be prepared to change your business structure to an LLC or other form when your business needs or liability concerns change.
  • If you decide to stop doing business, make sure you follow any pertinent laws involved with providing notice to all current customers and/or employees.

Changes in the New Tax Code Passed in December 2017 That May Affect You

Be sure to ask your Houston business law attorney how the new tax code changes may affect you as a sole proprietor. This may depend on whether you’re running what is considered to be a “pass-through” business.

Creating a Valid Limited Partnership in Texas

Few activities are as rewarding as setting up a new business when you’re ready to start selling your goods or services to the public. However, it’s important to understand the distinct benefits and drawbacks of the various business structures you can choose from. While some people prefer to run a sole proprietorship, others believe they’ll be better served by either creating a partnership, limited liability company or corporation. If you’re uncertain which structure may work best for you, it’s important to meet with your Houston business law attorney for early guidance and advice.

This article focuses on the formation of a Texas limited partnership (LP) and how its structure and requirements are unique compared to those of a limited liability partnership (LLP).

How Can Specific Business Structures Affect You & Your Company?

The structure you choose directly bears on the taxes your partnership may have to pay, the paperwork that must be filed with the state before you can begin transacting business, how you can raise money to finance your activities, and your own personal liability for debts owed by the partnership.

How Do Texas Limited Partnerships and Limited Liability Partnerships Differ?

One of the main distinctions between an LP and an LLP is that a limited partnership has only one general partner whose liability is unlimited – and all the other partners have limited liability. As might be expected, the partners assigned limited liability only have limited control over how the company or business is run.

A limited partnership is required to operate in keeping with its oral or written partnership agreement. As is true regarding most business matters, it’s always best to capture any agreement this important in written form. Although you do not have to file a copy of the partnership agreement with the state of Texas, you do need to provide a “certificate of formation” to the Texas Secretary of State’s Office.

Some businesses prefer to limit the general partners’ liability by creating a limited liability partnership (LLP). Those forming this type of business structure must provide the Secretary of State’s Office with a properly completed registration form.

Additional Key Facts You Should Know When Forming a Limited Partnership (LP)

  • Each LP is governed by Texas Business Organizations Code (BOC) Title 4, Chapters 151, 153 and 154. Specific details governing the contents of the required certificate of formation are set forth in the BOC Title 1, Chapter 3, Subchapter A;
  • Every LP will have one or more general partners – as well as one or more limited partners. In addition to individual people, partners can also be corporations, partnerships and other types of legal entities;
  • Taxation. Keep in mind that limited partnerships are subject to paying a franchise tax. You can learn more about your partnership’s tax status by contacting the Tax Assistance Section of the Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts. (Be sure to research other possible federal government tax issues by visiting the Internal Revenue Service website at www.irs.gov);
  • In your certificate of formation, your LP must provide the Secretary of State’s Office with a fully unique name for your partnership that’s distinctly different from any other one currently in existence;
  • A registered agent (who has fully consented to serve in this role) and a registered office must be set forth in your certificate;
  • The name (and address) of each general partner must be provided in your certificate. Every general partner must sign the certificate of formation.

While this is not intended to be a comprehensive listing of every requirement for properly filing an LP’s certificate of formation, it should clearly indicate that you must provide highly accurate and detailed information. Once the Texas Secretary of State files your certificate, your LP should become legally recognized. However, since certain questions may be raised about the certificate’s contents, it’s always best to have a lawyer help you fill it out and then review it before it’s filed.

Lawyers in our office are always available to help you determine the best formal structure for your business – and to help you file all required paperwork with the Texas Secretary of State’s Office.

Starting a New Business: Avoid These common Mistakes

Starting a New Business: Avoid These Common Mistakes

Few activities in life are more challenging and exciting than starting a new business. So, if you’re determined to succeed, always accept advice from those who’ve been where you are now and know what often works best. Careful early planning can pay you back many times over later when your properly marketed goods and services motivate satisfied customers to tell others about your unique offerings.

By making the hard choices described below during your start-up phase, you can avoid many errors that often prevent hard-working people with great ideas from carving out a highly profitable niche in today’s marketplace.

The Key Early Decisions New Business Owners Must Make

  • Choose your co-owners wisely. Always look beyond each person’s academic degrees and decide if their experience is strong enough to withstand the challenges of running a business. Clearly define each owner’s responsibilities and how you’ll regularly monitor each other’s performance. Consider requiring every major stakeholder to undergo professional personality testing so you’ll know if you can each offset the specific strengths and weaknesses of one another that high-stress situations often reveal.
  • Fully track all money being spent and coming in. Be sure to hire a competent, in-house accountant. Agree in writing how all funding will be spent.
  • Have your lawyers draft one or more standard form contracts that fully protect your company’s rights. They should be thorough, but not so burdensome or one-sided that customers will refuse to sign them.
  • Meet early on with your trustworthy Houston business law attorneys. Carefully listen as they describe the various business structures that might best suit your company and the different tax consequences that accompany each one. Learn all you can about the state and federal employment laws and regulations you must follow. Ask for help drawing up your first employee handbook (spelling out all employee benefits) and decide if your employees should all sign “at-will” employment offer letters. Obtain advice on choosing the best available name for your company. Inquire about having everyone sign NDAs (non-disclosure agreements) protecting company secrets. And learn all you can about properly handling sexual harassment issues and claims of discrimination;
  • Create a flexible business plan with reasonable goals. This should normally be drawn up after you’ve decided on your business structure (such as a “C” corporation or “LLC”) and created a written operating agreement that clearly defines all key partners’ general duties and responsibilities, financial contributions, and liabilities. Be sure everyone knows that added responsibilities may be added to each person’s assigned tasks as unexpected needs arise. You should also agree in writing whether you must obtain help through arbitration or mediation services when internal problems cannot be readily resolved;
  • Hire the best employees you can afford. Just as you need to choose co-founders with proven records of making ethical business decisions, you also need highly flexible employees who are told up front that they may need to “wear many hats” as new duties must be assigned.
  • Check out your competition ahead of time and properly fund adequate marketing of your goods and services. Never assume all your company’s offerings are completely unique. Fully handle all due diligence tasks in a timely manner so you can hopefully determine how your competitors have been successfully reaching the very customers you hope to win over. Be sure the market (or location) you’re targeting can handle all the current competition – and make adequate plans to distinguish your brand from all the others.

While the suggestions shared above should help you, always be ready to consult with others as you broaden your web of industry experts and colleagues. If you need to raise more capital for your business, keep in mind that it’s often wise to befriend employees at companies currently funded by the specific venture capitalists you hope to meet with in the future.

Always Place a High Value on Customer Feedback – Readily Making Changes as Needed

No matter how good your in-house experts may be, your customers can often offer you invaluable information about how you may need to periodically change specific products or services. You should also ask them for their ideas on how you might improve your marketing efforts. Consider offering fee discounts to current customers if they’ll undergo brief interviews about your company. You might also simply ask customers to complete brief online surveys about your products and services.

If you’ll meet regularly with your co-founders and openly discuss problems as soon as they arise, chances are your new business will succeed.

Steps Required to Dissolve a General Partnership in Texas

Steps Required to Dissolve a General Partnership in Texas

Even when business partners get along well with each other and succeed, a time may come when they may develop new interests, decide to retire or move elsewhere for business or pleasure reasons. While the Internet and modern communications make it possible to still run businesses with partners scattered around the globe, it’s still quite common for partnerships to break apart or take on new members when others leave.

Do You Need a Written Partnership Agreement in Texas?

Normally, Texas law doesn’t require general (or “at-will”) partnerships to create a written partnership agreement. However, it’s always best to draft one so that when the entity breaks apart (or any partner leaves), you’ll know exactly how to pay off all partnership debts and distribute the remaining assets among everyone.

When general partnerships don’t have an agreement, then Texas law expects the partners to govern their “wind-up” activities in keeping with our state’s default partnership laws.

Here’s a broad overview of the tasks that you and your partners must handle as you dissolve your partnership. Should you have any questions at this early stage, it’s always wise to schedule an appointment with your Houston business law attorney.

First Steps to Take When Preparing to Dissolve Your Partnership

Schedule a meeting so everyone can discuss how your written partnership agreement requires you to dissolve the partnership. During this meeting, you must take a vote to determine if all parties still holding majority rights (or financial interests equal to or greater than 50% of the partnership assets) favor dissolving it. Next, ask this same majority to vote whether they’re ready to draft and sign a written resolution stating that the partnership will now wind up all its affairs and be dissolved.

At this point, all partners who want to keep working together under a new partnership agreement can indicate this desire to everyone else – and offer to buy-out the partnership shares of those who are leaving.

Handling Debt Payments and Winding Up All Remaining Matters

Every current partner should expressly agree to complete certain tasks approved by all those winding down the partnership’s affairs – and to refrain from negotiating any new business that could potentially obligate all partners after the dissolution.

As referenced above, those leaving the partnership are free to sell their shares in it to others, in keeping with their original partnership agreement (or the state’s laws governing such transactions when there is no written agreement). To help the partnership pay off existing debts, all partners can vote on which current partnership assets (if any) may be sold for cash.

The laws governing the pay-off of all partnership debts are set forth in our state’s Uniform Partnership Act. It basically states that you must pay off all your creditors first – before paying back each partner for all past capital contributions to the partnership.

Are There Any Remaining Wind-Up Steps You Must Address?

  • Paperwork filing with the state. In Texas, there’s no need to file anything when dissolving an at-will (general) partnership;
  • Providing notice to all creditors, customers and other parties. It’s customary to send out notices through the mail to all your business contacts so they’ll know that your partnership is being dissolved as of a certain date. However, there’s no law which requires this to be done. You can also just simply publish a notice about the dissolution in your local newspaper;
  • Updating all out-of-state registrations. To prevent your partnership from owing any more fees to other states where you’ve registered for the right to do business, you need to formally notify the correct offices via certified mail that you’re dissolving your partnership;
  • Paying all taxes that are owed. Although Texas doesn’t require you to obtain a tax clearance before winding-up your partnership, you must make sure all taxes owed have been paid before dissolving it. This step includes filing a final federal tax return for your partnership in keeping with Texas law.

Should you have any specific questions about dissolving your partnership – or making sure that you’re handling all tax matters properly – please contact our law firm so we can provide you with all pertinent legal advice.

An Overview:  Winding Up Texas Corporate Activities

An Overview:  Winding Up Texas Corporate Activities

Corporate officers can choose to formally “wind-up” all business activities when many different factors change. For example, when smaller corporations are involved, key parties may simply want to retire or pursue new goals. In other situations, market trends may change so significantly that corporate officers may want to choose more advantageous business structures. Regardless of why any specific Texas corporation decides to go through the termination process, basic legal steps must be followed carefully.

Since this process can involve different statutes, including detailed sections of the state’s Business Organizations Code, it’s always best to confer with your Houston corporate law attorneys. They’ll readily understand the termination process that the Texas Secretary of State’s Office expects each corporation to complete. (Of course, in some instances, a corporation may be involuntarily terminated for various reasons – including the failure to file annual reports).

Here’s a look at some of the steps you must be ready to take based on our state’s governing laws and the specific realities involved with your business. Although other states may speak of “dissolving” corporations, Texas usually refers to “winding up” corporate matters.

The Texas Business Organization Code’s Two Main Ways to “Wind Up” Activities

  1. The board of directors adopts a resolution. It should state that they are recommending that the corporation “wind up” its activities — after submitting this proposal to all the shareholders. At a properly convened meeting, the shareholders must then vote on this proposal. In general, a two-thirds majority of the shareholders must approve this decision before the winding-up process can begin;
  2. All shareholders must sign a “consent” document. Once this has been done, the “consent” document must be entered into the corporate records. This approach is most common when smaller corporations are involved. Great care must be taken to cover all key termination matters within this consent agreement.

Once this early internal activity has been concluded, numerous other steps must be taken to properly conclude all corporate business matters.

Common Additional Steps Required to “Wind Up” Your Corporation

  • All known parties with claims against the corporation must be served with notice of the current intent to terminate the corporation’s existence;
  • Every necessary corporate lawsuit must be properly initiated and concluded;
  • All corporate property must be properly collected and sold – depending on whether its value is owed in some manner to the shareholders;
  • All corporate liabilities must be properly discharged – including the payment of any taxes owed to the IRS or the state of Texas.

General Tax Issues and Obtaining Required Certificates

While your Texas corporate attorney may be prepared to handle all your corporation’s tax payment issues involved with the “winding up” process, you may also want to confer with a tax attorney.

Keep in mind that your corporation must obtain a “certificate of account status” from the Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts — and a final federal tax return must be properly filed once all corporate finances have been finalized.

Filing a Certificate of Termination

After you’ve obtained a certificate of account status from the Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts, you’ll need to file Form 651 (a certificate of termination) with the Secretary of State’s Office. Once this step has been taken and approved, your corporation’s existence has legally ended.

Added Issues That May Need to Be Addressed

Keep in mind that the information provided above was simply intended as an overview of the Texas corporate “winding up” process. Your attorney will be able to provide you further advice about whether additional paperwork is required. Fox example, certain Texas laws governing corporate mergers may or may not apply to your situation.

Please feel free to contact our law office with any questions you may have about possibly terminating your Texas corporation – or any other business entity. We can provide you with the advice you’ll need to properly handle all required stages of this process.